Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSalam Fayyad
IN THE NEWS

Salam Fayyad

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
August 31, 2010 | Ali Abunimah
Rabbi Kenneth Chasen is the latest to offer a glowing report of the Palestinian-state-in-the-making supposedly being built by Salam Fayyad, a political unknown until he was boosted from obscurity by the George W. Bush administration and installed as the unelected "prime minister" of the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah. But the booming businesses and sleek glass towers Chasen raves about in Ramallah are part of a mirage, a narrative in which a docile Palestinian leadership "reforms" Palestine from within, making little or no noise about the ongoing depredations of Israeli occupation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
May 16, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In the 65 years since the creation of  Israel and the scattering of millions of Palestinians from their historic homeland, hope of resolving the core crisis of the Middle East has risen to joyous pinnacles like Camp David and crashed into despair with deadly outbreaks of violence and bloodshed. When Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad in 2009 launched a two-year program to build up the economy and institutions of democratic rule, his vow to show the world that Palestine was ready for statehood inspired filmmakers Dan Setton of Jerusalem and Elise Pearlstein of Los Angeles to document his mission.
Advertisement
WORLD
May 16, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In the 65 years since the creation of  Israel and the scattering of millions of Palestinians from their historic homeland, hope of resolving the core crisis of the Middle East has risen to joyous pinnacles like Camp David and crashed into despair with deadly outbreaks of violence and bloodshed. When Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad in 2009 launched a two-year program to build up the economy and institutions of democratic rule, his vow to show the world that Palestine was ready for statehood inspired filmmakers Dan Setton of Jerusalem and Elise Pearlstein of Los Angeles to document his mission.
OPINION
April 18, 2013 | By Aaron David Miller
The looming resignation of Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad, announced last week, may be very bad news for the prospects of good governance in Palestine. But it has the potential to inject clarity and honesty into the problems of the much-too-promised land. Fayyad's departure may help to dispel four dangerous myths that continue to distort the way different constituencies view the issues that divide the region. It's time we lay them to rest. They are: The myth of Palestinian unity Now that Fayyad is leaving, the way should be clearer for serious discussions between Hamas and Fatah about achieving reconciliation and unity.
WORLD
March 8, 2009 | Maher Abukhater and Richard Boudreaux
Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad, a U.S.-trained economist who gained international respect and hefty aid donations for the Palestinian cause, said Saturday that he would step down in a move aimed at reviving a power-sharing deal with the militant group Hamas. The shake-up is part of evolving leadership changes on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that could complicate the Obama administration's search for peace in the region.
OPINION
January 25, 2011
A peacemaker? Re "Palestinian leader an enigma to all," Jan. 21 As Israeli President Shimon Peres said, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad might be ? referring to Israel's founding father ? his people's "first Ben-Gurionist. " Just as President Obama received a Nobel Peace Prize to stimulate future accomplishments, the Norwegian Nobel Committee should consider doing the same for Fayyad and other key peacemakers. That was tried before, and the time is right to try it again.
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad acknowledged that significant obstacles lay ahead on the road to statehood, but insisted his government will be ready by this summer. Fayyad spoke to the Los Angeles Times about what work still needs to be done, whether he'd like to be Palestinian Authority president one day and why he continues to "confound" Israelis. With U.S. peace talks collapsed, is it time for Palestinians to shift strategies? Should your state-building program, targeted for completion in August, become the primary focus?
OPINION
April 18, 2013 | By Aaron David Miller
The looming resignation of Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad, announced last week, may be very bad news for the prospects of good governance in Palestine. But it has the potential to inject clarity and honesty into the problems of the much-too-promised land. Fayyad's departure may help to dispel four dangerous myths that continue to distort the way different constituencies view the issues that divide the region. It's time we lay them to rest. They are: The myth of Palestinian unity Now that Fayyad is leaving, the way should be clearer for serious discussions between Hamas and Fatah about achieving reconciliation and unity.
WORLD
October 11, 2003 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
He's an improbable hero, stomping through town in a cloud of cigarette smoke, sleeping little and talking much. But this short, frenetic paper pusher has done what only a few fringe optimists thought possible: wrestled some accountability into a snarled Palestinian government and delivered tangible reform.
WORLD
February 15, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
In a second shakeup in three days, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad said Monday that he would disband his Cabinet and form a new one within three weeks. The announcement came as a surprise because the Palestine Liberation Organization, which created the authority, announced Saturday that it would hold long-delayed presidential and legislative elections by September, potentially replacing the government. Palestinian officials presented the Cabinet reshuffling as a move to address growing calls for democratic reform, which elsewhere in the Arab world have led to leaders being ousted in Egypt and Tunisia.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By Maher Abukhater, Los Angeles Times
Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad said Monday he wants to include leaders of the rival Hamas movement in his next government as part of an effort to end the nearly 4-year-old fracture in Palestinian leadership. Though details have not been worked out and Fayyad does not appear to have formally unveiled the initiative to Hamas officials in the Gaza Strip, the prime minister said his plan would permit Hamas to retain security control of the seaside enclave while receiving certain posts in a reformed Cabinet.
