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Salem Teikyo University

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OPINION
March 25, 1990 | Carroll Doherty, Carroll Doherty is a Washington-based free-lance journalist
The circular announces a seminar at the local college, not the topic you might expect for what appears to be a typical Appalachian mountain hamlet: "Japanese and Americans: Likes/Dislikes, Values, Customs, Differences." Ever since last July, when Salem College announced a merger with Japan's Teikyo University, things unexpected have become the norm.
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NEWS
July 8, 1991 | BILL STEIGERWALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a country kid growing up on a cattle farm in West Virginia, Dale Jones' chances of finding the Japanese girlfriend he always dreamed of were mighty slim. But in 1989, the world Jones lived on suddenly got a whole lot smaller. Salem College--the little, perennially poor, 101-year-old liberal arts school in north-central West Virginia where he was a communications major--was bought by wealthy Teikyo University of Japan. Now, Salem College had been rescued from imminent closure.
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NEWS
July 8, 1991 | BILL STEIGERWALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a country kid growing up on a cattle farm in West Virginia, Dale Jones' chances of finding the Japanese girlfriend he always dreamed of were mighty slim. But in 1989, the world Jones lived on suddenly got a whole lot smaller. Salem College--the little, perennially poor, 101-year-old liberal arts school in north-central West Virginia where he was a communications major--was bought by wealthy Teikyo University of Japan. Now, Salem College had been rescued from imminent closure.
MAGAZINE
August 5, 1990 | BILL STEIGERWALD, Bill Steigerwald, a former Sunday Calendar copy editor, is a reporter and columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
THE OLD SALEM COLLEGE tennis courts on Main Street, Tomo and his Japanese pals Oni and Kai methodically slam low base-line shots at each other over a sagging net. A Sony boom-box blares a Motley Crue tape. Six local teen-age girls stand around smoking cigarettes, drinking soda and talking to several other Japanese boys. As usual, an after-school circus of 25 or so bicyclists, basketball players, skateboarders and spectators swirls around. But Tomo, Oni and Kai don't notice.
MAGAZINE
August 5, 1990 | BILL STEIGERWALD, Bill Steigerwald, a former Sunday Calendar copy editor, is a reporter and columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
THE OLD SALEM COLLEGE tennis courts on Main Street, Tomo and his Japanese pals Oni and Kai methodically slam low base-line shots at each other over a sagging net. A Sony boom-box blares a Motley Crue tape. Six local teen-age girls stand around smoking cigarettes, drinking soda and talking to several other Japanese boys. As usual, an after-school circus of 25 or so bicyclists, basketball players, skateboarders and spectators swirls around. But Tomo, Oni and Kai don't notice.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it opens its new plum-colored biotechnology laboratory at UC Irvine today, Hitachi Ltd. will become the first Japanese corporation to locate a research facility at the heart of a U.S. university. The laboratory, called Plumwood House, marks a new approach for Japanese companies trying to tap into the latest technology spawned at American universities. Until now, the Japanese have taken a subtle approach, building research laboratories on the fringes of major U.S.
SPORTS
September 11, 1994 | TERRY FREI, THE SPORTING NEWS
Less than 72 hours before Auburn held on for a 22-17 road victory over Mississippi in the 1994 opener, Terry Bowden is wired up and waiting in an Auburn studio. Via satellite, he is about to do a live shot with WBMG-TV in Birmingham about 110 miles to the northwest. When the newscast goes to a commercial, Bowden greets sports director Doug Bell, and the news comes through Bowden's earpiece that Bell's 10-month-old son, Brooks, already is 28 inches long.
OPINION
March 25, 1990 | Carroll Doherty, Carroll Doherty is a Washington-based free-lance journalist
The circular announces a seminar at the local college, not the topic you might expect for what appears to be a typical Appalachian mountain hamlet: "Japanese and Americans: Likes/Dislikes, Values, Customs, Differences." Ever since last July, when Salem College announced a merger with Japan's Teikyo University, things unexpected have become the norm.
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