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FOOD
February 26, 2003
I really enjoyed your article on California salami ("The Taste of Victory," Feb. 19). It reminded of the days when I worked in my uncle's grocery store meat department in Santa Rosa. We had a full-service deli department that stocked all sorts of Columbus, Molinari and Gallo salami and other deli meats. We would order Columbus salami in 3-foot-long chubs that were thick and damp when delivered. We would hang them up and let them dry out a bit (at least a week). Letting them hang for a while definitely improved the texture and intensity of the flavor.
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FOOD
August 10, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
No matter the occasion, my friend Rafael inevitably shows up with a platter of prosciutto di San Daniele, the sweeter cousin of Parma ham, that he's purchased at Roma Deli in Pasadena. It's always perfectly sliced, the way they do it in Italy, so thin the ham almost melts on the tongue and you can taste every bit of its salty-sweet goodness. That's an example of sumptuous minimalism in a charcuterie or salumi plate. And it used to be about the only option if you wanted to put together one at home.
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FOOD
December 22, 1985 | ROSE DOSTI
Looking for comic relief between heavy-duty cookbook reading? Try King's book. And I really don't think King needed Sheraton for this funny book on cooking with recipes, although her comments (written as dialogue to King's), recipe writing and prestigious reputation certainly can't hurt. What does hurt are comparisons. You can't help but find Sheraton's writing ponderous compared to King's flippant, talky style, and certainly not as funny--almost an unnecessary interruption.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
The USDA decision late last week to allow imports of more Italian cured meats already has food lovers salivating. Ask them for particulars and they will reply almost in unison: “ Culatello. ” “I'm looking forward to everything, but the main one would be culatello ,” says Marco Guidi, whose family has run the Italian specialty food distributor Guidi Marcello in Santa Monica for more than 30 years. Almost unknown in this country, culatello is the “heart” of a prosciutto ham, removed and cured separately. It has a silky texture and profound pork flavor.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Jonathan Gold
Are weeks gray without a sliver of Tuscan lardo? Do you crave coppa made from Cinta Senese pigs? Have you ever considered attaching a gold chain to a whole prosciutto in an attempt to persuade a customs inspector that it was a kicky Fendi bag? You may be in luck. According to the Italian wire service ANSA, the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services announced Friday that the long-standing USDA ban on the import of Italian cured meats will be lifted starting May 28, and presumably the flood of salami, bresaola and pancetta will start washing into U.S. markets and restaurants not long thereafter.
MAGAZINE
December 17, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
BLAME IT ON THE DELI craze, but a surprising new appetizer is starting to turn up in all the chic restaurants. You'll find it, for example, at Spago, where slices are served reverently, as if it were the most delicate of dishes. In Italian restaurants, you sometimes find it sitting right next to the priceless prosciutto that has started coming back into the country now that the government has lifted its ban.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
The USDA decision late last week to allow imports of more Italian cured meats already has food lovers salivating. Ask them for particulars and they will reply almost in unison: “ Culatello. ” “I'm looking forward to everything, but the main one would be culatello ,” says Marco Guidi, whose family has run the Italian specialty food distributor Guidi Marcello in Santa Monica for more than 30 years. Almost unknown in this country, culatello is the “heart” of a prosciutto ham, removed and cured separately. It has a silky texture and profound pork flavor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1990
The present Supreme Court should go down in history as "the salami court." It has taken several slices off civil rights. Now, in the CNN case, it's freedom of the press. What's next? FREDERIC E. PAMP Santa Ynez
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | From Times wire services
Health authorities today said 30,000 pigs have been destroyed because of a swine fever epidemic in Modena province, renowned for its salami and hams. It has caused losses estimated at $12 million, said the health office of this northern province where farmers breed nearly 1.3 million pigs a year. Bodies of the dead pigs were burned and officials ordered a massive vaccination program, the office said.
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | United Press International
Salami made by a Pennsylvania meat firm is being recalled in California and 18 other states after routine testing detected salmonella, an Agriculture Department official says. The voluntary recall by Citterio U.S.A. of Freeland, Pa., involves its 12-ounce to 14-ounce size of "Sopressata Campagna" with the code 06 14 88, Lester Crawford, administrator of the department's Food and Safety Inspection Service, said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Jonathan Gold
Are weeks gray without a sliver of Tuscan lardo? Do you crave coppa made from Cinta Senese pigs? Have you ever considered attaching a gold chain to a whole prosciutto in an attempt to persuade a customs inspector that it was a kicky Fendi bag? You may be in luck. According to the Italian wire service ANSA, the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services announced Friday that the long-standing USDA ban on the import of Italian cured meats will be lifted starting May 28, and presumably the flood of salami, bresaola and pancetta will start washing into U.S. markets and restaurants not long thereafter.
