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March 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The head of the NBA Players Assn. said Wednesday that the union might attempt to abandon the salary cap when the collective bargaining agreement expires after the 1993-94 season. Charles Grantham, the union's executive director, said that the players agreed to the salary cap when the NBA was in financial difficulty, and that the players might not agree to extend the concept. "I'm not so sure the salary cap is the answer to our problems," Grantham said during a sports business forum.
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February 20, 2014 | By Ben Bolch and Broderick Turner
The Clippers made a pair of minor trades shortly before Thursday's deadline, dealing veteran forward Antawn Jamison to the Atlanta Hawks and reserve center Byron Mullens to the Philadelphia 76ers in moves that brought them closer to the luxury tax threshold while opening a pair of roster spots. They traded Jamison and an undisclosed sum of cash to Atlanta for the rights to Cenk Akyol, a 6-foot-7 forward who was the Hawks' second-round draft pick in 2005 but has never appeared in the NBA and now plays in Turkey.
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May 11, 1995 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major league baseball owners discussed reinstating the salary cap as their main labor thrust but failed to reach a conclusion during a six-hour meeting Wednesday at Itasca, Ill. They also refrained from setting a date for the resumption of bargaining talks with the players' union.
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November 22, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Happy birthday, butt fumble! Hard to believe, but it's already been a year since the most notorious play in Mark Sanchez's up-and-down tenure as the New York Jets starting quarterback took place. In that short amount of time, the phrase has become a part of our national consciousness. Just type the word "butt" into Google. What's the first thing that comes up? "Butt fumble" -- ahead of "butterfly effect," "butternut squash soup" (a tough one to beat this time of year), "butt workouts" and even "butt implants.
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December 18, 1994 | MARK MASKE, WASHINGTON POST
Baseball's team owners were told by at least one attorney during their meeting in Chicago Thursday that their planned implementation of a salary cap system probably could not withstand a legal challenge by the Players Association, especially if the owners were to take that step immediately, sources close to the situation said.
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July 10, 1991 | JOE GERGEN, NEWSDAY
Forget for a moment the stance of the New York Knickerbockers, who are pledged to defend the sanctity of an NBA contract. Put aside the claim of self-determination by Patrick Ewing, who says he is placing individual freedom above monetary compensation. Let's focus on the source of the rift that threatens to disrupt Pat Riley's championship plans before the coach blows his first whistle in New York. Clearly, it's the fault of the salary cap. A little history is in order here.
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August 6, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN
Negotiators for baseball's owners and players won't resume formal talks on management's demand for a salary cap until Wednesday, 48 hours before the players' strike deadline. There will be meetings Monday and Tuesday in New York to discuss non-economic issues. "Assuming there is ultimately an agreement on the economics, we might as well try to get everything else out of the way first," management negotiator Richard Ravitch said Friday.
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July 13, 1988 | CHRIS ELLO
The future of the Sockers and the Major Indoor Soccer League is up in the air again after a pair of meetings in Cleveland on Tuesday. In one meeting, MISL owners met with prospective buyers from Tacoma who are interested in re-activating the Star franchise. The owners, in deciding to wait until next Wednesday to hear the offer, gave the 27-person group headed by Jim Manza some time to formalize its final bid.
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December 29, 1989 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks leading up to Monday's Rose Bowl game, reporters have approached Trojans Mark Carrier and Junior Seau to talk, ostensibly, about the game, injuries or strategy. It has been somewhat of a diversionary tactic. Sooner or later, the reporters manage to steer the conversation around to The Question: Will the pair, having enjoyed excellent, high-profile seasons, turn their backs on their final season of eligibility and opt for the NFL draft?
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May 22, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
To the surprise of absolutely no one, Terry Kennedy kept cursing out loud Tuesday night, not because the Padre-Met game was postponed because of rain, but because this baseball season may soon be postponed because of stubbornness. Kennedy, the Padre player representative, spent his lunch hour on Tuesday with Don Fehr, acting executive director of baseball's player association.
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November 12, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan and Eric Pincus
The Lakers haven't given up on Steve Nash. Unlike some of their followers, they're not pushing him into an early retirement. "There's always going to be a debate but we're not going to debate it, talk about it," Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni said Tuesday. "He's going to try to get ready, he's going to try to play and we're going to try to win. It's really simple for us. It's not real difficult. " Nash has already missed three of nine games and is out at least two more weeks because of nerve damage in his back, the latest injury to hit him since he joined the Lakers.
