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Salambek Khadzhiyev

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NEWS
June 20, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard not to feel a little sorry for Salambek Khadzhiyev. The chemical engineer-cum-politician installed by Moscow to rule its rebellious republic of Chechnya has little power and lots of enemies. Khadzhiyev is prime minister of Chechnya's so-called Government of National Revival but has no means of his own to revive anything. Russia supplies his entire budget, and it's not nearly enough to rebuild this capital, which has been ruined by war.
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NEWS
June 20, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard not to feel a little sorry for Salambek Khadzhiyev. The chemical engineer-cum-politician installed by Moscow to rule its rebellious republic of Chechnya has little power and lots of enemies. Khadzhiyev is prime minister of Chechnya's so-called Government of National Revival but has no means of his own to revive anything. Russia supplies his entire budget, and it's not nearly enough to rebuild this capital, which has been ruined by war.
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NEWS
October 24, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of the Kremlin-installed Government of National Revival in rebel Chechnya, a critic of recent artillery attacks by Russian troops, said he has resigned. Salambek Khadzhiyev, 55, said Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin had offered him a senior job in the Russian government. He suggested that his post should be given to another prominent Chechen political figure, Doku Zavgayev.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battle-weary politicians bought time for reflecting on another looming power struggle in Russia by agreeing Friday to extend a cease-fire in the war in Chechnya and postponing a parliamentary confrontation with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the rows of banners unfurled by Chechen demonstrators each day at the site of Russian-Chechen peace talks, one of the most striking is a heroic portrait of guerrilla commander Shamil Basayev. "Imam Shamil II," it reads. "He who laughs last laughs best." There is nothing funny about this message. Basayev led the latest attack in the 6-month-old Chechen war--a siege of the Russian city of Budennovsk in which more than 1,000 civilians were held hostage for days and more than 100 people died.
NEWS
July 4, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since it declared war on his breakaway republic and put out a warrant for his arrest, the Russian government Monday sent a peace envoy to meet Chechen President Dzhokar M. Dudayev as both sides struggled for a way to end six months of fighting. The midnight-to-4 a.m. meeting at Dudayev's mountain hide-out was inconclusive and left peace talks in Grozny, the Chechen capital, deadlocked over the tiny republic's political status. The talks were adjourned until Thursday.
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