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WORLD
September 12, 2012 | Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
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WORLD
September 12, 2012 | Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
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WORLD
September 11, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
WORLD
September 11, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dreary suburbs of Paris, they were Algerian immigrants who survived on part-time jobs and petty crime. In Milan, they were Tunisians who stole and forged passports. And on Spain's southeastern coast, they were Algerians who specialized in stealing credit cards. For these young Muslim men accused by police of plotting terror for Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda network, two obscure Islamic sects seemed to provide an arcane justification for underground lives of crime and terrorism.
WORLD
November 17, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Daragahi is a Times staff writer.
When it comes to strange Middle East bedfellows, Lebanon's latest political partnership may be the most unlikely: The leader of one party has a reputation as a playboy with ties to neoconservatives in the Bush administration. The other group is widely viewed as a community of extremists whose puritanical strain of Sunni Islam inspired Osama bin Laden.
WORLD
April 12, 2010 | By Haley Sweetland Edwards
Every woman at the bridal shower was drenched in color. One wore a lime green strapless gown with turquoise sequins; another a violet leopard-print caftan with scarlet lace; another a yellow, gold-beaded chemise with a neckline that would have made J-Lo blush. Was this Yemen, or a strange mirage? "Really, it is very bad," said Samira Taher, one of the women at the shower. "If you see me in Egypt, I am always wearing the latest fashion, I have my hair in a new design, and I am wearing makeup, but here, I am wrapped in black.
WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Zaid Ali and Laura King, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
SANA, Yemen -- In the latest in a spate of assassinations in Yemen, gunmen on Tuesday shot and killed a leading member of a Shiite Muslim group on his way to reconciliation talks and a senior advisor to a provincial governor was slain by a bomb planted in his car, security officials said. A third political figure, the son of the secretary-general of an Islamic party, survived an attempt on his life, officials said. The attacks came against a backdrop of unrest that has torn Yemen in the wake of the 2011 ouster of longtime President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who stepped down after popular protests erupted across the Arab world, including in Yemen.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - When he took the stage at a campaign stop last year, Nader Bakar moved with a polished grace that defied the brimstone stereotype of an ultraconservative Islamist. Lithe and bearded, Bakar was appearing at a rally supporting a progressive Islamist presidential candidate, even as his Nour party envisioned Egypt as an Islamic state. The candidate lost, but Nour, savvier than its bigger and more moderate rival, the Muslim Brotherhood, showed a political nimbleness rare among Egypt's religious movements.
OPINION
April 18, 2012 | By Rajan Menon
Like savvy boxers with knockout punches, Egypt's Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, or SCAF, and the Muslim Brotherhood have circled each other warily since the Arab Spring toppled President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011. But after the SCAF-appointed election commission's banning last week of 10 candidates for the May presidential elections, including the Brotherhood's nominee, Khairat Shater, the phase of circumspection may be ending. Egyptians could be in for rougher times. The SCAF abandoned Mubarak only after it realized that Egyptian protesters would not succumb to intimidation and force.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dreary suburbs of Paris, they were Algerian immigrants who survived on part-time jobs and petty crime. In Milan, they were Tunisians who stole and forged passports. And on Spain's southeastern coast, they were Algerians who specialized in stealing credit cards. For these young Muslim men accused by police of plotting terror for Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda network, two obscure Islamic sects seemed to provide an arcane justification for underground lives of crime and terrorism.
WORLD
August 10, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
CAIRO - When Hosni Mubarak ruled Egypt, Ahmed Helal was locked up four times in Tora prison, officials' favorite detention facility for perceived enemies of the state. Each time, he was arrested in the middle of the night and thrown in with scores of others whose only offense, they believed, was being Shiite Muslims. But Egypt's Shiite community - a small, reticent minority in a country dominated by Sunni Muslims - would come to view Mubarak's three-decade reign almost as the good old days.
WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - As night fell Saturday and cars swerved around Tahrir Square tooting their horns, a stout woman in a black veil and robes screamed herself hoarse: "The president is an agent of the Americans!" But the protesters who had tried to charge the U.S. Embassy during four days of violent demonstrations had already gone, driven out by the police that morning. Pedestrians covered their mouths and winced when they passed the spots where the police had sprayed hundreds of canisters of tear gas. Even as Cairo settled back into its normal rhythms, and capitals around the Arab world did the same, the protests over an anti-Muslim video produced in California delivered the same jarring message of uncertainty to ordinary citizens from Tunis to Cairo: They were prisoners of a political transition whose happy ending was far from assured.
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