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August 8, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The hardest sell at the Staples Center's Team L.A. store might be a Lakers jersey with the name "Cap Room" on the back. "They're a mess," former Lakers coach Phil Jackson said in June. "We know that because of their financial disorder right now, that's the thing they have to get straight right away. " The Lakers haven't been under the NBA's salary cap since before the 1996-97 season, though the franchise has won five titles since then. But with Dwight Howard having gone to Houston and Kobe Bryant facing an uncertain return date from Achilles' tendon surgery, the Lakers' prospects on the court next season are anything but certain.
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July 9, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
With the NBA releasing its new salary cap figures on Tuesday night, the Lakers' numbers show the Lakers could pay almost $25 million in luxury tax for the coming season. While the salary cap has been set at $58.679 million, the significant number for the Lakers is the tax threshold -- which came in slightly over previous league estimates at $71.748 million. For the first time in NBA history, the tax climbs incrementally with each additional $5 million in payroll. The Lakers have $80.56 million in guaranteed contracts with eight players.
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July 6, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Smart money The divorce of Dwight Howard and the Lakers might be the biggest story in town, and NBA legend Magic Johnson is an owner of the Dodgers. So the L.A. sports fan ought to appreciate that the best moves the Dodgers made last week included trading for cap space. There is no salary cap for major league players, but the new collective bargaining agreement caps what teams can spend on amateurs. After Bob Engle , the Dodgers' vice president of international scouting, determined the team needed more cap space to pursue players around the world, the Dodgers traded reliever Matt Guerrier to the Chicago Cubs for reliever Carlos Marmol . Dodgers fans vented about why their team would want the erratic Marmol, but what the Dodgers really wanted was the additional $200,000 in international cap space the Cubs included in the trade.
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June 22, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The rules changed when the league adopted the 2011 collective bargaining agreement, but Lakers executive and owner Jeanie Buss is confident the franchise will navigate its way back to the top. "We are in 100% in support of those agreements, but as much as they'd like to try to revenue share and make things equal -- our basketball expertise, they can't revenue share away from us," Buss said.  "I believe that as they keep trying to make things more...
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May 22, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Brian Urlacher is the latest NFL fixture to bid farewell to his football career. The Chicago Bears All-Pro linebacker announced his retirement Wednesday on Twitter, linking to a longer statement: “After spending a lot of time this spring thinking about my NFL future, I have made a decision to retire,” Urlacher wrote in a statement. “Although I could continue playing, I'm not sure I would bring a level of performance or passion that's up to my standards. When considering this, along with the fact that I could retire after a 13-year career wearing only one jersey for such a storied franchise, my decision became pretty clear.
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March 2, 1988 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Socker goalkeeper Jim Gorsek was looking forward to next season for financial reasons. That has become a scary thought for a player in the Major Indoor Soccer League. Last Friday, the MISL Board of Directors called for the Players Assn. to reduce the salary cap from $1.275 million per team to $898,000 ($850,000 for the regular roster and $48,000 for four developmental players) for the 1988-89 and 1989-90 seasons, and to eliminate all guaranteed contracts.
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October 8, 1990 | MIKE KAHN, MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE
At first glance, it was your basic "Oh wow, what another great move by Magic." That's the kind of reaction Los Angeles Lakers guard Magic Johnson provokes, particularly when he asks if he can give back $100,000 of his salary as he did two weeks ago. It allowed the Lakers to maneuver the salary cap enough to acquire Terry Teagle and his $600,000 contract. "I did it because I want to win," Johnson said. "Of course, that's the most important thing." It is for all the NBA teams.
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May 5, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan
Poor Lakers. Even if Dwight Howard walks and Metta World Peace gets amnestied, they're still too far over the salary cap to chase any big-name free agents. Silly NBA rules. Along those lines, a sad-looking quote stood out as players and staffers slogged through two days of end-of-season meetings last week - except Antawn Jamison, who skipped them as a final goodbye to the team and Mike D'Antoni. "The collective-bargaining agreement really limits how we can add to the team," Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak said.
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April 14, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak was clear Saturday that the team has no intention to use their one-time amnesty on Kobe Bryant. "That's not even something that we've discussed," Kupchak said. "That's the furthest thing from our mind right now. " Bryant, who tore his left Achilles' tendon Friday night, underwent surgery Saturday and is projected to be out for a minimum of six to nine months. Between July 10 and 17, the Lakers can amnesty a single player who was under contract before the 2011-12 season.
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