WORLD
February 15, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
In a second shakeup in three days, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad said Monday that he would disband his Cabinet and form a new one within three weeks. The announcement came as a surprise because the Palestine Liberation Organization, which created the authority, announced Saturday that it would hold long-delayed presidential and legislative elections by September, potentially replacing the government. Palestinian officials presented the Cabinet reshuffling as a move to address growing calls for democratic reform, which elsewhere in the Arab world have led to leaders being ousted in Egypt and Tunisia.
OPINION
January 25, 2011
A peacemaker? Re "Palestinian leader an enigma to all," Jan. 21 As Israeli President Shimon Peres said, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad might be ? referring to Israel's founding father ? his people's "first Ben-Gurionist. " Just as President Obama received a Nobel Peace Prize to stimulate future accomplishments, the Norwegian Nobel Committee should consider doing the same for Fayyad and other key peacemakers. That was tried before, and the time is right to try it again.
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad acknowledged that significant obstacles lay ahead on the road to statehood, but insisted his government will be ready by this summer. Fayyad spoke to the Los Angeles Times about what work still needs to be done, whether he'd like to be Palestinian Authority president one day and why he continues to "confound" Israelis. With U.S. peace talks collapsed, is it time for Palestinians to shift strategies? Should your state-building program, targeted for completion in August, become the primary focus?
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
No one seems to know what to make of him. Israelis puzzle over the cleanshaven technocrat who denounces violence. Palestinians see an outsider who never cut his teeth on the tear-gas-choked streets of intifadas. Now, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad hopes to confound expectations even further, pursuing what some see as a quixotic goal of laying the groundwork for an independent country by August. No matter that peace talks are stalled. If Palestinians build the trappings of a state, he believes, a real state will follow.
OPINION
August 31, 2010 | Ali Abunimah
Rabbi Kenneth Chasen is the latest to offer a glowing report of the Palestinian-state-in-the-making supposedly being built by Salam Fayyad, a political unknown until he was boosted from obscurity by the George W. Bush administration and installed as the unelected "prime minister" of the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah. But the booming businesses and sleek glass towers Chasen raves about in Ramallah are part of a mirage, a narrative in which a docile Palestinian leadership "reforms" Palestine from within, making little or no noise about the ongoing depredations of Israeli occupation.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By Maher Abukhater, Los Angeles Times
Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad said Monday he wants to include leaders of the rival Hamas movement in his next government as part of an effort to end the nearly 4-year-old fracture in Palestinian leadership. Though details have not been worked out and Fayyad does not appear to have formally unveiled the initiative to Hamas officials in the Gaza Strip, the prime minister said his plan would permit Hamas to retain security control of the seaside enclave while receiving certain posts in a reformed Cabinet.
WORLD
January 21, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
No one seems to know what to make of him. Israelis puzzle over the cleanshaven technocrat who denounces violence. Palestinians see an outsider who never cut his teeth on the tear-gas-choked streets of intifadas. Now, Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad hopes to confound expectations even further, pursuing what some see as a quixotic goal of laying the groundwork for an independent country by August. No matter that peace talks are stalled. If Palestinians build the trappings of a state, he believes, a real state will follow.
OPINION
August 25, 2010 | By Rabbi Kenneth Chasen
The short drive from Jerusalem to Ramallah begins as you'd expect. The pristine setting of the old-new holy city slowly morphs into a more disordered vista on the outskirts of town — small Arab villages, humbly built of stone, displaying signs of economic decay. The streets are nearly empty. Startlingly soon, the Israeli military checkpoint appears at a break in the expanse of the cement separation barrier. Immediately upon crossing, the most frequently photographed stretch of the barrier comes into sight, a lengthy and colorful mural that includes massive painted images of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat as a young man and of Marwan Barghouti, who's in an Israeli prison for his role in the second intifada.
OPINION
September 10, 2009 | Daoud Kuttab, Daoud Kuttab, a Palestinian columnist, commutes between Amman, Jordan, and Ramallah, West Bank. E-mail:
Something different is happening among the Palestinians. Their political leaders and civil servants are spending more time planning for a Palestinian state than criticizing the Israelis for their intransigence. During the first congress of the leading Palestinian movement, Fatah, in 20 years, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas refused to be dragged into belligerent rhetoric. He insisted that although Palestinians have the right to use all forms of resistance, he chooses diplomacy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|