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Saint Petersburg Ussr

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NEWS
September 8, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet news agency Tass on Saturday dropped Leningrad in favor of St. Petersburg for the dateline on its reports from Russia's second city. Russia on Friday decreed that Leningrad could revert to its pre-revolutionary name--a move the people of the city voted for in a referendum last year.
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NEWS
December 23, 1991 | NATALYA SHULYAKOVSKAYA and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventy-eight-year-old Anna P. Mochalova rested her exhausted body on an empty shelf in Supermarket No. 45, one of the best-stocked grocery stores in this city of 5 million people. She had waited for two hours in the bitter cold just to get in the store and had asked someone to hold her place in a 90-minute line while she rested on the shelf. Her goal: to buy two kilograms of sausage, 4.
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NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the starkest sign yet that fear of a winter famine is starting to grip this crumbling nation, panic buying and hoarding of bread has begun here in response to rumors that bread rationing may soon be imposed on the Soviet Union's second-largest city. The bread panic here appears far worse than any that has hit Moscow so far this fall and provides dramatic evidence that Soviet consumers are rapidly losing faith in their nation's ability to feed itself during the long winter months.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the starkest sign yet that fear of a winter famine is starting to grip this crumbling nation, panic buying and hoarding of bread has begun here in response to rumors that bread rationing may soon be imposed on the Soviet Union's second-largest city. The bread panic here appears far worse than any that has hit Moscow so far this fall and provides dramatic evidence that Soviet consumers are rapidly losing faith in their nation's ability to feed itself during the long winter months.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Presidium of the new Supreme Soviet said the name change voted by residents of Leningrad to the city's pre-revolutionary name, St. Petersburg, will take effect immediately. Some history: * Residents voted last spring to restore the name, but the decision was deemed to require national approval, which was withheld. * The city was originally called St. Petersburg for Czar Peter the Great, who founded it in 1703.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The embalmed body of V . I. Lenin may soon be removed from the marble mausoleum on Red Square where it has been displayed since his death in 1924. * Leningrad Mayor Anatoly Sobchak proposed that Lenin should be reburied "with all due honors" next to his mother and other relatives in the city's Volkhovskoye Cemetery. The new Soviet legislature will be asked to approve. * The move would have great symbolic impact.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | NATALYA SHULYAKOVSKAYA and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seventy-eight-year-old Anna P. Mochalova rested her exhausted body on an empty shelf in Supermarket No. 45, one of the best-stocked grocery stores in this city of 5 million people. She had waited for two hours in the bitter cold just to get in the store and had asked someone to hold her place in a 90-minute line while she rested on the shelf. Her goal: to buy two kilograms of sausage, 4.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands and waxen face lit by a ghostly glow against the black marble walls of his tomb, the goateed founder of the Soviet Union still lay in state on Saturday in his Red Square mausoleum, just as he has for the last 67 years. But outside, among the lines of visitors that police say have suddenly grown longer in the last two weeks, the word was out that Vladimir Ilyich Lenin's remaining days above ground are numbered.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet news agency Tass on Saturday dropped Leningrad in favor of St. Petersburg for the dateline on its reports from Russia's second city. Russia on Friday decreed that Leningrad could revert to its pre-revolutionary name--a move the people of the city voted for in a referendum last year.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The embalmed body of V . I. Lenin may soon be removed from the marble mausoleum on Red Square where it has been displayed since his death in 1924. * Leningrad Mayor Anatoly Sobchak proposed that Lenin should be reburied "with all due honors" next to his mother and other relatives in the city's Volkhovskoye Cemetery. The new Soviet legislature will be asked to approve. * The move would have great symbolic impact.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands and waxen face lit by a ghostly glow against the black marble walls of his tomb, the goateed founder of the Soviet Union still lay in state on Saturday in his Red Square mausoleum, just as he has for the last 67 years. But outside, among the lines of visitors that police say have suddenly grown longer in the last two weeks, the word was out that Vladimir Ilyich Lenin's remaining days above ground are numbered.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Presidium of the new Supreme Soviet said the name change voted by residents of Leningrad to the city's pre-revolutionary name, St. Petersburg, will take effect immediately. Some history: * Residents voted last spring to restore the name, but the decision was deemed to require national approval, which was withheld. * The city was originally called St. Petersburg for Czar Peter the Great, who founded it in 1703.
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