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Salama Khafaji

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November 2, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Salama Khafaji did not make a powerful first impression. When I met her, she had just been appointed to the U.S.-backed Iraqi Governing Council as the replacement for a female official who had been assassinated, and she barely spoke during our interview. She wore, as she always does, the traditional head abaya favored by religious Shiite women in Iraq, a flowing black robe that covers everything but the face.
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WORLD
November 2, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Salama Khafaji did not make a powerful first impression. When I met her, she had just been appointed to the U.S.-backed Iraqi Governing Council as the replacement for a female official who had been assassinated, and she barely spoke during our interview. She wore, as she always does, the traditional head abaya favored by religious Shiite women in Iraq, a flowing black robe that covers everything but the face.
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WORLD
December 1, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Gunmen shot to death nine Shiite Muslim laborers Wednesday near the city of Baqubah, the latest attack in an ongoing campaign of violence against Shiites by Sunni insurgents rebelling against the U.S.-backed government. In the capital, snipers fired on the home of Salama Khafaji, a prominent Shiite politician, wounding two guards.
WORLD
May 9, 2004 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Fighting filled the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Saturday after black-clad militia members loyal to an anti-American cleric stormed through the streets skirmishing with British troops. There were also deadly clashes in the southern city of Amarah and in Karbala, where U.S. tanks entered from two directions, blocking roads leading to the city center. The turbulence in the south was an indicator of the depth of discontent with the U.S.
WORLD
August 1, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
With an Aug. 15 deadline looming, several members of the committee writing Iraq's new constitution predicted Sunday that the panel would be unable to iron out major differences by mid-month and would instead request an extension. "The direction is toward postponement," said committee member Younadam Kanna, adding that a final decision would be made today, the cutoff date for seeking a delay.
WORLD
May 7, 2004 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
It will take more than a presidential condemnation to restore America's tattered credibility over the prisoner abuse scandal at the Abu Ghraib detention facility. That appears to be the consensus here judging from Iraqis' reaction Thursday to President Bush's interviews on Arabic television that branded the torture of Iraqi prisoners "abominable." Bush was responding to accusations, documented in photographs, that some U.S. soldiers working in the prison abused detainees.
WORLD
February 29, 2004 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
The Iraqi Governing Council, deeply divided over the role of religion in a future government and other core issues, worked late into the night Saturday but failed to meet its deadline to approve an interim constitution. Some council members voiced strong optimism that differences could be overcome, but others said the group remained deeply split on key issues. "We started to learn a new trade, and it's called compromise," said Mouwafak Rabii, an independent Shiite Muslim member of the council.
WORLD
May 28, 2004 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
U.S. officials embraced a peace plan here Thursday offered by fundamentalist cleric Muqtada Sadr, raising hopes for an end to weeks of fighting between his militia and American troops that has left several hundred dead and damaged Islamic shrines. Sadr, whose Al Mahdi militia seized control of key parts of Najaf last month, unveiled a four-point proposal brokered by moderate Shiite leaders that calls for him to relinquish control of government buildings and send some of his armed followers home.
WORLD
April 9, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Inside the ancient Bratha Mosque, the white-turbaned cleric called on the Shiite throng to recall their suffering at the hands of Sunni Arab insurgents: the February bombing of the holy shrine of Samarra; how it collapsed the golden dome and desecrated the graves of their ancestors. Sheik Jalaluddin Saghir exhorted Shiites to visit the ruined holy site out of defiance, if not faith.
WORLD
June 12, 2004 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Saamir Abid Majid knew it was risky to open a little stand selling Pepsi and candy to troops at a U.S. base outside Fallouja. After an Iraqi barber who also worked at the military base was shot while driving home, Majid started carrying a 9-millimeter pistol in his vehicle. But when the van was ambushed on the highway in March, Majid had no time to react before a barrage of rifle fire hit him from both sides. His passenger, an Iraqi interpreter who also worked at the U.S. base, died instantly.
WORLD
April 10, 2004 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Tough U.S. tactics in Fallouja and Shiite Muslim cities of southern Iraq are driving a wedge between the Americans and their key supporter -- the 25-member Governing Council that puts an Iraqi face on the occupation and is expected to serve as the basis of a new government. One council member, angered by this week's heavy fighting in Fallouja and the prospect of a U.S. move against the militia of an anti-American Shiite cleric, suspended his membership Friday.
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