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NEWS
December 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Florida legislators agreed Thursday to kill an unpopular 5% tax on services that sparked an uproar in the advertising industry, angered voters and politically damaged many state leaders. The tax will be repealed Jan. 1, after months of bitter, partisan infighting and three special legislative sessions. But lawmakers also agreed to increase the state sales tax on goods from 5% to 6%. That increase would add $1.2 billion a year to state coffers beginning Feb.
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NEWS
April 24, 1987
The Florida Legislature passed a $761-million bill that applies the state's sales tax to most services, and Gov. Bob Martinez quickly signed the measure into law. The bill was promoted as a way for Florida to pay for the additional roads, schools, and jails needed to accommodate a fast-growing population. The sales tax covers such services as advertising and fees charged by lawyers, accountants, engineers and others.
NEWS
October 14, 1987
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez carried out his promise to veto a bill that would have thrown Florida's services tax controversy to voters in a Jan. 12 referendum. The Republican governor promised a veto last week after the bill was passed at the end of a three-week special legislative session. The governor called lawmakers back to Tallahassee for another special session that began Monday.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | Associated Press
Florida legislators agreed Thursday to kill an unpopular 5% tax on services that sparked an uproar in the advertising industry, angered voters and politically damaged many state leaders. The tax will be repealed Jan. 1, after months of bitter, partisan infighting and three special legislative sessions. But lawmakers also agreed to increase the state sales tax on goods from 5% to 6%. That increase would add $1.2 billion a year to state coffers beginning Feb.
NEWS
October 13, 1987
Florida lawmakers trickled back to the Capitol in Tallahassee to try again to resolve a dispute over a new services tax, as one legislator filed suit contending the governor is holding the Legislature hostage and has exceeded his authority. State Rep. Elvin Martinez of Tampa asked the state's Supreme Court to stay the special session. The Legislature, called back into session for a fourth consecutive week, convened long enough to recess until later this week.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | DAN SEWELL, Associated Press
Fed up with harsh winters and a bleak economy in East Lansing, Mich., Jane Fitzpatrick and her husband dreamed of life by the sea in sunny South Florida. They considered the teeming Atlantic "Gold Coast" first, but there was culture shock in Latinized Miami and in the nearly solid line of high-rises on the beaches stretching to West Palm Beach.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
NEWS
April 24, 1987
The Florida Legislature passed a $761-million bill that applies the state's sales tax to most services, and Gov. Bob Martinez quickly signed the measure into law. The bill was promoted as a way for Florida to pay for the additional roads, schools, and jails needed to accommodate a fast-growing population. The sales tax covers such services as advertising and fees charged by lawyers, accountants, engineers and others.
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