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Sales Tax California

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NEWS
April 25, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson on Wednesday was weighing options for financing a historic shift of health and welfare programs from the state government to the counties, including giving the counties a chance to raise the sales tax by up to half a cent to pay for the services. The transfer of programs is expected to be a key part of Wilson's new plan to close the state's record $12.6-billion budget gap.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Chris Cheng doesn't need 40 hand warmers right now, but the longtime Amazon.com customer is loading up on them anyway. With the Internet retail giant set to begin collecting sales taxes on California purchases Sept. 15, the San Francisco resident is among many tech-savvy consumers trying to cram in some last-minute tax-free shopping. Depending on where they live, Californians pay 7.25% to 9.75% in sales taxes, so the savings are substantial - especially on big-ticket items such as electronics.
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NEWS
April 24, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the state's revenue picture turns even darker, Gov. Pete Wilson is strongly considering a sales tax increase to help balance the state budget, The Times learned Tuesday. Wilson advisers only would confirm that the governor will unveil a revised budget plan Thursday that contains additional tax increases and program cuts beyond what he proposed in the $55.7-billion budget he sent the Legislature in January.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The deal struck between the California Legislature and Amazon.com late Friday was a "classic compromise," even though it would deprive the state treasury of an estimated $200 million in sorely needed revenue, according to Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento.) The truce was reached after days of intense negotiations and will allow the giant Internet retailer to wait until at least September 2012 to collect sales taxes from its California customers. Although the state Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly approved the bill, it awaits the signature of Gov. Jerry Brown, who has not said which way he's leaning.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed sales tax on newspapers and magazines began moving through the Legislature on Tuesday as part of the effort to close the state's $3.6-billion budget gap--despite vigorous lobbying by newspapers. The Senate approved the tax in a package of budget bills on which final action was expected late Tuesday. Citing press freedom, competitiveness and common sense, the California Newspaper Publishers Assn.'
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year and a half ago, part of the answer to the state's dire need for higher revenue was extending the sales tax to snack foods, candy and bottled water, passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Pete Wilson. Today, with the signatures of nearly a million Californians standing behind Tuesday's ballot measure to repeal the tax, no one--not the governor nor a single lawmaker who voted for it--has stepped forward to support keeping the tax.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson on Thursday proposed raising the sales tax by 1 1/4 cents--and state taxes overall by a hefty $6.7 billion--as a key feature of his new plan for erasing California's staggering budget deficit. In trying to close a projected revenue gap that has grown dramatically from $7 billion when he first took office in January to at least $12.6 billion today, Wilson proposed a sharing of the pain by both those who pay taxes and those who benefit most from them.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In looking for someone to pay for most of the state's $12.6-billion deficit, Gov. Pete Wilson has zeroed in on an old standby: Joe Sixpack. Joe is the name commonly used in the Capitol for average middle-class types, classic breadwinners. These days, he could just as easily be a she, and Joe--or Jo--could be white, black, brown or Asian.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Next week, Californians begin paying more for newspapers and magazines. And if Gov. Pete Wilson has his way, they also may be paying a few extra dollars each month for cable TV service. California's wealthy media industries are facing new taxes to help close the state's $14.3-billion budget deficit. And not surprisingly, this has provoked howls of protest from the affected industries, several of which historically have had an exemption from sales tax.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gus Harris, the co-owner of Oak's Jr. Market on West Jefferson Boulevard in Jefferson Park, has been choking on the intricacies of the California "snack tax" ever since it was enacted 15 months ago. Candy, he said, was easy to figure out--tax it all. Bottled water was a little harder--tax the small bottles, don't tax the big ones, he assumed. But when it came to those darned crackers--saltines, Cheez-its, Triscuits--he lost it. "After a while, it was just guesswork," Harris said. "Total chaos."
BUSINESS
July 1, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher and Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Saying it won't force California customers to pay sales tax on their Internet purchases, Amazon.com is severing ties with 10,000 small businesses and individuals here who funnel shoppers to the online bazaar through their websites. The defiant action came hours after Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation that would have required Amazon to start collecting a 7.25% base tax on online purchases Friday because it has affiliates here that are paid commissions for steering shoppers to its website.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Mindy Benham knows how to pinch a penny. That's why the Costa Mesa resident does a lot of her shopping on the Internet. She particularly favors Amazon.com Inc. because the giant e-retailer doesn't collect California state sales taxes on her purchases. "There's something about Milwaukee, where I'm from, that people take pride in how little they pay for something," said Benham, a magazine art director, who recently bought a pair of eyeglasses and a sofa online. "I don't want to pay taxes on something if I don't have to pay taxes.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2009 | Andrea Chang and Alana Semuels
Looming over the 405 Freeway near Culver City, a 50-foot-tall electronic sign for Airport Marina Ford has flashed "buy now" in bright red letters for the last month, a reminder to passing motorists to beat the April 1 sales tax increase. "The clock is ticking," said Dan Theroux, general manager of the car dealership. "If you're buying a new car, it's going to save you hundreds of dollars to buy before the end of the month."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis' administration is expected to confirm today that state sales taxes will rise next year by a quarter of a cent, a development eagerly awaited by Republicans who want to make taxes an issue in next year's elections. A 1991 law enacted by Davis' Republican predecessor provided that in good times--when the state budget surplus tops 4% of the general fund for two years straight--the state sales tax automatically drops by one-fourth of 1% for one year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | HUGO MARTIN and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Following through on a deal reached during budget deliberations, Gov. Gray Davis will launch a campaign in support of a constitutional amendment to earmark state sales tax on gasoline for transportation projects, administration sources said. Davis will kick off his public campaign today at a ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the first segment of a 28-mile extension of the Foothill Freeway under construction in Rialto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | ALEX GRONKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parm Bains, the owner of a truck stop on California 99 south of Yuba City, used to sell 100 hockey-puck-sized containers of Copenhagen and Skoal chewing tobacco a week. Now he's lucky to sell 10. Since July 1, he has heard customers vow to quit chewing, and he has seen good ol' boys switch from Red Man tobacco to Extra sugar-free gum. Their conversion reflects neither health concerns nor changing tastes. It's about cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1991 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new California sales tax on periodicals has a quixotic effect: The state is taxing its own university libraries. The libraries, which subscribe to esoteric and expensive academic journals, will shell out nearly $3 million this year in taxes for them. UC San Diego alone will face a $182,000 sales tax bill for periodicals, and San Diego State University will have to fork over $100,000.
NEWS
July 17, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state Assembly passed California's estimated $101-billion budget Monday without granting Republican demands to continue a quarter-cent cut of the state sales tax. Monday's vote by the lower-house lawmakers on the state's 2001-02 spending plan dragged into the evening before Democrats managed to scrape together the four Republican votes needed to win two-thirds majority support for the document. They approved the budget--which was 16 days overdue--on a 54-26 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after Senate Republican lawmakers blocked passage of a $101-billion state budget, their Assembly counterparts followed suit, uniting against the spending plan. The refusal of Republicans in both houses of the Legislature is expected to trigger a new round of negotiations on disputed issues, including a controversial demand by Republicans that a quarter-cent reduction of the state sales tax be preserved.
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