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Saint Vincent College

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May 11, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush could hardly have picked a better private liberal arts college to find a welcoming audience for a commencement address than St. Vincent, a Catholic school run by a loyal former White House aide in a conservative region. Yet consider what has taken place here since Bush was invited for today's speech: Students vigorously debated the invitation at a town-hall meeting last month. A former St.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush could hardly have picked a better private liberal arts college to find a welcoming audience for a commencement address than St. Vincent, a Catholic school run by a loyal former White House aide in a conservative region. Yet consider what has taken place here since Bush was invited for today's speech: Students vigorously debated the invitation at a town-hall meeting last month. A former St.
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NEWS
March 29, 2009 | Ramit Plushnick-Masti, Plushnick-Masti writes for the Associated Press.
Third-generation car dealers Gregory and Randolph Graham watched helplessly over the last year as their business collapsed under the weight of the recession. Now the Graham brothers are gone too. Gregory, 61, went out to the dealership lot in the middle of the night last month, set fire to some of his vehicles and died of a heart attack next to the burning wreckage. Weeks later, Randolph, 51, was found dead, slumped over the wheel of his car in what may have been a suicide. In this western Pennsylvania town of 1,700, residents say the Grahams were victims of the economy, crushed by tight credit, plunging sales and more than $1 million in state and federal tax liens against the business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2006 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
ON Sept. 16, 1912, the very first issue of USC's Daily Southern Californian (now known as the Daily Trojan) declared on page 3: "Cafeteria Improved." The primary advancement was "shiny new devises for keeping eatables hot," and the article was unsigned, possibly to save the writer from a big razzing by classmates. Students, after all, have always complained about food. They griped in the Middle Ages and they griped in Colonial days.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In the ongoing battle over the future of American academia, the conservative movement is about to launch new weapons: guidebooks to help prospective college students choose a school. Both William F. Buckley's National Review magazine and the Madison Center for Educational Affairs, whose founders include former U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett and conservative scholar Allan Bloom, are publishing books that purport to lead students to solid, traditional educations.
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