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February 9, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The Muslim women in Marwa Adel's photographs are shadows, repressed by custom, religion, marriage and regret. While nude, the figures are obscured by sepia scrims, scrawled upon with stifling words - as if their true selves may never be known. Like their creator, a single mother edging at the bounds of artistic freedom in a patriarchal society, the images are at once vulnerable and defiant. A man from the Muslim Brotherhood, the nation's dominant political force, which is infusing Islam into a once-secular government, scolded her at a recent exhibition.
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WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The military coup that ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood this week could open the way for an even more conservative Islamist faction to make a run for the Egyptian leadership. Nader Bakar of the ultraconservative Nour Party backed progressive Islamists during last year's political campaigns but may be less inclined this time around to stifle aims of bringing the purest form of Islam into the politics of a country whose population is 90% Muslim. As Egypt again braces for elections, Nour and other Salafi parties can be expected to advance their agendas against a revival of secular and moderate voices rising from an opposition backed by the army.
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WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- A leading opponent of Tunisia's Islamist-led government was assassinated in front of his home Wednesday, raising fears of sharpening political turmoil in the country that ignited the Arab Spring movement but remains starkly divided between liberals and Islamists. Chokri Belaid, head of the Unified Democratic Nationalist Party, was shot on his way to work in the capital, Tunis, according to authorities. No one claimed immediate responsibility for the attack, but it comes as Tunisia faces a troubled economy and a restive transition to democracy after decades of dictatorship.   "This is a criminal act, and an act of terrorism not only against Belaid but against the whole of Tunisia," Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali told a radio station.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - When he took the stage at a campaign stop last year, Nader Bakar moved with a polished grace that defied the brimstone stereotype of an ultraconservative Islamist. Lithe and bearded, Bakar was appearing at a rally supporting a progressive Islamist presidential candidate, even as his Nour party envisioned Egypt as an Islamic state. The candidate lost, but Nour, savvier than its bigger and more moderate rival, the Muslim Brotherhood, showed a political nimbleness rare among Egypt's religious movements.
WORLD
August 30, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
SIDI BOUZID, Tunisia - Bearded and sweaty, they pressed in, their faces shining in the shadow and light beneath billowing tunics hanging for sale outside a mosque. The sun edged higher. A veiled woman hurried past and a boy stepped closer to listen to men complain about no jobs in fields or factories, no water in thousands of homes. "I didn't trust the old government and I don't trust the new one. They lie. I trust in another revolution," said Khalid Ahmedi, his disgust sharpening as shopkeepers slipped past him to pray.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The military coup that ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood this week could open the way for an even more conservative Islamist faction to make a run for the Egyptian leadership. Nader Bakar of the ultraconservative Nour Party backed progressive Islamists during last year's political campaigns but may be less inclined this time around to stifle aims of bringing the purest form of Islam into the politics of a country whose population is 90% Muslim. As Egypt again braces for elections, Nour and other Salafi parties can be expected to advance their agendas against a revival of secular and moderate voices rising from an opposition backed by the army.
OPINION
December 9, 2012 | By Robin Wright
The most enduring image from my travels across the Middle East this year was a Libyan street lined with bridal boutiques. Mannequins in bouffant white dresses, with beaded bustiers and satin rosettes, evoked Cinderella transformed by her ball gown. Outside, however, the street was lined with heaping piles of garbage wrapped in tatty plastic bags. Tripoli literally stank. On the second anniversary of the Arab uprisings, millions across the Middle East still have dreams of makeovers.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Radhouane Addala, Los Angeles Times
TUNIS, Tunisia - The assassination of a leading opposition figure in Tunisia on Wednesday triggered protests across the nation and raised fresh concern about the legacy of the "Arab Spring," the pro-democracy movement now threatened in several countries by turmoil between Islamists and secular liberals. Chokri Belaid, head of the Democratic Patriots party, was shot on his way to work in Tunis, the capital, the day after he predicted a wave of political assassinations. No one claimed responsibility for the attack, but it came amid a democratic transition endangered by Islamist hard-liners with caches of smuggled weapons.
WORLD
October 7, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Eman Mostafa, a village girl from southern Egypt, was shot and killed last month when she dared to spit in the face of the man who groped her. Ramadan Salem told authorities he mistakenly shot Mostafa, 16, after she cursed him. It is uncertain whether Salem will be convicted: The only witness willing to testify - Mostafa's friend, Sahar Mamdouh - has been threatened in a society that often blames women and girls for provoking sexual crimes...
WORLD
November 19, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Banners waved and angry slogans echoed as tens of thousands of Egyptians protested Friday against the ruling military council, which they blame for hijacking a revolution that once bore the hope of leading the restive Arab world toward democracy. Dominated by Islamists, with a smattering of secularists and liberals, crowds swelled into Tahrir Square in one of the largest demonstrations since longtime President Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in February. Despite competing political agendas, the factions were united in condemning the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces' refusal to cede power to a civilian government.
