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Saint Jude Medical Inc

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BUSINESS
June 29, 1994 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siemens Pacesetter Inc., the Sylmar-based producer of cardiac pacemakers and other medical equipment, will be purchased for about $500 million by St. Jude Medical Inc., the world's leading maker of heart valves, the companies announced Tuesday. The deal will place St. Jude, based in St. Paul, Minn., in the top tier of pacing-device makers and will put both companies in a better position to compete in the rapidly changing health care industry, St. Jude Chief Executive Ronald A. Matricaria said.
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NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
St. Paul, Minn.-based St. Jude Medical Inc., the nation's second-largest manufacturer of pacemakers, said that some of its pacemakers could malfunction because of an electrical connection problem. It was the second time in the last month that the medical device maker warned of possible defects in its products. The company said a defective batch of epoxy could cause a malfunction in about 10% of the 891 Affinity pacemakers manufactured last summer.
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BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
St. Jude Medical Inc. will pay about $660 million in stock and cash for Ventritex Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif., and other acquisitions, expanding its share of the market for devices that treat irregular heartbeats. St. Jude, the No. 1 maker of mechanical heart valves, will pay about $505 million in stock for Ventritex, a maker of defibrillators, which slow a patient's heartbeat. The St. Paul, Minn.-based company will also acquire Pacific Dunlop Ltd.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998
An anonymous donor's gift of almost $900,000 will allow the St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton to complete its gastrointestinal lab expansion. The money, donated by a La Habra Heights resident in July, will go toward improving the lab's technological capabilities and building an additional lab procedure room. It is scheduled to open in 2000. The lab expansion project is part of the Campaign for Life, a fund-raising effort that the St. Jude Memorial Foundation began in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998
An anonymous donor's gift of almost $900,000 will allow the St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton to complete its gastrointestinal lab expansion. The money, donated by a La Habra Heights resident in July, will go toward improving the lab's technological capabilities and building an additional lab procedure room. It is scheduled to open in 2000. The lab expansion project is part of the Campaign for Life, a fund-raising effort that the St. Jude Memorial Foundation began in September.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1992
Hancock-Jaffe Laboratories, a developer of biological implants for the cardiovascular, orthopedic and plastic surgery markets, has entered into a joint-venture agreement with a Minnesota company. St. Jude Medical Inc. of St. Paul made the announcement Monday, saying the deal will allow the companies to combine their research in developing a heart valve made from tissue rather than a non-biological material. St.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She never had children of her own, but Agnes Plumb still liked to help kids out. Even though she didn't have a job, she would still sit down at the kitchen table of her modest ranch-style home in Studio City and write a $250 check here or a $500 check there for local children's charities. So administrators at the Crippled Children's Society and Orthopaedic Hospital in Los Angeles weren't surprised to learn that the 88-year-old woman, who died a year ago, had remembered them in her will.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
St. Paul, Minn.-based St. Jude Medical Inc., the nation's second-largest manufacturer of pacemakers, said that some of its pacemakers could malfunction because of an electrical connection problem. It was the second time in the last month that the medical device maker warned of possible defects in its products. The company said a defective batch of epoxy could cause a malfunction in about 10% of the 891 Affinity pacemakers manufactured last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1994 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
In its first such action, St. Jude Medical Center is offering severance packages to dozens of nurses in its medical surgical units, the hospital confirmed Friday. Employees said the announcement came abruptly at a 7 a.m. staff meeting Thursday. The hospital's 52 licensed vocational nurses said they were told that they could either stay on as patient care technicians--a lower job classification that pays less--or accept the severance package and seek work elsewhere.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She never had children of her own, but Agnes Plumb still liked to help kids out. Even though she didn't have a job, she would still sit down at the kitchen table of her modest ranch-style home in Studio City and write a $250 check here or a $500 check there for local children's charities. So administrators at the Crippled Children's Society and Orthopaedic Hospital in Los Angeles weren't surprised to learn that the 88-year-old woman, who died a year ago, had remembered them in her will.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
St. Jude Medical Inc. will pay about $660 million in stock and cash for Ventritex Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif., and other acquisitions, expanding its share of the market for devices that treat irregular heartbeats. St. Jude, the No. 1 maker of mechanical heart valves, will pay about $505 million in stock for Ventritex, a maker of defibrillators, which slow a patient's heartbeat. The St. Paul, Minn.-based company will also acquire Pacific Dunlop Ltd.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1994 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
In its first such action, St. Jude Medical Center is offering severance packages to dozens of nurses in its medical surgical units, the hospital confirmed Friday. Employees said the announcement came abruptly at a 7 a.m. staff meeting Thursday. The hospital's 52 licensed vocational nurses said they were told that they could either stay on as patient care technicians--a lower job classification that pays less--or accept the severance package and seek work elsewhere.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1994 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siemens Pacesetter Inc., the Sylmar-based producer of cardiac pacemakers and other medical equipment, will be purchased for about $500 million by St. Jude Medical Inc., the world's leading maker of heart valves, the companies announced Tuesday. The deal will place St. Jude, based in St. Paul, Minn., in the top tier of pacing-device makers and will put both companies in a better position to compete in the rapidly changing health care industry, St. Jude Chief Executive Ronald A. Matricaria said.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1992
Hancock-Jaffe Laboratories, a developer of biological implants for the cardiovascular, orthopedic and plastic surgery markets, has entered into a joint-venture agreement with a Minnesota company. St. Jude Medical Inc. of St. Paul made the announcement Monday, saying the deal will allow the companies to combine their research in developing a heart valve made from tissue rather than a non-biological material. St.
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