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August 23, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small town in the scenic Allegheny Mountains was settled by whites in the early 1800s and is like no other place in the nation. It is the only U.S. municipality that lies almost entirely within the confines of a recognized Indian reserve: the Seneca Nation's 30,469-acre Allegany Reservation. For most of the history of this community, whose present-day population is about 6,600, this unique arrangement presented few problems.
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NEWS
August 23, 1992 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small town in the scenic Allegheny Mountains was settled by whites in the early 1800s and is like no other place in the nation. It is the only U.S. municipality that lies almost entirely within the confines of a recognized Indian reserve: the Seneca Nation's 30,469-acre Allegany Reservation. For most of the history of this community, whose present-day population is about 6,600, this unique arrangement presented few problems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Paul Owens, 79, a former general manager of baseball's Philadelphia Phillies, died Friday at Underwood Hospital in Woodbury, N.J., after a long illness. During his 48-year career with the team, Owens served as general manager when the team won National League Eastern Division titles in 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1980. The 1980 team won the World Series, besting Kansas City in six games. Owens was also the field manager of the Phillies team that won the National League pennant in 1983.
HOME & GARDEN
February 3, 2001 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Toys of any kind are popular collectibles, and among the most popular are automobiles. Toy makers realized that children liked to play with copies of adult items, and toy cars were made almost as soon as full-size cars were. The iron or lithographed tin toy cars of the very early 1900s sell today for thousands of dollars. Some are exact replicas; some are "fantasy" cars that do not copy real cars. The most desirable have passengers, usually made of iron.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1985 | JACK HAWN
Back in the mid-'40s, when life was less complicated and traffic less congested, songwriter Jay Livingston was cruising down Hollywood Boulevard with his best girl, humming one of his and partner Ray Evans' new tunes. Livingston was troubled. After two weeks, the melody still wasn't right. Continuing to hum, he ignored his date, concentrating instead on variations of the tune. Suddenly, it all worked. "I pulled over and parked the car," he said. "I had to write it down real fast."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Livingston, who with songwriting partner Ray Evans wrote some of America's most popular songs and shared Academy Awards for "Buttons and Bows," "Mona Lisa" and "Que Sera, Sera," has died. He was 86. Livingston died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of pneumonia, said publicist Frank Liberman. In a collaboration that began in the late 1930s, Livingston--who provided the melodies--and the surviving Evans--who wrote the lyrics--wrote 26 songs that sold more than a million records each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Ray Evans, whose long collaboration with songwriting partner Jay Livingston produced a string of hits that included the Oscar-winning "Buttons and Bows," "Mona Lisa" and "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)," has died. He was 92. Evans, who teamed with Livingston in the late 1930s, died Thursday evening at UCLA Medical Center of an apparent heart attack, Frederick Nicholas, Evans' lawyer and the trustee of his estate, said Friday.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2002 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
For years the Niagara Falls Convention Center was a squat eyesore in the middle of town, a symbol of steady economic decline in a resort city that once billed itself as the honeymoon capital of the world. But on New Year's Eve, the old arena with a leaky roof will be transformed into a glittering, Las Vegas-style casino, the largest Indian-run gambling emporium to open in a U.S. city.
TRAVEL
August 21, 1994 | JAMES T. YENCKEL J.T.Y...BD: WASHINGTON POST
A crimson sun, barely topping the forested ridges of the Allegheny Mountains of northwestern Pennsylvania, slipped slowly into twilight, and the only sound was a breeze teasing the branches of the trees. In the waning light, a small crowd of spectators stood on a steep hillside hoping to catch a glimpse of the herd of wild elk that inhabit this remote corner of the state. With the luck that frequently rewards persevering sightseers, they weren't disappointed.
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