WORLD
March 11, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The brother of Al Qaeda leader Ayman Zawahiri is an unflinching man with a graying beard whose aim, as a Salafi, is to impose Islamic law on the divided country that has emerged since the overthrow of secular autocrat Hosni Mubarak two years ago. Seated at a rooftop cafe as dusk draped the Nile, traffic screeching and lights flickering in the ancient city below, he wagged a finger in the air and spoke of an "epic battle" to scour Egypt...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The Muslim women in Marwa Adel's photographs are shadows, repressed by custom, religion, marriage and regret. While nude, the figures are obscured by sepia scrims, scrawled upon with stifling words - as if their true selves may never be known. Like their creator, a single mother edging at the bounds of artistic freedom in a patriarchal society, the images are at once vulnerable and defiant. A man from the Muslim Brotherhood, the nation's dominant political force, which is infusing Islam into a once-secular government, scolded her at a recent exhibition.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Radhouane Addala, Los Angeles Times
TUNIS, Tunisia - The assassination of a leading opposition figure in Tunisia on Wednesday triggered protests across the nation and raised fresh concern about the legacy of the "Arab Spring," the pro-democracy movement now threatened in several countries by turmoil between Islamists and secular liberals. Chokri Belaid, head of the Democratic Patriots party, was shot on his way to work in Tunis, the capital, the day after he predicted a wave of political assassinations. No one claimed responsibility for the attack, but it came amid a democratic transition endangered by Islamist hard-liners with caches of smuggled weapons.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- A leading opponent of Tunisia's Islamist-led government was assassinated in front of his home Wednesday, raising fears of sharpening political turmoil in the country that ignited the Arab Spring movement but remains starkly divided between liberals and Islamists. Chokri Belaid, head of the Unified Democratic Nationalist Party, was shot on his way to work in the capital, Tunis, according to authorities. No one claimed immediate responsibility for the attack, but it comes as Tunisia faces a troubled economy and a restive transition to democracy after decades of dictatorship.   "This is a criminal act, and an act of terrorism not only against Belaid but against the whole of Tunisia," Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali told a radio station.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's volatile political fault lines were shaken Tuesday as rival protests echoed across the capital over the fate of a proposed constitution drafted by Islamists nearly two years after the overthrow of autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Tens of thousands of Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi rallied at a mosque in Cairo to back a constitutional referendum set for Saturday. Two miles away, mainly secular opposition groups marched to the barricaded presidential palace in what increasingly appears to be an improbable task of blocking the vote and forcing Morsi to order the writing of a new charter.
OPINION
December 9, 2012 | By Robin Wright
The most enduring image from my travels across the Middle East this year was a Libyan street lined with bridal boutiques. Mannequins in bouffant white dresses, with beaded bustiers and satin rosettes, evoked Cinderella transformed by her ball gown. Outside, however, the street was lined with heaping piles of garbage wrapped in tatty plastic bags. Tripoli literally stank. On the second anniversary of the Arab uprisings, millions across the Middle East still have dreams of makeovers.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's volatile political fault lines were shaken Tuesday as rival protests echoed across the capital over the fate of a proposed constitution drafted by Islamists nearly two years after the overthrow of autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Tens of thousands of Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi rallied at a mosque in Cairo to back a constitutional referendum set for Saturday. Two miles away, mainly secular opposition groups marched to the barricaded presidential palace in what increasingly appears to be an improbable task of blocking the vote and forcing Morsi to order the writing of a new charter.
WORLD
March 11, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The brother of Al Qaeda leader Ayman Zawahiri is an unflinching man with a graying beard whose aim, as a Salafi, is to impose Islamic law on the divided country that has emerged since the overthrow of secular autocrat Hosni Mubarak two years ago. Seated at a rooftop cafe as dusk draped the Nile, traffic screeching and lights flickering in the ancient city below, he wagged a finger in the air and spoke of an "epic battle" to scour Egypt...
WORLD
October 7, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Eman Mostafa, a village girl from southern Egypt, was shot and killed last month when she dared to spit in the face of the man who groped her. Ramadan Salem told authorities he mistakenly shot Mostafa, 16, after she cursed him. It is uncertain whether Salem will be convicted: The only witness willing to testify - Mostafa's friend, Sahar Mamdouh - has been threatened in a society that often blames women and girls for provoking sexual crimes...
WORLD
August 30, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
SIDI BOUZID, Tunisia - Bearded and sweaty, they pressed in, their faces shining in the shadow and light beneath billowing tunics hanging for sale outside a mosque. The sun edged higher. A veiled woman hurried past and a boy stepped closer to listen to men complain about no jobs in fields or factories, no water in thousands of homes. "I didn't trust the old government and I don't trust the new one. They lie. I trust in another revolution," said Khalid Ahmedi, his disgust sharpening as shopkeepers slipped past him to pray.
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