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SPORTS
August 20, 1992 | DAVE KINDRED, THE SPORTING NEWS
It's all but impossible for an outsider to get emotional about a baseball team leaving one town to play in another. The good baseball fans of San Francisco may weep about their Giants. We can understand their sadness. But baseball has taught us one lesson well: It's a business first, a game last. And when business is bad, businesses go out of business. That, or they move to a new corner with a sign announcing new management. The new corner in the Giants' case is 3,000 miles away.
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NEWS
March 8, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Outside ballpark gates, schools of fans wait patiently for autographs. Inside, millionaire outfielders and rookie shortstops stretch languidly on the grass. Once again major league baseball has come to Central Florida for the rites of spring training. And under the cobalt-blue skies of the Sunshine State, it's easy to believe that all's right with the world. On this morning, Jerry A.
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SPORTS
January 22, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
President Carl Barger of the Florida Marlins reportedly is angry about reports that owner Jeff Smulyan of the Seattle Mariners has been secretly laying the groundwork for a move to St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1993. According to the Miami Herald, Smulyan has had at least one secret meeting with St. Petersburg officials during the last two weeks. A Mariner spokesman denied the report.
SPORTS
September 30, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN
Angel owner Jackie Autry and other representatives of baseball's executive council will be in San Francisco today to hear the group attempting to keep the Giants in the Bay Area. "We need to get the process moving," Autry said Tuesday night. "We need to find out if San Francisco is serious. The people in Tampa need an answer." Bill White, National League president; Fred Kuhlmann of the St.
SPORTS
September 30, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN
Angel owner Jackie Autry and other representatives of baseball's executive council will be in San Francisco today to hear the group attempting to keep the Giants in the Bay Area. "We need to get the process moving," Autry said Tuesday night. "We need to find out if San Francisco is serious. The people in Tampa need an answer." Bill White, National League president; Fred Kuhlmann of the St.
SPORTS
September 15, 1989 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Noting the benches that used to line its downtown streets, critics once dismissed this sleepy retirement community as "Heaven's waiting room." According to the local joke, people "had one foot in the grave and the other in St. Petersburg." Those sitting on the benches, reported a travel magazine in the 1950s, rode a "streetcar going nowhere." The city's image has changed somewhat since then, and is probably going to change more.
SPORTS
August 14, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
Florida and Georgia are fine states. They give us beaches and peaches. They give us greyhound racing--the dog, not the bus--and auto racing. They give us gators and skeeters. They give us juicy oranges and James Brown. Are you prepared for what they intend to give us next? For example, baseball? For the past 100 years, Florida has been to major league baseball what Nebraska has been to surfing.
SPORTS
August 20, 1992
A St. Petersburg, Fla., official said today his city is examining the possibility of suing San Francisco for interference if the proposed move of the Giants to Florida is not approved. Rick Dodge, St. Petersburg's assistant city manager, said his city's lawyers have determined that San Francisco's efforts to retain the team already have interfered with the deal announced Aug. 7 in which Bob Lurie would sell the club to a Florida group. "The ownership group and St.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Outside ballpark gates, schools of fans wait patiently for autographs. Inside, millionaire outfielders and rookie shortstops stretch languidly on the grass. Once again major league baseball has come to Central Florida for the rites of spring training. And under the cobalt-blue skies of the Sunshine State, it's easy to believe that all's right with the world. On this morning, Jerry A.
SPORTS
August 20, 1992 | DAVE KINDRED, THE SPORTING NEWS
It's all but impossible for an outsider to get emotional about a baseball team leaving one town to play in another. The good baseball fans of San Francisco may weep about their Giants. We can understand their sadness. But baseball has taught us one lesson well: It's a business first, a game last. And when business is bad, businesses go out of business. That, or they move to a new corner with a sign announcing new management. The new corner in the Giants' case is 3,000 miles away.
SPORTS
August 20, 1992
A St. Petersburg, Fla., official said today his city is examining the possibility of suing San Francisco for interference if the proposed move of the Giants to Florida is not approved. Rick Dodge, St. Petersburg's assistant city manager, said his city's lawyers have determined that San Francisco's efforts to retain the team already have interfered with the deal announced Aug. 7 in which Bob Lurie would sell the club to a Florida group. "The ownership group and St.
SPORTS
August 14, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
Florida and Georgia are fine states. They give us beaches and peaches. They give us greyhound racing--the dog, not the bus--and auto racing. They give us gators and skeeters. They give us juicy oranges and James Brown. Are you prepared for what they intend to give us next? For example, baseball? For the past 100 years, Florida has been to major league baseball what Nebraska has been to surfing.
SPORTS
February 8, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Washington Gov. Booth Gardner predicted that baseball owners will approve the sale of the Seattle Mariners to a group led by a Japanese industrialist because they want to avoid possible legal action. "My instincts are that, in the end, they will approve the ownership proposal," Gardner said. "The ownership group doesn't want legal action, and baseball doesn't want legal action." A group dominated by Hiroshi Yamauchi, president of Nintendo Co. Ltd. of Kyoto.
SPORTS
September 15, 1989 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Noting the benches that used to line its downtown streets, critics once dismissed this sleepy retirement community as "Heaven's waiting room." According to the local joke, people "had one foot in the grave and the other in St. Petersburg." Those sitting on the benches, reported a travel magazine in the 1950s, rode a "streetcar going nowhere." The city's image has changed somewhat since then, and is probably going to change more.
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