BOOKS
February 29, 2004 | Rebecca Pawel, Rebecca Pawel is the author of "Death of a Nationalist" and "Law of Return," two novels set in Spain immediately after the civil war.
It is difficult to give "Soldiers of Salamis" by Javier Cercas the serious attention it deserves without making the novel sound ponderous and unappealing. This is a shame. The book is funny and gripping and also a tear-jerker in the best sense of the word. I laughed and cried while reading it, even though I didn't quite fall in love. The key to the novel's charm (and it is charming) is that it works on so many levels.
FOOD
February 26, 2003
I really enjoyed your article on California salami ("The Taste of Victory," Feb. 19). It reminded of the days when I worked in my uncle's grocery store meat department in Santa Rosa. We had a full-service deli department that stocked all sorts of Columbus, Molinari and Gallo salami and other deli meats. We would order Columbus salami in 3-foot-long chubs that were thick and damp when delivered. We would hang them up and let them dry out a bit (at least a week). Letting them hang for a while definitely improved the texture and intensity of the flavor.
FOOD
February 19, 2003 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
THERE are official luxuries, like foie gras, then there is salami. Who hasn't stood in line at a deli and watched a gnarly chub with a moldy, white skin being placed on the slicing machine? As the slices tumble onto the open face of an awaiting baguette, silence falls and nostrils flare as an almost wine-like aroma rises from the meat. Salami does just as well in elegant settings, say on a charcuterie plate spread with ham and pate. You reach for the salami first.
TRAVEL
October 14, 2001 | JERRY HAINES, Jerry Haines is a lawyer in Washington, D.C
Out there somewhere, I suspect, is a rule book for Pittsburgh diner waitresses. In it, one could find the precise procedure for taking an order: 1. With left hand, retrieve order pad from apron pocket. 2. With right hand, take pencil from behind ear. 3. Touch pencil point against tongue; prepare to write on pad. 4. Say, "Yinz ready, hon?" Variations are permissible, but Step 4 is mandatory. All customers are to be greeted as "hon."
NEWS
May 28, 2001 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pizza Hut now delivers to outer space. Boldly going where no restaurant chain has gone before, the company recently sent a small, vacuum-packed salami pizza into orbit aboard a Russian rocket. No, the rocket didn't have one of those lighted Pizza Hut signs on the roof. It was a cargo ship ferrying supplies to the International Space Station. Once the craft docked, cosmonaut Yuri Usachov unpacked the 6-inch disc, heated it in a tiny silver oven and took a bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | KATHIE JENKINS
"Salami policing is difficult," admits Bob Snow, chief sanitarian with the Los Angeles County Health Department. But when Marvin Saul, owner of Junior's Deli, complained that the health department was not enforcing the regulations fairly, he responded. "They came in here," says Saul's son David, "and said we couldn't hang our salamis over the counter because the salamis must be refrigerated. But every other deli in town is hanging salamis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | STEVE CHAWKINS
Walk into the Corti Sisters Italian Deli for a salami and stagger out with a family saga. The sisters--Chris Corti, 49, and Jodeen Frank, 48--like to laugh and love to talk. Sometimes they finish each other's sentences. Each wears a name tag that identifies herself as "the other sister." They live together, they work the 14-hour days demanded by a new business, they moan about the pinched little rules that govern sinks and grease traps.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About two months ago, I reviewed Maggiano's Little Italy, a splashy South Coast Plaza restaurant that specializes in home-style Italian dishes and huge portions. I also raved about the Corner Bakery, which occupies about a third of the same building. The Corner Bakery has quickly established itself as one of O.C.'s premier Italian bakeries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | STEVE CHAWKINS
Walk into the Corti Sisters Italian Deli for a salami and stagger out with a family saga. The sisters--Chris Corti, 49, and Jodeen Frank, 48--like to laugh and love to talk. Sometimes they finish each other's sentences. Each wears a name tag that identifies herself as "the other sister." They live together, they work the 14-hour days demanded by a new business, they moan about the pinched little rules that govern sinks and grease traps.
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