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Saira Shah

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November 10, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
The daughter of Idries Shah, a writer of Sufi fables, Saira Shah was born and raised in England but nurtured on a diet of her father's enthralling stories of the homeland she had never seen: a land of snowcapped mountains, flowing streams, splendid gardens and jewel-like cities where her father's family had lived for 900 years. This lost Eden was called Afghanistan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
The daughter of Idries Shah, a writer of Sufi fables, Saira Shah was born and raised in England but nurtured on a diet of her father's enthralling stories of the homeland she had never seen: a land of snowcapped mountains, flowing streams, splendid gardens and jewel-like cities where her father's family had lived for 900 years. This lost Eden was called Afghanistan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, British documentary maker Saira (pronounced Sigh-ra) Shah had just returned from reporting on death squads in Colombia and was casting around for her next project. It wasn't going to be about Afghanistan. Today, the 37-year-old Shah, a freelancer who previously worked for Britain's Channel Four news, has become one of the media names most closely identified with the country, with an extraordinary platform to influence public opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2001
After having seen Saira Shah's documentary "Beneath the Veil," I imagine that we can expect more of the same in her latest, "Unholy War" ("Lifting the Veil Again," Nov. 17). Beyond "Beneath the Veil's" blatant and inappropriate use of background music--whose only conceivable purpose was to sway viewers' emotions in this "objective" documentary--Shah too often resorted to suspect hand-held "verite"-style camera work, even when the context of the scene clearly indicated that a hidden camera wasn't necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2001
After having seen Saira Shah's documentary "Beneath the Veil," I imagine that we can expect more of the same in her latest, "Unholy War" ("Lifting the Veil Again," Nov. 17). Beyond "Beneath the Veil's" blatant and inappropriate use of background music--whose only conceivable purpose was to sway viewers' emotions in this "objective" documentary--Shah too often resorted to suspect hand-held "verite"-style camera work, even when the context of the scene clearly indicated that a hidden camera wasn't necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Beneath the Veil," London-based documentarian Saira Shah takes a personal trip back to the homeland of her father and delivers a critical look at the difficult life, for women in particular, under the ruling Taliban in Afghanistan. The film is seeing new life in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks on the East Coast, and their probable connection to Afghanistan, which has given sanctuary to prime suspect Osama bin Laden. Tonight at 8 and Sunday at 4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
"How would it feel to be shot?" reporter Saira Shah asks Ahmed, a Palestinian boy living in Rafah, a slum on the Gaza Strip. He has no answer. He knows how to make a homemade bomb and has practiced holding a rocket on his shoulders; he knows that the Israelis are the godless enemy. He knows a lot. But the boy's eyes betray his fear. He wants to be a lookout at night for Palestinian militants battling Israeli tanks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2001 | Elaine Dutka
POP/ROCK The Latin Grammy Awards, at Last Winners of the second annual Latin Grammy Awards will finally be announced Tuesday at a news conference scheduled for the Conga Room in Los Angeles. The awards ceremony, originally scheduled Sept. 11, had been canceled after the terrorist attacks that morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, British documentary maker Saira (pronounced Sigh-ra) Shah had just returned from reporting on death squads in Colombia and was casting around for her next project. It wasn't going to be about Afghanistan. Today, the 37-year-old Shah, a freelancer who previously worked for Britain's Channel Four news, has become one of the media names most closely identified with the country, with an extraordinary platform to influence public opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Beneath the Veil," London-based documentarian Saira Shah takes a personal trip back to the homeland of her father and delivers a critical look at the difficult life, for women in particular, under the ruling Taliban in Afghanistan. The film is seeing new life in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks on the East Coast, and their probable connection to Afghanistan, which has given sanctuary to prime suspect Osama bin Laden. Tonight at 8 and Sunday at 4 p.m.
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