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Salam Al Marayati

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Thursday, he held a news conference in Los Angeles with a prominent local Muslim leader to praise NATO bombing attacks in defense of Muslim-sheltering "safe zones" in Bosnia. In Dallas six days earlier, he announced a national campaign to support a Muslim couple who lost their two young children to state-ordered adoption, and were subsequently baptized as Christians by the foster parents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
Highlighting its 25 th anniversary, the Los Angeles-based Muslim Public Affairs Council on Friday issued what it called a Declaration Against Extremism, an effort to change public perception by distilling the values of mainstream Islam. “We have allowed the extremist voices to run rampant without effectively conveying our message,” said Salam Al-Marayati, president of the council, among the nation's most influential advocacy organizations for American Muslims. “What this declaration represents is a higher level of conveying the message of Islam, the true spirit of Islam, which is based on spreading mercy, justice and engaging others in a pluralistic society.” Among other principles, the council's statement calls for respecting all cultures, equal treatment of women, and upholding the idea that authority comes from God rather than from individual leaders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
House Democratic leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) has withdrawn the nomination of Salam Al-Marayati, a prominent Los Angeles Muslim leader, to a congressional commission on terrorism, bowing to criticism from some Jewish organizations. Aides to Gephardt informed Al-Marayati of the decision Thursday, saying they had belatedly discovered that federal officials would not be able to process a security clearance in time for him to join the commission's work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
We will know soon enough who unleashed Monday's grotesque violence on Boston. But it is fair to say that many Muslims who heard that explosions had marred the end of the Boston Marathon had a simple, poignant thought: Please don't let it be a Muslim. “Was this thought crossing your mind today?” asked the Facebook page of the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles, which featured this Washington Post blog post on the subject .  “Seems like it was for many Muslims.” For Muslims who lived through the hysteria that followed the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995, and the ugliness of the backlash against Muslims after the 9/11 attacks, such a response is understandable.
OPINION
May 22, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Salam Al-Marayati began working at the Muslim Public Affairs Council more than 20 years ago, and his is a job that only seems to get more demanding Al-Marayati was 3 when his family moved to the United States from Iraq; as the president of the L.A.-based national group, he's become a cultural translator and a kind of human shield between misperceptions of the Muslim faith and several million believers living here. Invoking the Koran (he's holding one in the picture) and the Constitution, he plays offense and defense, making himself available for reporters, politicians and law enforcement, and blogging on matters like the Ft. Hood massacre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1999
Your July 12 editorial about the nomination of Salam Al-Marayati to the U.S. government National Commission on Terrorism asserted that his opponents found only "a few sentences [by Al-Marayati] that some might infer to be insufficiently condemnatory" of terrorism. We opposed Al-Marayati because of his many statements justifying terrorism against Israel and America and taking other extremist positions. Al-Marayati responded to a March 1997 Hamas suicide bombing, in which three Israeli women were murdered, by saying Israel's prime minister "bears the brunt of responsibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a show of solidarity with Muslims, moderate Jewish and Christian leaders on Friday decried an about-face by House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt in withdrawing his controversial appointment of a Los Angeles Muslim to the National Commission on Terrorism. Their reaction came a day after Gephardt stunned Muslim leaders across the country by announcing that he was rescinding his appointment of Salam Al-Marayati, executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1990
I commend your Opinion section (Dec.31). It was quite enlightening to read the religious views of this era from the Catholic, Jewish and Protestant perspectives. I would lilke to request, however, that you entertain the thought of incorporating an Isamic opinion in the future, especially since Islam is the fastest growing religion in the United States, and Muslims will become the second largest religious group in America by the year 2000. SALAM AL-MARAYATI Director, Muslim Public Affairs Council Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The manager of Rep. Jim Rogan's reelection campaign attacked Democratic challenger Adam Schiff on Tuesday for attending a forum with a Los Angeles Muslim community leader, saying it "raised some questions about the associations he plans to keep" if elected to Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The leader of an Armenian-American organization on Thursday joined a group of rabbis and Episcopal clerics who criticized the reelection campaign of Rep. James E. Rogan (R-Glendale) for questioning whether a prominent Los Angeles Muslim harbored "pro-terrorist sympathies." At the same time, Rogan was applauded by the Zionist Organization of America for raising questions about Salam Al-Marayati, the executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim and Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
The reactions reflected unalloyed joy and deliverance: It was "double good news," a "victorious day," the dawn of "a new era. " These were the voices of Muslim American leaders and scholars, for whom the news of Osama bin Laden's death came bundled with an extra ribbon of relief. "American Muslims have kind of been in a kettle, a boiling kettle, and the fire has been this terrorism," said Ihsan Bagby, an associate professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Kentucky. "Hopefully, the demise of Qaeda and this terrorist philosophy will put out the fire.
