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Salad Dressing

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NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
Kraft Zesty Italian dressing has been on the market for years. It's nothing new. But enter the Zesty guy with his tight white tee, tanned muscles and artfully trimmed facial hair and all of the sudden, the new Kraft dressing ad is playing on repeat.  The new Kraft dressing campaign features the Zesty guy in three different videos with the dressing. First he lights a fire with the dressing and conveniently burns his shirt off. In another video he playfully slaps some dough and again ends up shirtless.
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FOOD
February 15, 2014
Beet and fennel salad 50 minutes. Serves 6 to 8 LEMON VINAIGRETTE 2 tablespoons shallots, finely chopped 1 clove garlic, finely minced 1 tablespoon lemon zest (1 to 2 lemons) 5 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed 2 tablespoons agave syrup or honey (to taste) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil In a medium bowl, whisk together the shallots, garlic, lemon zest, lemon juice, agave syrup, salt and pepper, then slowly whisk in the olive oil to emulsify.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The T. Marzetti Co. is recalling some 12-ounce bottles of Girard's Honey Dijon Peppercorn salad dressing because the bottles may have incorrect labels that don't list eggs among the ingredients. Marzetti says people who have egg allergies run the risk of a serious reaction if they consume the product. Marzetti says the recalled dressing was distributed throughout the Western U.S., primarily California, Washington, Oregon and Arizona. The bottles have the "Best By" date code 06-11-09M.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Pinnacle Foods Inc., owner of brands such as Hungry Man dinners and Duncan Hines baking mixes, is buying the Wish-Bone salad dressing brands from Unilever for $580 million. The deal, funded by cash and new debt, comes as Unilever readjusts its priorities to beauty and health goods from food products. In January, the company, which is based in the Netherlands and Britain, sold its Skippy peanut butter brand to Spam maker Hormel Foods for $700 million. Now Pinnacle, which is based in Parsippany, N.J., will take on Wish-Bone as well as the Western brand of dressings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993 | RON HARRIS
Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti is talking about white backlash, my friend Angela says she hasn't recovered from white frontlash and my ex-girlfriend can't figure out what to do with her eyelash. " Buy a bottle of salad dressing . Send a kid to college ." Whoa, whiplash. What in the world are we talking about now? "Food," said Melinda McMullen. "Food From the 'Hood."
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
As temperatures were hitting record highs in the city on Aug. 13-14, a group of student entrepreneurs were busy turning up the heat to promote their salad dressing at the latest market chain to sell their product: Mrs. Gooch's health food stores.
MAGAZINE
November 5, 2000
S. Irene Virbila complained about the scarcity of avocado in her serving of Green Goddess salad dressing ("All's OK at Chez Jay," Oct. 8). This could be due to the fact that Green Goddess dressing isn't supposed to have any avocado in it. It was invented at San Francisco's Palace Hotel and named in honor of George Arliss, who was starring in the play "The Green Goddess." Jim Chilton Chatsworth
BUSINESS
May 29, 1987
The two companies announced that Kraft will pay $235 million for the Anderson Clayton Foods Division. The businesses in the division going to Kraft include Seven Seas salad dressing, Purity cheeses, Anderson Clayton edible oils, Chiffon margarine and Avoset food packing. Quaker bought the Anderson Clayton division last year solely to obtain the Gaines pet food business and planned from the start to sell off the other operations, said William D. Smithburg, chairman and chief executive of Quaker.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Paul Newman's legal rematch begins with jury selection next Wednesday in Bridgeport, Conn. The actor and businessman is being sued by Westport deli owner Julius Gold, who wants a share of Newman's food business because he claims he helped develop it. The first trial, which featured testimony from Newman himself, ended in a mistrial in 1988 after jurors were inadvertently given documents that had been ruled inadmissible.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Driven by a proliferation of low-fat, low-cholesterol foods, Monsanto Co. said today it will speed the marketing of Simplesse, a low-calorie cholesterol-free fat substitute, as an ingredient for other food products. Simplesse Co., which currently markets its own line of frozen desserts under the Simple Pleasures brand, expects regulatory approval soon to use the egg white and milk-based ingredient in cheese, sour cream, yogurt, salad dressing, mayonnaise and refrigerated desserts.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
Kraft Zesty Italian dressing has been on the market for years. It's nothing new. But enter the Zesty guy with his tight white tee, tanned muscles and artfully trimmed facial hair and all of the sudden, the new Kraft dressing ad is playing on repeat.  The new Kraft dressing campaign features the Zesty guy in three different videos with the dressing. First he lights a fire with the dressing and conveniently burns his shirt off. In another video he playfully slaps some dough and again ends up shirtless.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Dieters often say, “Hold the dressing,” but hold on: That might make those virtuous vegetables less nutritious, a study shows. Researchers at Purdue University found that some fat matters - and that the kind of fat matters too. For the study, 29 people ate salads topped with dressings that had varying fats: saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Each salad was served with 3 grams, 8 grams or 20 grams of fat from dressing. The researchers tested the diners' blood to learn how well they absorbed compounds such as lycopene and beta-carotene, which are associated with a reduced risk of problems such as cancer and heart disease.
