Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSaint Francis Dam
IN THE NEWS

Saint Francis Dam

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989
Times writer Frank Clifford has made a good point about the absence of any reference to the Saint Francis Dam disaster in the Department of Water and Power's exhibits at our museum ("L.A. History: The Future Looks Good," Part I, April 19). The Castaic Reservoir Visitors' Center also shows nothing. While this disaster is certainly an embarrassment, disasters like that will continue to occur if we continue to pretend that they can't happen and have never happened. The one thing that success breeds is complacency.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are raw snapshots, some fuzzy and out of focus, all of them amateurish and rough. Even so, the images are arresting--a house shoved into the middle of the street, flattened orchards, a row of cars that belonged to Edison camp workers who lay dead in the rubble. The collection of more than 100 snapshots depict the aftermath of the 1928 St. Francis Dam collapse, one of California's worst disasters.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are raw snapshots, some fuzzy and out of focus, all of them amateurish and rough. Even so, the images are arresting--a house shoved into the middle of the street, flattened orchards, a row of cars that belonged to Edison camp workers who lay dead in the rubble. The collection of more than 100 snapshots depicts the aftermath of the 1928 St. Francis Dam collapse, one of California's worst disasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are raw snapshots, some fuzzy and out of focus, all of them amateurish and rough. Even so, the images are arresting--a house shoved into the middle of the street, flattened orchards, a row of cars that belonged to Edison camp workers who lay dead in the rubble. The collection of more than 100 snapshots depicts the aftermath of the 1928 St. Francis Dam collapse, one of California's worst disasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The poor folks never had a beggar's chance." --A rescue worker who recovered bodies of victims. In the chill, dead quiet of night on March 12, 1928, the 2-year-old St. Francis Dam stood in lonely grandeur--deep in a hardscrabble canyon 50 miles north of Los Angeles. It had been hailed as William Mulholland's "impregnable" engineering masterpiece, a solitary keeper of 12 billion gallons of water. But suddenly, at 11:57 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are raw snapshots, some fuzzy and out of focus, all of them amateurish and rough. Even so, the images are arresting--a house shoved into the middle of the street, flattened orchards, a row of cars that belonged to Edison camp workers who lay dead in the rubble. The collection of more than 100 snapshots depict the aftermath of the 1928 St. Francis Dam collapse, one of California's worst disasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no malls, movie theaters or cafes at the mouth of San Francisquito Canyon. It's scrubland--dried grasses and cactus. Drive into the canyon, past where the Butterfield stagecoach once ran, and you'll probably see horses grazing behind wooden corrals. This canyon has a markedly Western feel. And the people here want to keep it that way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no malls, movie theaters or cafes at the mouth of San Francisquito Canyon. It's scrubland--dried grasses and cactus. Drive into the canyon, past where the Butterfield stagecoach once ran, and you'll probably see horses grazing behind wooden corrals. This canyon has a markedly Western feel. And the people here want to keep it that way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The poor folks never had a beggar's chance." --A rescue worker who recovered bodies of victims. In the chill, dead quiet of night on March 12, 1928, the 2-year-old St. Francis Dam stood in lonely grandeur--deep in a hardscrabble canyon 50 miles north of Los Angeles. It had been hailed as William Mulholland's "impregnable" engineering masterpiece, a solitary keeper of 12 billion gallons of water. But suddenly, at 11:57 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989
Times writer Frank Clifford has made a good point about the absence of any reference to the Saint Francis Dam disaster in the Department of Water and Power's exhibits at our museum ("L.A. History: The Future Looks Good," Part I, April 19). The Castaic Reservoir Visitors' Center also shows nothing. While this disaster is certainly an embarrassment, disasters like that will continue to occur if we continue to pretend that they can't happen and have never happened. The one thing that success breeds is complacency.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|