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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Even from his earliest days as a musician, Rob Zombie displayed a deep-rooted interest in aesthetics and visual style, in creating an entire world stewed in a distinctive brew of horror movies, true crime, the occult and general weirdness. His latest film as writer and director, "The Lords of Salem," might be his most undiluted vision yet, a movie intended as a contraption for unsettling audiences, a mood piece meant to evoke a particularly dark turn of mind. PHOTOS: Movies Sneaks 2013 Set in modern-day Salem, Mass., the story concerns the spiraling downfall of a local radio DJ (played by Sheri Moon Zombie, the filmmaker's wife and something like the Leslie Mann to his horror Judd Apatow)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
"Salem," the first original series from WGN America, drew 2.3 million viewers over four airings in its first night, according to Nielsen.  The premiere telecast at 7 p.m. Pacific Time on Sunday (10 p.m. ET) delivered 1.5 million viewers overall and 647,000 people in the key 18- to 49-year-old demographic. In the key demo, that's more than seven times what the cable channel has delivered on average in the time slot this season.  "We are thrilled with the audience turnout and reaction to 'Salem,'" said Matt Cherniss, president and general manager of WGN America and Tribune Studios, in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
When Rob Zombie was growing up in Massachusetts, not too far from the notorious town of Salem, his elementary school would take field trips there to see reenactments of the witch trials. So perhaps it's no surprise that the musician and filmmaker has now made “The Lords of Salem,” which premiered Monday night in the Midnight Madness slot at the Toronto International Film Festival. Though as a filmmaker Zombie went from such grungy projects as "House of 1,000 Corpses" and “The Devil's Rejects” to slicker, more commercial work like his two “Halloween” movies, this is his darkest, most unnerving film yet. “My world exists sort of in that cult world,” Zombie said in an interview Tuesday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It seems strange to recall that just a few years ago, the scripted drama was on a death watch. Threatened by premium cable, falling ratings, reality television and the omnipotent menace of "the Internet," the hourlong nighttime drama seemed on the way of the variety show. Now, of course, everyone with a network is seeking to rebrand itself with some highly produced historical drama or another. "Salem," which debuts Sunday, is Tribune-owned WGN America's maiden voyage into the roiling waters of scripted drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
SHREVEPORT, La. - A woodsy stretch of Willow Lake Farm, just outside this city, has been painstakingly built to look like a 17 t h century New England village, filled with shops and houses with steep-pitched roofs and drab clapboard exteriors. Milling about nearby are women in elaborate capes and cinched dresses, and men clad in peasant shirts and heavy coats. It's all textbook quaint - until you see the towering gallows at the center of town. This is the setting for "Salem," the new TV series from Tribune Co.'s WGN America set in the Massachusetts village that was the scene of notorious Colonial witch trials.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal jury Monday convicted John M. Hubbard III on 29 counts for the planting of 13 bombs around Salem, none of which exploded. The prosecutor said Hubbard was motivated by his lifelong rivalry and hatred for state Rep. Frank Newkirk Jr., a Democrat from Salem. "He resented him for a lifetime of accomplishments . . . " Assistant U.S. Atty. Robert Stanley Powell said in closing arguments Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997
Re 1st Lt. Kelly Flinn: Why does the position of the Air Force remind me so much of the Salem witch hunts? FRANK R. LAWRENCE Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001
Dianne Bates' "Taking Back the Night" cover story (Oct. 25) contained a startling reference to "that nasty witch-burning business in Salem, Mass." Stop the presses and alert the Pulitzer committee! Bates has revealed a new and hitherto unknown event in American history. Nineteen people were hanged at Salem, and one died by "pressing" (a form of torture meant to elicit confession). However, none was burned. J. R. BOYER Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
They are, in some ways, just like ordinary kids. They like roller-skating and eating pizza and the music of Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson. But they also lie awake at night and worry. They have nightmares and sometimes wet their beds. Some have asked adults to hit them because they believe it will help them to be better behaved. Simple math and reading are a mystery to some--even the older ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
SHREVEPORT, La. - A woodsy stretch of Willow Lake Farm, just outside this city, has been painstakingly built to look like a 17 t h century New England village, filled with shops and houses with steep-pitched roofs and drab clapboard exteriors. Milling about nearby are women in elaborate capes and cinched dresses, and men clad in peasant shirts and heavy coats. It's all textbook quaint - until you see the towering gallows at the center of town. This is the setting for "Salem," the new TV series from Tribune Co.'s WGN America set in the Massachusetts village that was the scene of notorious Colonial witch trials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Jack Leonard
