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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999
A Jan. 15 letter protesting sales tax being charged on cigarette taxes incorrectly lays the blame on the State Board of Equalization when, in fact, it was the state Senate and Assembly that enacted legislation making not only cigarette taxes but also alcoholic beverage and gasoline taxes meet the definition of gross receipts as provided in the sales and use tax law and subject to tax. The State Board of Equalization administers and collects the...
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BUSINESS
September 27, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch and Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California is owed nearly $1.4 billion by auto dealers, restaurants and other businesses that collected sales taxes from buyers but didn't pass the money along to the state — a situation that is aggravating California's budget crisis. The tab is up about 25% from a year ago and has almost doubled since 2007, state records show. That money could make a significant dent in the state's $19-billion budget gap. Watchdog groups say the state's failure to collect it is particularly galling because much of the tax money has already been paid by consumers — it just hasn't been turned over by merchants to the state Board of Equalization.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999
Peter Navarro's chances of having his proposed "violence tax" enacted to stem killings (Commentary, June 11) are slim and none and slim just left town. The entertainment industry (motion pictures and television) enjoys privileged status when it comes to paying its fair share of taxes and regulatory fees. For example, in 1988 the entertainment industry championed legislation making it exempt from sales and use tax on film and sound processing and related charges. These exemptions have recently spread to its acquisitons of creative artwork and post-production (editing)
BUSINESS
December 21, 2009 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
California is targeting service businesses in its latest bid to collect more of the estimated $1.1 billion in taxes that go unpaid each year on out-of-state purchases. California is taking the step, which it said will bring in an additional $631 million over the next three fiscal years, to bridge what is projected to be a widening gap between use taxes owed and those paid as both Internet sales and the service sector continue to grow. "It's $1 billion a year now, but the concern is it's going to grow," said Annette Nellen, an accounting and finance professor at San Jose State University who writes frequently about tax issues.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2009 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
California is targeting service businesses in its latest bid to collect more of the estimated $1.1 billion in taxes that go unpaid each year on out-of-state purchases. California is taking the step, which it said will bring in an additional $631 million over the next three fiscal years, to bridge what is projected to be a widening gap between use taxes owed and those paid as both Internet sales and the service sector continue to grow. "It's $1 billion a year now, but the concern is it's going to grow," said Annette Nellen, an accounting and finance professor at San Jose State University who writes frequently about tax issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1986 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
The state Assembly on Tuesday put out the welcome mat for Harry V. Quadracci and his proposed $150-million printing plant, which legislators hope to attract to Pacoima or another California location. By a 67-1 margin, the Assembly approved without debate and sent to the Senate a measure by Sen. Alan Robbins (D-Van Nuys) that would exempt Quadracci's Quad/Graphics and other printers from paying the 6% sales and use tax on catalogues and advertising brochures sent through the mail.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Susan Greene / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Anaheim and Santa Ana are the big winners in the total third-quarter (June through August) disbursements of sales and use tax revenues by the State Board of Equalization. Several cities had higher per-capita totals, though, with Costa Mesa and Irvine leading the way. Here's the city list, based on how much each received per resident, from highest to lowest: % Change Third Quarter Third Quarter From Second Per Capita City Disbursement Quarter Disbursement Costa Mesa $2,494,260.40 +26 $27.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999
Peter Navarro's chances of having his proposed "violence tax" enacted to stem killings (Commentary, June 11) are slim and none and slim just left town. The entertainment industry (motion pictures and television) enjoys privileged status when it comes to paying its fair share of taxes and regulatory fees. For example, in 1988 the entertainment industry championed legislation making it exempt from sales and use tax on film and sound processing and related charges. These exemptions have recently spread to its acquisitons of creative artwork and post-production (editing)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999
A Jan. 15 letter protesting sales tax being charged on cigarette taxes incorrectly lays the blame on the State Board of Equalization when, in fact, it was the state Senate and Assembly that enacted legislation making not only cigarette taxes but also alcoholic beverage and gasoline taxes meet the definition of gross receipts as provided in the sales and use tax law and subject to tax. The State Board of Equalization administers and collects the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1991
County cities collectively received $19.5 million in sales and use tax revenue from the State Board of Equalization during March. The single largest amount, $2.2 million, or 11% of the total, went to Irvine; the smallest, $11,571, to Villa Park. The aggregate amount received by the cities was 20% less than the March, 1990, disbursement, and there were vast differences in the individual cities as well.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's commercial fishing industry, reeling from hard times, is attempting to resurrect a tax break worth at least $1.1 million a year. With fishing industry support, Assemblyman Gerald N. Felando (R-San Pedro) is seeking passage of legislation to exempt commercial deep-sea and charter fishing operations from the sales and use tax for diesel fuel. Twice in the past six years, the Legislature has approved temporary diesel fuel tax breaks for the state's commercial fishing vessels.
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