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Saint Andrews Golf Course

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SPORTS
July 18, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: Why are there always 18 holes on a golf course? Answer: Because in 1764, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews needed some room and cut up what had been 22 holes to leave 18. Eighteen has been the standard ever since. Q: Why do golf courses have an "out" nine and an "in" nine? A: Because in 1552, when Scotsmen started playing the game in the Kingdome of Fife, along the bluffs above St.
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SPORTS
July 12, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
The road back to our sporting soul begins on, well, a road. A regular road, one lane, paved, black and straight, filled with footsteps and tire squeals and life. The road was once used to haul boats between the North Sea and this tiny medieval town. It is used by families walking to the beach, children kicking soccer balls to school, motorists taking the scenic route. It's called Granny Clark's Wynd, and there's nothing too special about it, with one exception.
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SPORTS
July 17, 1990 | Jim Murray
I like the British Open for the same reasons I like real diamonds, original paintings, solid gold, 100% wool, white bread, grand opera and sterling silver. This is not your Fiduciary and Indemnity Greater Greensboro Open or your Perpetual Payments Insurance Open. This is not some rubber mat tee track in East Texas or a condominium-lined housing project in Tempe. This is golf the way they used to play it with gutta-percha balls and clubs that were known as mashie niblicks and cleeks.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a new twist to the Old Course for the British Open that begins today on the most famous layout in golf. It's longer, in fact some 182 yards longer than the 1995 Open played here. It's an interesting matchup, all right, sort of like a heavyweight prize fight. In this corner, at 7,115 yards, the Old Course. And, in this corner, No. 1 in the world, Tiger Woods. Oh, and there are 155 other guys here too.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a new twist to the Old Course for the British Open that begins today on the most famous layout in golf. It's longer, in fact some 182 yards longer than the 1995 Open played here. It's an interesting matchup, all right, sort of like a heavyweight prize fight. In this corner, at 7,115 yards, the Old Course. And, in this corner, No. 1 in the world, Tiger Woods. Oh, and there are 155 other guys here too.
SPORTS
July 26, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Scotland was, as they say, a trip. It was like stepping back a century. If you loved 1890, you'd love Scotland. Oh, they have telephones and electricity and traffic jams and VCRs and high-rises and the ships in the Tay are landing oil and, I suppose, imported cars. But the fields are full of sheep and thistle grows in the meadows and you can step five miles out of Dundee and see the same Scotland Robbie Burns wrote about. St.
SPORTS
July 19, 1995 | JIM MURRAY
This is where it all began. This course saw Sarazen, Vardon, Bobby Jones, Hagen. Nicklaus won here. Twice. This is golf's shrine. Its fountainhead. Its Garden of Eden. This is where a guy first yelled "Fore!" at a slow-playing group ahead. This is where the first guy said, "That's good, take it away!" This is where they first pressed the bet, where a guy three down first said, "You're pressed--four ways!" This is where a guy first clapped his hand to his head after a tee shot and groaned, "No!
SPORTS
July 12, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
The road back to our sporting soul begins on, well, a road. A regular road, one lane, paved, black and straight, filled with footsteps and tire squeals and life. The road was once used to haul boats between the North Sea and this tiny medieval town. It is used by families walking to the beach, children kicking soccer balls to school, motorists taking the scenic route. It's called Granny Clark's Wynd, and there's nothing too special about it, with one exception.
SPORTS
July 16, 1995 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind may be blowing off the North Sea this week for the British Open at the Old Course, the most famous 18 golf holes in the world. Or it may be still. Chances are, it's going to be as hot as shortbread and as dry as the sand in Hell Bunker. Or it's going to be as wet as a bottle of Scotch whiskey.
SPORTS
July 19, 1995 | JIM MURRAY
This is where it all began. This course saw Sarazen, Vardon, Bobby Jones, Hagen. Nicklaus won here. Twice. This is golf's shrine. Its fountainhead. Its Garden of Eden. This is where a guy first yelled "Fore!" at a slow-playing group ahead. This is where the first guy said, "That's good, take it away!" This is where they first pressed the bet, where a guy three down first said, "You're pressed--four ways!" This is where a guy first clapped his hand to his head after a tee shot and groaned, "No!
SPORTS
July 16, 1995 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind may be blowing off the North Sea this week for the British Open at the Old Course, the most famous 18 golf holes in the world. Or it may be still. Chances are, it's going to be as hot as shortbread and as dry as the sand in Hell Bunker. Or it's going to be as wet as a bottle of Scotch whiskey.
SPORTS
July 26, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Scotland was, as they say, a trip. It was like stepping back a century. If you loved 1890, you'd love Scotland. Oh, they have telephones and electricity and traffic jams and VCRs and high-rises and the ships in the Tay are landing oil and, I suppose, imported cars. But the fields are full of sheep and thistle grows in the meadows and you can step five miles out of Dundee and see the same Scotland Robbie Burns wrote about. St.
SPORTS
July 18, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: Why are there always 18 holes on a golf course? Answer: Because in 1764, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews needed some room and cut up what had been 22 holes to leave 18. Eighteen has been the standard ever since. Q: Why do golf courses have an "out" nine and an "in" nine? A: Because in 1552, when Scotsmen started playing the game in the Kingdome of Fife, along the bluffs above St.
SPORTS
July 17, 1990 | Jim Murray
I like the British Open for the same reasons I like real diamonds, original paintings, solid gold, 100% wool, white bread, grand opera and sterling silver. This is not your Fiduciary and Indemnity Greater Greensboro Open or your Perpetual Payments Insurance Open. This is not some rubber mat tee track in East Texas or a condominium-lined housing project in Tempe. This is golf the way they used to play it with gutta-percha balls and clubs that were known as mashie niblicks and cleeks.
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