A lawyer for a judge on trial for allegedly shoving a woman after a dispute over a bag of dog waste compared the case to the Salem Witch trials on Wednesday and accused the Los Angeles city attorney's office of unethically pursuing his client. Attorney James Blatt told jurors during closing arguments that city prosecutors had failed to adequately investigate the allegations and relied solely on the word of the victim, whom Blatt described as mentally ill. Blatt said the city attorney's office was more interested in "going after that big target" than listening to Superior Court Judge Craig Richman's account of what happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Salem" carries a warning: Witches are real, but they are not who or what they seem to be. The drama, which will premiere April 20 on WGN America as its first original series, explores what really fueled the town's infamous witch trials while exploring the dark and supernatural truth behind them. Set in the late 1600s, "Salem" revolves around an epic romance and "bolder new vision of witches," producers said. In this case, the witches are the witch-hunters. FULL COVERAGE: Winter Television Preview Brannon Baga, creator and executive producer of the series, described the concept as " 'Wuthering Heights' meets "The Exorcist.' " "Our take on this show is that witches are real," said Baga ("24")
SPORTS
November 15, 2013 | Staff and wire reports
Winston-Salem State quarterback Rudy Johnson was beaten and charges were filed against Virginia State's Lamont Daniel Britt after players from the two teams fought in a restroom during a luncheon for the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Assn. championship-game contenders at Winston-Salem, N.C. The conference announced that the title game set for Saturday at Winston-Salem has been canceled. The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Assn. released a statement Friday on the WSSU website announcing the decision to cancel the football game as well as the volleyball championships, which in part read: "Based on the incident that occurred today, and after consulting with the leadership of each institution and the Football and Volleyball championship committees, the CIAA is saddened to announce that this weekend's Football and Volleyball conference championships that were scheduled to take place in Winston-Salem have been canceled.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Salem Communications Corp. makes money the "right" way. The Camarillo company operates a conservative, Christian-themed media conglomerate with 99 U.S. radio stations, a publishing company and several websites, including christianity.com, godtube.com and biblestudytools.com. "Our plan is to super-serve the audience interested in Christian-themed, family-themed and conservative content," said Edward G. Atsinger III, the company's co-founder and chief executive. Its target audience - adults 35 to 64 years old - can listen to Christian music and conservative talk on the radio, watch Christian videos online and get news in a format that will inform but not offend, Atsinger said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Even from his earliest days as a musician, Rob Zombie displayed a deep-rooted interest in aesthetics and visual style, in creating an entire world stewed in a distinctive brew of horror movies, true crime, the occult and general weirdness. His latest film as writer and director, "The Lords of Salem," might be his most undiluted vision yet, a movie intended as a contraption for unsettling audiences, a mood piece meant to evoke a particularly dark turn of mind. PHOTOS: Movies Sneaks 2013 Set in modern-day Salem, Mass., the story concerns the spiraling downfall of a local radio DJ (played by Sheri Moon Zombie, the filmmaker's wife and something like the Leslie Mann to his horror Judd Apatow)
HEALTH
January 26, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Every once in a while, hard science has a cosmetic payoff. We use botulinum toxins to erase wrinkles, and lasers to remove unwanted hair. Now a company called Jane Beauty is promising to apply scientific principles for another purely cosmetic purpose: longer, thicker eyelashes.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | LARRY HARNISCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light does not easily penetrate the clouded story of Betty Short, a 22-year-old unemployed cashier and waitress whose body was found cut in half and gruesomely mutilated 50 years ago this month in a vacant lot in Southwest Los Angeles. The unsolved killing remains Los Angeles' premier myth noir, a tale of a tragic beauty clad in black, prowling the night life, a cautionary fable that rings as true today as it did in 1947. The legend insists on a shadowed, epic tone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
When Rob Zombie was growing up in Massachusetts, not too far from the notorious town of Salem, his elementary school would take field trips there to see reenactments of the witch trials. So perhaps it's no surprise that the musician and filmmaker has now made “The Lords of Salem,” which premiered Monday night in the Midnight Madness slot at the Toronto International Film Festival. Though as a filmmaker Zombie went from such grungy projects as "House of 1,000 Corpses" and “The Devil's Rejects” to slicker, more commercial work like his two “Halloween” movies, this is his darkest, most unnerving film yet. “My world exists sort of in that cult world,” Zombie said in an interview Tuesday afternoon.
WORLD
October 2, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Blank stares and double takes follow him from the moment he enters the downtown Ramallah square, where thousands have gathered to celebrate the Palestinians' statehood bid at the U.N. That distinctively large nose. The green fatigues. A scruffy, gray beard. And of course the signature black-and-white kaffiyeh. Wait … is that? Waving a giant Palestinian flag, the Yasser Arafat impersonator bellows to the crowd: "National unity!" He is instantly mobbed by laughing spectators, all wanting to pose for the spray of cellphones cameras.
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