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Sakhalin

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NEWS
March 16, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Even wages that are double what they pay in Moscow are not enough to attract workers to fill all the jobs on Sakhalin, the big island off the Soviet Pacific coast. For Sakhalin is no resort. It is plagued by hurricanes and severe weather. Ice and snow are a problem for eight months of the year. In January, for instance, a blizzard cut off communications with the mainland and halted all outdoor work and activity.
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BUSINESS
December 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Russia's state-controlled natural gas monopoly wrested control of the country's largest foreign investment from Shell on Thursday, taking a majority stake in the Sakhalin-2 project for $7.45 billion in a deal that consolidates the Kremlin's command over national energy resources. The agreement, announced at a Kremlin meeting between President Vladimir V.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exxon Corp., together with the Japanese government and several major Japanese companies, appears to be on the verge of winning approval from Soviet authorities to explore for oil and gas on Sakhalin Island off the Siberian coast, an area off-limits to foreign oil explorers for the past 70 years but considered one of the most promising untapped oil fields in the world.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2006 | From Reuters
Royal Dutch Shell has offered to cede control of the $22-billion Sakhalin-2 project, Russia's biggest single foreign investment, to state gas monopoly Gazprom after months of government pressure, industry sources said Monday. Such a deal would appear to mark a victory for the Kremlin, determined to wrest control over the "commanding heights" of the Russian economy, and a retreat by Shell.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
American and Japanese entrepreneurs are making deals in the desolate Soviet Far East, best known to outsiders as the area where border gunners shot down a Korean Airlines jumbo jet. Most foreign investment in the resource-rich, lightly populated region is still in the start-up stage. Moscow sees foreign trade and foreign investment as ways to boost the Soviet economy, although so far no large-scale foreign projects have been started in the Soviet sector of the booming Pacific Basin.
NEWS
October 10, 1985 | MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writer
Yul Brynner, who with shaved head and regally haughty presence played and replayed the starring role in "The King and I" for more than 30 years, died early today in a New York Hospital. He was 65. With him when he died at 1 a.m. at the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center were his wife, Kathy Lee, and his four children, said Josh Ellis, the actor's spokesman. "He died of multiple complications that came as a result of what was originally cancer," Ellis said. "He faced death with a dignity and strength that astounded his doctors.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A few years ago, this spindly island that Russia wears like a holstered gun on its eastern hip was as close to nowhere as anyone could imagine. Eight time zones from Moscow, Sakhalin Island was best known for the day in 1983 when a South Korean airliner strayed too close to a top-secret Soviet military installation and got shot out of the sky. Playwright Anton Chekhov had a one-word description when he visited in 1890: "Hell."
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest potential deal so far between foreign energy companies and the Russian energy industry, a U.S.-Japanese consortium has won the international competition to explore two big oil and gas fields on Sakhalin Island, off the Siberian coast. After months of rumors and speculation, the MMM Group--comprised of Marathon Oil Co. and McDermott International Inc., both U.S. firms, and Mitsui & Co.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | Associated Press
A strong earthquake shook Sakhalin Island in the eastern Soviet Union on Saturday. No injuries or serious damage were reported. The temblor overturned furniture in homes on the sparsely populated island and was felt 900 miles to the south in northern Japan, according to Japan's Central Meteorological Agency. Meteorologists in Japan said the quake had a magnitude of 7.7 and struck deep below the eastern coast of Sakhalin. The U.S. Geological Survey in Washington said the temblor measured 6.7.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A few years ago, this spindly island that Russia wears like a holstered gun on its eastern hip was as close to nowhere as anyone could imagine. Eight time zones from Moscow, Sakhalin Island was best known for the day in 1983 when a South Korean airliner strayed too close to a top-secret Soviet military installation and got shot out of the sky. Playwright Anton Chekhov had a one-word description when he visited in 1890: "Hell."
BUSINESS
September 24, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Exxon Mobil Corp., the world's largest publicly traded oil company, may develop a second oil field off Russia's Pacific coast, provided Russia changes its laws on exploration licenses. Exxon may seek an exploration license for the Sakhalin-3 fields, close to the $15-billion Sakhalin-1 project where Exxon expects to start pumping oil in 2006.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A soldier high on acetone fumes went on a rampage and killed seven fellow servicemen at a remote base on the Pacific island of Sakhalin, military officials reported Tuesday in describing the latest of at least 10 multiple slayings in the disintegrating army over the past two years.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | Associated Press
A series of tremors shook Sakhalin Island just a day after rescuers ended their search for victims of an earthquake two weeks ago that killed more than 1,800 people, a news agency reported Saturday. Interfax said a local seismic station had recorded 100 tremors, many of them tiny, since Friday. The strongest was a magnitude 4, it said. The May quake was a magnitude 7.5 and wiped out the oil town of Neftegorsk on the northern end of the island in Russia's Far East.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | From Reuters
The known death toll from the earthquake that devastated Russia's Far Eastern oil town of Neftegorsk passed the 1,000 mark Saturday as fresh tremors rippled through the region. Emergencies ministry officials on Sakhalin island said after another day of work lifting rubble in the shattered town that the number of dead now found stood at 1,026. The bodies of 11 children were among those recovered Saturday. About 2,000 people in all are feared to have died. A 4.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 300 people were killed Sunday and hundreds more were feared buried under rubble after a powerful earthquake devastated a small town on Sakhalin Island in Russia's Far East just north of Japan, news reports said. The Itar-Tass news agency said 300 people were confirmed dead, and officials estimated that up to 2,500 people may have been killed or injured in the 7.5-magnitude quake off Russia's east coast. The temblor struck at 1:03 a.m.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | Associated Press
A series of tremors shook Sakhalin Island just a day after rescuers ended their search for victims of an earthquake two weeks ago that killed more than 1,800 people, a news agency reported Saturday. Interfax said a local seismic station had recorded 100 tremors, many of them tiny, since Friday. The strongest was a magnitude 4, it said. The May quake was a magnitude 7.5 and wiped out the oil town of Neftegorsk on the northern end of the island in Russia's Far East.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Times Staff Writer
During World War II, the Japanese who ruled Korea uprooted 43,000 Koreans and sent them to work in the coal mines of southern Sakhalin, the big island north of Japan. Although 40 years have passed, very few of them have ever made it back home. After the war, southern Sakhalin was taken over by the Soviet Union, and Moscow has steadfastly refused to repatriate the Koreans. The Koreans have not been forgotten, though.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest potential deal so far between foreign energy companies and the Russian energy industry, a U.S.-Japanese consortium has won the international competition to explore two big oil and gas fields on Sakhalin Island, off the Siberian coast. After months of rumors and speculation, the MMM Group--comprised of Marathon Oil Co. and McDermott International Inc., both U.S. firms, and Mitsui & Co.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exxon Corp., together with the Japanese government and several major Japanese companies, appears to be on the verge of winning approval from Soviet authorities to explore for oil and gas on Sakhalin Island off the Siberian coast, an area off-limits to foreign oil explorers for the past 70 years but considered one of the most promising untapped oil fields in the world.
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