OPINION
May 22, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Salam Al-Marayati began working at the Muslim Public Affairs Council more than 20 years ago, and his is a job that only seems to get more demanding Al-Marayati was 3 when his family moved to the United States from Iraq; as the president of the L.A.-based national group, he's become a cultural translator and a kind of human shield between misperceptions of the Muslim faith and several million believers living here. Invoking the Koran (he's holding one in the picture) and the Constitution, he plays offense and defense, making himself available for reporters, politicians and law enforcement, and blogging on matters like the Ft. Hood massacre.
OPINION
December 15, 2004
Re "Guilty of 'Flying While Muslim'?" in Voices, Dec. 11: I was disturbed to read of what happened to Salam Al-Marayati and his family at LAX. I know Salam and his wife; they are each a shining star and a loud voice of moderation among the American Muslim community. I hope that this incident will not slow down Salam in his work and struggle for human rights and that he will continue in building bridges of understanding and harmony between the different communities and his dialogue with the leaders of this nation.
OPINION
December 15, 2002
Re "Anti-Islam Rhetoric Undercuts Moderates," Commentary, Dec. 11: Having traveled to Egypt and Turkey, I know that believing in the Islamic faith does not mean that one is vicious or violent. But such everyday peaceful lives are sadly overshadowed by events like the senseless violence in Nigeria over the Miss World pageant. Until there is a vocal condemnation across the Islamic world of the fringe minority who are filled with ignorance and hate -- of those in the Islamic world who take out of context the words of the Koran -- there will be a justification of those on the other side who deride Islam.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The leader of an Armenian-American organization on Thursday joined a group of rabbis and Episcopal clerics who criticized the reelection campaign of Rep. James E. Rogan (R-Glendale) for questioning whether a prominent Los Angeles Muslim harbored "pro-terrorist sympathies." At the same time, Rogan was applauded by the Zionist Organization of America for raising questions about Salam Al-Marayati, the executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council. Al-Marayati, who said he unequivocally opposes terrorism, appeared Thursday with an interfaith group of supporters at All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The leader of an Armenian-American organization on Thursday joined a group of rabbis and Episcopal clerics who criticized the reelection campaign of Rep. James E. Rogan (R-Glendale) for questioning whether a prominent Los Angeles Muslim harbored "pro-terrorist sympathies." At the same time, Rogan was applauded by the Zionist Organization of America for raising questions about Salam Al-Marayati, the executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996
Jack Saltzberg's letter, "Movies and Stereotypes," in the Jan. 29 Calendar carried erroneous information regarding international terrorism. As a former Israeli operative, Saltzberg believes that Muslims and Arabs should be classified as the major terrorist threat, but the record according to the U.S. Department of State proves otherwise. In its annual report on global terrorism, the Office of Counterterrorism indicated that Latin America and Europe accounted for the greatest number of international terrorist incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key supporter of Rep. Jim Rogan (R-Glendale) on Wednesday sharply criticized the manager of his reelection campaign for saying a Los Angeles Muslim community leader "seems to be an apologist for Muslim terrorists." Irshad Ul-Haque, who has raised campaign money for Rogan, said it was "mind-boggling" that the congressman's campaign manager, Jason Roe, made the remark about Salam Al-Marayati, the executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The manager of Rep. Jim Rogan's reelection campaign attacked Democratic challenger Adam Schiff on Tuesday for attending a forum with a Los Angeles Muslim community leader, saying it "raised some questions about the associations he plans to keep" if elected to Congress.
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