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Sal Castro

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April 15, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Salvador Castro, a social studies teacher who played a leading role in the historic 1968 Chicano student walkouts protesting rampant bias and inequalities in the Los Angeles Unified School District, died Monday, the district announced. He was 79. Castro, known as “Sal,” was a Lincoln High School teacher who guided student walkouts at five predominantly Mexican American schools on the Eastside in what came to be seen as a milestone in community activism. The students demanded bilingual education,   ethnic studies and other changes at a time when the curriculum largely ignored Mexican American history and educators   forbid Chicano students to speak Spanish and often steered them toward menial jobs rather than college despite strong academic abilities, according to the district.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | Dalina Castellanos
Sal Castro was praised as a tireless, inspiring leader and activist by university professors, doctors and a former California Supreme Court justice at his funeral Thursday at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. But he simply wanted to be remembered as a teacher. More than 1,000 of Castro's family, friends and admirers gathered to celebrate his life, which included the student walkouts at five predominantly Mexican American schools, mostly on the Eastside. The weeklong walkouts to protest inequalities in education for Latinos in the Los Angeles Unified School District came to be seen as a milestone in community activism.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro, a veteran Los Angeles Unified School District teacher who played a central role in the 1968 "blowouts," when more than 1,000 students in predominantly Latino high schools walked out of their classrooms to protest inequalities in education, died in his sleep Monday after a long bout with cancer. He was 79. Castro died at his home in the Silver Lake district, seven months after he was found to have stage 4 thyroid cancer, said his wife, Charlotte Lerchenmuller. In March 1968, Castro was a social studies teacher at Lincoln High School near downtown when he helped instigate the protests that became a seminal event in the development of the Chicano movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
Funeral services will be held Thursday morning for former teacher Salvador "Sal" Castro, who played a central role in the 1968 Eastside school walkouts to protest inequalities in education for Latinos in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Castro died in his sleep April 15 after a seven-month bout with cancer at the age of 79, according to his family. A 9:30 a.m. funeral Mass at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels will be led by the Rev. James Mott, pastor of Our Mother of Good Counsel Church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | Dalina Castellanos
Sal Castro was praised as a tireless, inspiring leader and activist by university professors, doctors and a former California Supreme Court justice at his funeral Thursday at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. But he simply wanted to be remembered as a teacher. More than 1,000 of Castro's family, friends and admirers gathered to celebrate his life, which included the student walkouts at five predominantly Mexican American schools, mostly on the Eastside. The weeklong walkouts to protest inequalities in education for Latinos in the Los Angeles Unified School District came to be seen as a milestone in community activism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Sal Castro went from classroom to jail cell. The Eastside social studies teacher was branded a dangerous agitator in the press — held responsible for inciting thousands of teenagers to march out of school. The district attorney slapped a bunch of conspiracy charges on him. The Board of Education voted him out of his job. All that was 42 years ago. Fast forward to Saturday, when Sal Castro will stand with Los Angeles Unified School District dignitaries and cut the ribbon at a brand-new campus: Salvador B. Castro Middle School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are times when the radical past of Chicano student militant Vickie Castro collides with the establishment world of educator and Los Angeles school board member Victoria M. Castro. One such instance was when Castro, then a middle school principal in East L.A., had to suspend three students after 400 walked out of class because they couldn't get their grades during a teachers' work stoppage.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Elnora Crowder liked to ease into her Saturdays after a week of teaching school. But on this particular day in 1963 she got up early and headed for Watts, a journey that would leave a lasting mark on the public schools of Los Angeles. When Crowder approached some teen-agers in a park, "They actually recoiled from me saying, 'Blacks go to a white school?' " she recalls. "It was like I was asking them to go to the moon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro sat in his book-lined den, reduced to writing on a whiteboard to fight what could be his last political battle. Hours earlier, the "usually glib and gregarious" teacher and activist, as he describes himself, had been released from St. Vincent Medical Center with a serious illness that made it difficult for him to speak. But Castro insisted on meeting with me to express his frustration with President Obama. Since 2009, Castro has been trying to get the president, first lady or Vice President Joe Biden to come to Boyle Heights to honor the students of the Eastside walkouts of 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | Chris Ceballos, (714) 966-7440
The League of United Latin American Citizens will hold a community education forum on Saturday at Saddleback High School, 2802 S. Flower St., to recognize the achievements of United Farm Workers Union leader Cesar Chavez. Speaking at the event will be Sal Castro, a student leader from the 1970s Los Angeles High School protests. The event will also feature skits, songs, dances and presentations from Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) and Rita Cepeda, president of Santa Ana College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro, a veteran Los Angeles Unified School District teacher who played a central role in the 1968 "blowouts," when more than 1,000 students in predominantly Latino high schools walked out of their classrooms to protest inequalities in education, died in his sleep Monday after a long bout with cancer. He was 79. Castro died at his home in the Silver Lake district, seven months after he was found to have stage 4 thyroid cancer, said his wife, Charlotte Lerchenmuller. In March 1968, Castro was a social studies teacher at Lincoln High School near downtown when he helped instigate the protests that became a seminal event in the development of the Chicano movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Sal Castro sat in his book-lined den, reduced to writing on a whiteboard to fight what could be his last political battle. Hours earlier, the "usually glib and gregarious" teacher and activist, as he describes himself, had been released from St. Vincent Medical Center with a serious illness that made it difficult for him to speak. But Castro insisted on meeting with me to express his frustration with President Obama. Since 2009, Castro has been trying to get the president, first lady or Vice President Joe Biden to come to Boyle Heights to honor the students of the Eastside walkouts of 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Sal Castro went from classroom to jail cell. The Eastside social studies teacher was branded a dangerous agitator in the press — held responsible for inciting thousands of teenagers to march out of school. The district attorney slapped a bunch of conspiracy charges on him. The Board of Education voted him out of his job. All that was 42 years ago. Fast forward to Saturday, when Sal Castro will stand with Los Angeles Unified School District dignitaries and cut the ribbon at a brand-new campus: Salvador B. Castro Middle School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1996 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are times when the radical past of Chicano student militant Vickie Castro collides with the establishment world of educator and Los Angeles school board member Victoria M. Castro. One such instance was when Castro, then a middle school principal in East L.A., had to suspend three students after 400 walked out of class because they couldn't get their grades during a teachers' work stoppage.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Elnora Crowder liked to ease into her Saturdays after a week of teaching school. But on this particular day in 1963 she got up early and headed for Watts, a journey that would leave a lasting mark on the public schools of Los Angeles. When Crowder approached some teen-agers in a park, "They actually recoiled from me saying, 'Blacks go to a white school?' " she recalls. "It was like I was asking them to go to the moon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1987
"Hispanic Educational Day" will be marked at Golden West College on Thursday, with 400 students from 13 area high schools invited as special guests. The day's special events are designed to help Latino students prepare for entrance to the community college. The program was designed by Golden West College's new Hispanic Education Advancement Center, which was launched last fall to assist Latino students.
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