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SPORTS
July 1, 1994 | ARA NAJARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the heat, it's the humility. St. Louis has endured some sports scars in recent years. It's a city where the football team left, basketball teams won't come, hockey's ice has melted and the baseball team is so-so. And it didn't get the World Cup. But this is a resilient city that dried itself from last year's floods. So, against the backdrop of an arch that is less familiar to some of today's youth than the Golden Arches, the 1994 U.S.
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SPORTS
January 25, 2000 | T.J. SIMERS
She walked this very street, leaving her apartment in the 5600 block of Waterman Avenue, crossing DeBaliviere and skipping over to Hamilton Elementary School. Tracing the footsteps of one of this country's sporting giants, this is where the magic all began. Today the library in Hamilton is named after St. Louis' beloved Georgia Frontiere, the Super Bowl-bound owner of the Rams, the little girl who grew up to be a stirring role model for a whole new generation of kids.
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NEWS
December 27, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
December was the month when this city, home of Disneyland and three professional sports teams, expected to add the final details to its blueprint for the next century. City officials hoped to reach an agreement by year's end to build a new baseball stadium for the California Angels and to choose the designer for a dazzling entertainment complex that would surround it.
SPORTS
July 30, 1995 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His downtown office on the 31st floor of One Mercantile Center overlooks the continuing construction of the domed football stadium that lured the Rams from Los Angeles. "There it is," said Thomas Eagleton, former senator and vice-presidential candidate and now a practicing lawyer. "If Orange County and the greater Los Angeles area want football again--build a stadium that is deemed irresistible."
NEWS
January 16, 1995
Here is a selection of comments on Rams owner Georgia Frontiere's plan to move the team to St. Louis. "The partnership between the Rams and the city got off on the wrong foot 15 years ago. . . . We tried over the years to encourage the Rams to embrace Orange County in a sincere way. But they have other priorities." Tom Daly, Anaheim mayor * "I don't want a stigma attached to the area where I live.
SPORTS
April 13, 1995 | LON EUBANKS and CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They won't be calling themselves "Save the Rams" anymore, because that no longer can be done. But the group that has battled for 10 months to prevent the NFL team from leaving Anaheim will have a new mission: to help bring a new or existing NFL franchise to Orange County. Leigh Steinberg and Jack Lindquist, co-chairmen of the organization, were optimistic in the wake of news Wednesday that league owners voted to approve the Rams' move to St. Louis.
SPORTS
January 18, 1995 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Rosenbloom, the 50-year-old son of the Rams' late owner, Carroll Rosenbloom, said Tuesday his father would never have moved the team. "I saw where Georgia (Frontiere) said if Carroll were alive he wouldn't have waited so long (to move the team)," he said. "That's not true. My father made a commitment when we agreed to move the team to Anaheim. And he would have done something with that commitment. He would have made the grass greener there, not looked for greener grass elsewhere.
SPORTS
January 18, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday's announcement that the Rams intend to move to St. Louis has done little to slow the Orange County group working to prevent the team's departure. "The fight is just beginning," said Leigh Steinberg, co-chairman of the Save the Rams task force. "I don't care how bad this looks. We're not done until the first game is played in St. Louis next August. While everyone thinks this is a definitive event in this saga, in reality things will continue to be muddled."
SPORTS
February 4, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Early returns from St. Louis' personal-seat licensing (PSL) campaign, a key component of the city's deal to bring the Rams to Missouri, indicate that it will be a smashing success. As of Wednesday, applications covering 21,000 PSLs had been received and processed, and 10,000 more envelopes had been received but not opened, according to FANS, Inc., the St. Louis group that negotiated the Ram deal.
SPORTS
February 9, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Any doubts about St. Louis' passion for football were put to rest with Wednesday's news that the city has received 72,000 orders for personal seat licenses, far surpassing the sales goal of 50,000 by the start of the 1995 season. There were more PSL requests in three weeks than seats (65,300) available in the new domed stadium the Rams plan to call home next fall. Even the highest-priced PSLs ($4,500) were sold out. "I was personally very much surprised," said former U.S. Sen.