FOOD
February 24, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: I'm hoping the chef at PizzaVino , a lovely little restaurant on the plaza in Sebastopol, Calif., will share his secret for the most delicious crunchy croutons I've ever tasted. It seems as if many of us "Hail, Caesar"! Carol Bloom Woodland Hills Dear Carol: The secret to PizzaVino's croutons is focaccia, which makes the croutons extra light and crisp when toasted. Tossed with tender lettuce in a tangy Caesar dressing, this salad makes a refreshing side dish or light meal.
FOOD
May 6, 2009 | Noelle Carter
Marinade: It's one of those culinary terms that evokes an aura of kitchen mystique, as if throwing together a bunch of liquids, flavorings, herbs and spices will magically transform meat, fish or even vegetables into tender dishes bursting with flavor. It sounds almost like a kitchen spell -- albeit without the dramatic incantations, or the smoke (better save that for the grill). Unfortunately, in the real world, marinades have their limitations.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The T. Marzetti Co. is recalling some 12-ounce bottles of Girard's Honey Dijon Peppercorn salad dressing because the bottles may have incorrect labels that don't list eggs among the ingredients. Marzetti says people who have egg allergies run the risk of a serious reaction if they consume the product. Marzetti says the recalled dressing was distributed throughout the Western U.S., primarily California, Washington, Oregon and Arizona. The bottles have the "Best By" date code 06-11-09M.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Commentator and former presidential candidate Pat Buchanan cut short an appearance in Kalamazoo after an opponent of his conservative views doused him with salad dressing. "Stop the bigotry!" the demonstrator shouted as he hurled the liquid during the program at Western Michigan University. After he was hit, Buchanan cut short his question-and-answer session, saying, "Thank you all for coming, but I'm going to have to get my hair washed."
FOOD
June 30, 1994 | CHARLES PERRY
For the last three and a half years, Beano has been a boon. You just measure a few drops of it on your beans or cabbage at the beginning of the meal and presto, no gas. (In effect, it corrects our bodies' inability to digest the complex sugars that cause gas.) The problem, for some people, is the inconvenience of hauling out a bottle and a dropper, so it's now available in chewable tablet form. It's at Sav-On, Payless and Thrifty stores, as well as many pharmacies and health food stores.
FOOD
April 30, 2003
As a child of the '60s, I remember the occasional visit to the neighborhood McDonald's ("The Super-Sized Culture," April 9). I also remember eating my share of cupcakes, ice cream and soft drinks, as did a lot of my contemporaries. I also remember there weren't too many overweight kids in the school I attended, as we spent our spare time outside playing, riding our bikes or playing sports. If I needed to walk a mile or two to get somewhere, that's what I (and my friends) did. Of course, we did not have PlayStations, Nintendo 64, Xboxes, nor any sort of video or computer games whose computer-generated characters do more moving around than the players do all month.
MAGAZINE
April 25, 2004 | CHRIS RUBIN, Chris Rubin last wrote for the magazine about Grand Marnier.
Like most Americans, I was only dimly aware of verjuice. Then, several years ago, I was experimenting in a friend's kitchen and came upon some. I vaguely knew it was made from grapes and was related to both wine and vinegar, so I splashed some into a baked chicken dish and was pleased with the extra burst of flavor it provided. Adding flavor is what verjuice does best. And it does so without some of the drawbacks of cooking with wine or vinegar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Rosa Maria Cardini, who with her father, Caesar, turned their recipe for Caesar salad into a multimillion-dollar business, died Sept. 3 at Grossmont Hospital in San Diego. She was 75 and had been hospitalized with kidney failure. Born in San Diego in 1928, Cardini was 10 when her father moved the family to Los Angeles. She soon began to work with him, bottling his Caesar salad dressing at home, labeling it by hand and selling it from the family station wagon at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles.
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