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NEWS
August 31, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
The holiday weekend is crashing down upon us. It's time to swallow the last bit of summer before serious fall kicks in. OK, here in Los Angeles we don't really have to worry about fall, but it's the idea of the thing. Kids are in school and all that. Gas in Los Angeles is averaging $4.16 a gallon, but will that stop us from jumping in our cars to get out of town one last whirlwind? I doubt it. I'm going. To speed us along our way, here is a brand-new trailer for the movie version of Jack Kerouac's "On the Road.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2013 | By Noel Murray
On the Road Available on VOD beginning Monday Director Walter Salles, screenwriter José Rivera and producer Francis Ford Coppola have given themselves the almost-impossible task of adapting Jack Kerouac's beloved Beat Generation novel "On the Road," a fictionalized account of Kerouac's late '40s cross-country road trips with his live-wire buddy Neal Cassady. Salles shoots for a simultaneously poetic and realistic style, similar to that in his art-house hit "The Motorcycle Diaries"; and he has a good cast, with Sam Riley as Kerouac stand-in Sal Paradise, and Garrett Hedlund as the Cassady character, Dean Moriarty.
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TRAVEL
September 2, 2007 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Jack Kerouac slept where? Fifty years ago this month, the Beat Generation writer's novel "On the Road" hit bookstores, its story told in breathless, jazz-inflected cadences, its plot lifted from the author's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are as many visions of "On the Road," novelist Jack Kerouac's vivid anthem to the romance of youthful freedom and the getting of experience as there are readers. It's a book so influential yet so personal that each succeeding generation since its 1957 publication has picked it up and simply said, as one of its protagonists does, "Oh yes, oh yes, that's the way it goes. " Director Walter Salles has been one of those enthusiasts since he was an 18-year-old growing up in Brazil under a stifling military dictatorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are as many visions of "On the Road," novelist Jack Kerouac's vivid anthem to the romance of youthful freedom and the getting of experience as there are readers. It's a book so influential yet so personal that each succeeding generation since its 1957 publication has picked it up and simply said, as one of its protagonists does, "Oh yes, oh yes, that's the way it goes. " Director Walter Salles has been one of those enthusiasts since he was an 18-year-old growing up in Brazil under a stifling military dictatorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
From inside the rocket-shaped time capsule of a silver 1949 Hudson Super Six, West Hollywood looked astonishingly modern to Brazilian director Walter Salles. Salles, who has devoted the last eight years to adapting Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" for the screen, rode past men holding hands on Santa Monica Boulevard, past the green neon signs of shops selling medicinal marijuana, past a Starbucks - and another Starbucks - and another Starbucks. It was a streetscape that would have been unimaginable in Kerouac's time - both in the freedoms of the passersby and the homogeneity of the businesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2013 | By Noel Murray
On the Road Available on VOD beginning Monday Director Walter Salles, screenwriter José Rivera and producer Francis Ford Coppola have given themselves the almost-impossible task of adapting Jack Kerouac's beloved Beat Generation novel "On the Road," a fictionalized account of Kerouac's late '40s cross-country road trips with his live-wire buddy Neal Cassady. Salles shoots for a simultaneously poetic and realistic style, similar to that in his art-house hit "The Motorcycle Diaries"; and he has a good cast, with Sam Riley as Kerouac stand-in Sal Paradise, and Garrett Hedlund as the Cassady character, Dean Moriarty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - Walter Salles carefully raises the fingers of his right hand and gently strokes the back of his left. "These are characters," he says, explaining the gesture, "who experience things not vicariously but on the flesh. Men and women in a quest for something they couldn't define yet, who are trying to amplify their knowledge of the world. " More than half a century after "On the Road" was published, 30-plus years since Francis Ford Coppola bought the rights in 1978, and nearly a decade after Salles began working on the film, Jack Kerouac's peerless anthem to the romance of youthful freedom and experience has finally made it to the screen with its virtues and spirit intact.
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Question from Jan. 19: The L.A. Louver gallery in Venice is hosting an event titled "One Hour / One Painting," during which participants spend one hour looking at one piece of art. We'd like to offer this event in miniaturized form, using David Hockney's piece as a Rorschach test. In the photo collage, a road runs through the desert and signs indicate that up ahead is a stop as well as Highway 138 (Pearblossom Highway). Aside from what's really there, what else do you see?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
When Kristen Stewart emerged from a large black car Thursday night in front of Toronto's Ryerson Theatre for the North American premiere of her new movie, "On the Road," the big-screen adaptation of Jack Kerouac's classic Beat generation novel, flashbulbs popped, cellphones were raised, and then, in a moment of silence, one sound landed with a crashing thud. A single boo. It was an instant -- yet the seemingly only-- acknowledgment of the actress' recent role in the tabloids, where she's been a near constant fixture since news broke of a late-summer cheating scandal involving Stewart and filmmaker Rupert Sanders.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
From inside the rocket-shaped time capsule of a silver 1949 Hudson Super Six, West Hollywood looked astonishingly modern to Brazilian director Walter Salles. Salles, who has devoted the last eight years to adapting Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" for the screen, rode past men holding hands on Santa Monica Boulevard, past the green neon signs of shops selling medicinal marijuana, past a Starbucks - and another Starbucks - and another Starbucks. It was a streetscape that would have been unimaginable in Kerouac's time - both in the freedoms of the passersby and the homogeneity of the businesses.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
The holiday weekend is crashing down upon us. It's time to swallow the last bit of summer before serious fall kicks in. OK, here in Los Angeles we don't really have to worry about fall, but it's the idea of the thing. Kids are in school and all that. Gas in Los Angeles is averaging $4.16 a gallon, but will that stop us from jumping in our cars to get out of town one last whirlwind? I doubt it. I'm going. To speed us along our way, here is a brand-new trailer for the movie version of Jack Kerouac's "On the Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - Walter Salles carefully raises the fingers of his right hand and gently strokes the back of his left. "These are characters," he says, explaining the gesture, "who experience things not vicariously but on the flesh. Men and women in a quest for something they couldn't define yet, who are trying to amplify their knowledge of the world. " More than half a century after "On the Road" was published, 30-plus years since Francis Ford Coppola bought the rights in 1978, and nearly a decade after Salles began working on the film, Jack Kerouac's peerless anthem to the romance of youthful freedom and experience has finally made it to the screen with its virtues and spirit intact.
TRAVEL
September 2, 2007 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Jack Kerouac slept where? Fifty years ago this month, the Beat Generation writer's novel "On the Road" hit bookstores, its story told in breathless, jazz-inflected cadences, its plot lifted from the author's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Cal State Fullerton's production of David Mamet's "Edmond" starts with a lone sax man dressed up like a Blues Brother and blowing hard under a moody spotlight. The guy's not bad--the riffs are bluesy, progressive, a little off; it's the right foreshadowing for Mamet's corrosive black comedy of low-lifes and living in New York City. Yeah, mournful, urgent and a bit crazy, not bad. But it all unravels soon enough after the last notes are played.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easy to connect the cult luminaries playwright-director Joel Beers acknowledges in the program for his new play, "Indio," to the play itself. Sam Shepard, Raymond Berry, David Lynch, Lenny Bruce, Sal Paradise and Blind Boy Grunt make up the list of American fringe cool guys. The big man missing from the list, but whose presence is felt all over Beers' play about pathologies run amok in the California desert, is Quentin ("Reservoir Dogs") Tarantino.
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