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SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We settled into our seats for a doubleheader between the Detroit Tigers and the St. Louis Browns on a hot August Sunday at Sportsman's Park in 1951. I started looking at the Browns' roster in the 10-cent scorecard. Any day you went to a Brown game, scanning the roster was imperative; Bill Veeck, who owned the ragamuffin team, was constantly shuffling players in and out of the minor leagues, making trades with other teams. The number that started the roster jumped out at you: 1/8--Gaedel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the age of multimillion-dollar salaries and lucrative athletic endorsements, the players on the St. Louis Browns struggled for just a little bit of respect. They got it, of all places, in Burbank, where the feckless baseball team conducted spring training from 1949 to 1952 at Olive Memorial Stadium.
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SPORTS
October 11, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Going My Way," the movie that won the Academy Award in 1944, Bing Crosby played a New York priest but appeared in some scenes wearing a St. Louis Browns' T-shirt. Although Crosby was a minor stockholder in the Pittsburgh Pirates, the shirt with the Browns' name on it was more timely. For in 1944, 45 years ago, the Browns not only won their only pennant, but St.
SPORTS
July 31, 1993 | ALAN DROOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was never Public Enemy No. 1, and if this Dillinger was wanted in his day, it was for his ability to hit a baseball. Meet Bob (Duke) Dillinger, one of the best players most fans probably never heard of. Duke could hit .300 in his sleep. While teams tried to find sluggers in the mold of Ted Williams and Hank Greenberg after World War II, the slap-hitting Dillinger could run like few others in the American League. He played in the 1949 All-Star game at Ebbets Field.
SPORTS
July 31, 1993 | ALAN DROOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was never Public Enemy No. 1, and if this Dillinger was wanted in his day, it was for his ability to hit a baseball. Meet Bob (Duke) Dillinger, one of the best players most fans probably never heard of. Duke could hit .300 in his sleep. While teams tried to find sluggers in the mold of Ted Williams and Hank Greenberg after World War II, the slap-hitting Dillinger could run like few others in the American League. He played in the 1949 All-Star game at Ebbets Field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the age of multimillion-dollar salaries and lucrative athletic endorsements, the players on the St. Louis Browns struggled for just a little bit of respect. They got it, of all places, in Burbank, where the feckless baseball team conducted spring training from 1949 to 1952 at Olive Memorial Stadium.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago today, Eddie Gaedel broke into the big leagues. And if he were alive, a boisterous, fun-loving man named Bill Veeck would still be laughing today at the sight--a 3-foot-7 midget, in a trim-fitting St. Louis Browns uniform with " 1/8" on the back, striding resolutely, 17-inch bat in hand, to home plate. It remains baseball's Hall of Fame practical joke, and just may be the sport's single funniest moment. And it had to be Veeck who pulled it off.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We settled into our seats for a doubleheader between the Detroit Tigers and the St. Louis Browns on a hot August Sunday at Sportsman's Park in 1951. I started looking at the Browns' roster in the 10-cent scorecard. Any day you went to a Brown game, scanning the roster was imperative; Bill Veeck, who owned the ragamuffin team, was constantly shuffling players in and out of the minor leagues, making trades with other teams. The number that started the roster jumped out at you: 1/8--Gaedel.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago today, Eddie Gaedel broke into the big leagues. And if he were alive, a boisterous, fun-loving man named Bill Veeck would still be laughing today at the sight--a 3-foot-7 midget, in a trim-fitting St. Louis Browns uniform with " 1/8" on the back, striding resolutely, 17-inch bat in hand, to home plate. It remains baseball's Hall of Fame practical joke, and just may be the sport's single funniest moment. And it had to be Veeck who pulled it off.
SPORTS
October 11, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Going My Way," the movie that won the Academy Award in 1944, Bing Crosby played a New York priest but appeared in some scenes wearing a St. Louis Browns' T-shirt. Although Crosby was a minor stockholder in the Pittsburgh Pirates, the shirt with the Browns' name on it was more timely. For in 1944, 45 years ago, the Browns not only won their only pennant, but St.
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