SPORTS
June 24, 1995 | Associated Press
It wasn't as dramatic as Baltimore, public-relations director Rick Smith said of the Rams' move to St. Louis. He was right. Nobody left in the middle of the night for Missouri as the Colts did when they sneaked out of Baltimore and moved to Indianapolis 11 years ago. Friday was moving day for the Rams, who had 18 vehicles scheduled to leave Anaheim for St. Louis, where the team will play for the first time in 1995.
SPORTS
June 21, 1995 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Fry, the lone Ram fan, sat faithful to the end, while beyond the fences movers made preparations to ship his team to St. Louis. All day Tuesday the trucks came and went, and despite the team's concern about being interrupted by sentimental goodbys or a disenchanted mob, there was only the lone Ram fan. Blocked from entering Rams Park by team edict, the lone Ram fan was left to regale George Campbell, the gatekeeper, with fond memories of Eric Dickerson, Jim Everett and Mike Lansford.
SPORTS
June 21, 1995 | Mike Penner
It is always important to make a good last impression, so the Rams are spending their final week in Orange County attempting to rip the locker stalls out of Anaheim Stadium and handing out termination notices, instead of the customary gold watches (how mundane), to employees with 20, 30 and 40 years' service in the organization. If nothing else, the Rams of Georgia Frontiere and John Shaw are obsessively consistent.
SPORTS
June 20, 1995 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anaheim Stadium officials, with little left to lose where the Rams are concerned, are fighting to keep what remains. Officials turned away movers Monday after they attempted to remove 63 locker room cubicles from the stadium. The movers were stopped twice before stadium officials changed the locks. "Basically the truck showed up this morning and the Rams figured they could rip out the lockers," Greg Smith, the stadium's general manager, said. "We had no idea they would be doing this."
SPORTS
June 20, 1995 | CHRIS FOSTER and T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anaheim Stadium officials are fighting to keep what remains of the Rams. Officials turned away movers Monday when they tried to remove 63 locker-room cubicles from the stadium. "Basically the truck showed up this morning and the Rams figured they could rip out the lockers," said Greg Smith, the stadium's general manager. "We had no idea they would be doing this." Ram officials said the team paid for the lockers when the stadium was expanded before the 1980 season.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first of 16 trucks will be loaded Monday, the last expected to depart 2327 W. Lincoln Ave. on Friday, and the Rams will be gone. In addition to the lockers from Rams Park, their longtime practice facility, and from Anaheim Stadium, 100 weight machines, 100,000 pounds in weights, 2,500 pairs of shoes, 300 cases of footballs, two blue-and-gold helmet cars, two video towers, 700 feet in covered fencing, 500 jerseys and assorted desks, chairs and computers will be freighted to St.
SPORTS
April 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
From the Statehouse to corner taverns, football fans in Missouri were ready to embrace the Rams after learning Wednesday the NFL had approved the team's move to St. Louis. Gov. Mel Carnahan grinned broadly when handed an Associated Press bulletin about the vote during a speech to the Missouri Press Assn. The newspaper publishers applauded when Carnahan announced the news. Carnahan called the vote a "tremendous victory for St. Louis, the entire state of Missouri and the football fans in St.
SPORTS
April 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
From the statehouse to corner taverns, Missouri football fans were ready to embrace the Rams after learning Wednesday the NFL had approved the team's move to St. Louis. Gov. Mel Carnahan grinned broadly when handed an Associated Press bulletin about the Rams' vote during a speech to the Missouri Press Assn. The newspaper publishers applauded when the governor announced the news. Carnahan called the vote a "tremendous victory for St.
SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down at Sportsman's Park, the restaurant recently sold by Jackie Smith, Pro Football Hall of Famer and former Cardinal, they are preparing to add $6.95 Ramchops with Georgia peach sauce to the menu. Not everyone will be buying. "I don't think the Rams are worth it," said waitress Maureen Toberman. "They're losers. And we put up that much money? We got people starving in the city." But what about that screaming headline across the top of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Thursday morning?
SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down at Sportsman's Park, the restaurant recently sold by Jackie Smith, Hall of Fame member and former Cardinal tight end, they are preparing to add $6.95 Ram chops with Georgia peach sauce to the menu. Not everyone will be buying. "I don't think the Rams are worth it," Maureen Toberman said. "They're losers. And we put up that much money? We got people starving in the city." But what about that screaming headline across the top of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Thursday morning?
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