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SPORTS
July 28, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
On a walk down this city's million-ruble mile, Nevsky Prospect, one cannot help but notice, just behind the Koff beer garden, a magnificent early 19th-Century Lutheran church with two bell towers and a cross that dates back to, oh, about June 29. From this church once emanated some of the world's most inspiring music, played on a famous organ that since has disappeared. The sound one hears now is of jackhammers. A look inside reveals an Olympic-sized swimming pool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2004 | Lewis Segal
The Russian city where Georgi Melitonovich Balanchivadze was born a little over 100 years ago will pay tribute to him June 2 to 5 when the international ballet symposium "Balanchine: Past, Present and Future" takes place at the Hermitage Theatre in St. Petersburg.
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SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
After six hours in the sun while watching the triathlon competition, Susan, an American who is here working for the Goodwill Games, was hot and tired. She was hardly looking forward to the hour or more that she was about to spend on a bus to get back into the city. But her companion for the day, a young woman from St. Petersburg who is serving as a Goodwill Games volunteer, seemed to be enjoying the excursion into the Russian countryside.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Furry-hatted fishermen emerge like humpbacked trolls from stands of birch and pine at the shoreline. They carry stiff, square backpacks and strange, 5-foot-long corkscrews. They trudge out onto the ice, a white and gray expanse that glows faintly and stretches to the horizon. For the most part, they walk alone and they walk for miles. They read the ice like oracles, seeking signs of life and tremblings of death. Most come back alive. But every year dozens, perhaps hundreds, do not.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2004 | Lewis Segal
The Russian city where Georgi Melitonovich Balanchivadze was born a little over 100 years ago will pay tribute to him June 2 to 5 when the international ballet symposium "Balanchine: Past, Present and Future" takes place at the Hermitage Theatre in St. Petersburg.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's last czar and the family and servants who died with him should be buried with imperial grandeur in their native St. Petersburg on July 17--80 years to the day after their execution--a special state panel ruled Friday. The recommendation to Russian President Boris N.
SPORTS
August 4, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
Goodwill Games President Jack Kelly, who not only has deferred to members of the St. Petersburg Organizing Committee but defended them against criticism from the local and foreign media, finally lost his cool. That gave him something in common with the Yubileiny Sports Palace.
NEWS
March 17, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian army cannot afford enough bread to feed its soldiers. The Defense Ministry cannot find the funds to pay its bills. Fighter planes lack gasoline. Troops lack winter coats. There's no money for shoes, for butter, for housing. So it is not surprising that the Russian military cannot afford to safely dismantle the uncounted tons of surplus weapons scattered around this stately city.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1995 | From Reuters
St. Petersburg, Russia's main shipping outlet to the West, is struggling to weather a storm of competition from neighboring nations, amid a dearth of funds for reconstruction and expansion. The port, founded by Peter the Great nearly 300 years ago, is racing against time to meet the challenge. "Finland and the Baltics want to steal our business," port director Anatoly Bilichenko said. St. Petersburg can handle more than 14.
SPORTS
July 29, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
This city's mayor, Anatoly Sobchak, blames the Western media for St. Petersburg's image as a burgeoning crime capital. In fact, the most graphic report of crime here, as well as in other Russian cities, came in the form of a U.S. State Department advisory to Americans living in or visiting the country.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's last czar and the family and servants who died with him should be buried with imperial grandeur in their native St. Petersburg on July 17--80 years to the day after their execution--a special state panel ruled Friday. The recommendation to Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
March 17, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian army cannot afford enough bread to feed its soldiers. The Defense Ministry cannot find the funds to pay its bills. Fighter planes lack gasoline. Troops lack winter coats. There's no money for shoes, for butter, for housing. So it is not surprising that the Russian military cannot afford to safely dismantle the uncounted tons of surplus weapons scattered around this stately city.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1995 | From Reuters
St. Petersburg, Russia's main shipping outlet to the West, is struggling to weather a storm of competition from neighboring nations, amid a dearth of funds for reconstruction and expansion. The port, founded by Peter the Great nearly 300 years ago, is racing against time to meet the challenge. "Finland and the Baltics want to steal our business," port director Anatoly Bilichenko said. St. Petersburg can handle more than 14.
SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
After six hours in the sun while watching the triathlon competition, Susan, an American who is here working for the Goodwill Games, was hot and tired. She was hardly looking forward to the hour or more that she was about to spend on a bus to get back into the city. But her companion for the day, a young woman from St. Petersburg who is serving as a Goodwill Games volunteer, seemed to be enjoying the excursion into the Russian countryside.
SPORTS
August 4, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
Goodwill Games President Jack Kelly, who not only has deferred to members of the St. Petersburg Organizing Committee but defended them against criticism from the local and foreign media, finally lost his cool. That gave him something in common with the Yubileiny Sports Palace.
SPORTS
July 29, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
This city's mayor, Anatoly Sobchak, blames the Western media for St. Petersburg's image as a burgeoning crime capital. In fact, the most graphic report of crime here, as well as in other Russian cities, came in the form of a U.S. State Department advisory to Americans living in or visiting the country.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Furry-hatted fishermen emerge like humpbacked trolls from stands of birch and pine at the shoreline. They carry stiff, square backpacks and strange, 5-foot-long corkscrews. They trudge out onto the ice, a white and gray expanse that glows faintly and stretches to the horizon. For the most part, they walk alone and they walk for miles. They read the ice like oracles, seeking signs of life and tremblings of death. Most come back alive. But every year dozens, perhaps hundreds, do not.
SPORTS
July 28, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY
On a walk down this city's million-ruble mile, Nevsky Prospect, one cannot help but notice, just behind the Koff beer garden, a magnificent early 19th-Century Lutheran church with two bell towers and a cross that dates back to, oh, about June 29. From this church once emanated some of the world's most inspiring music, played on a famous organ that since has disappeared. The sound one hears now is of jackhammers. A look inside reveals an Olympic-sized swimming pool.
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