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Sales Tax Japan

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BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | From United Press International
Consumer prices in Tokyo in 1989 posted the highest year-on-year rise since 1986, the government's preliminary figures showed Tuesday. Japan also reported that its nationwide unemployment rate remained at a stable 2.2% in November. The Management and Coordination Agency said Tokyo's consumer prices in 1989 rose 2.7% over the previous year, surpassing a 2.0% year-on-year rise for the first time since 1986. The agency said the rise was owed chiefly to the introduction in April of the 3.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to spur Japan's recovery that drew only lukewarm praise from the United States, Parliament gave final approval Friday to a reform package that immediately slashes the income tax but later raises the sales tax. The income tax cuts--$56 billion in 1995 and $36 billion for 1996 and subsequent years--are due to be roughly balanced starting from 1997 by increased taxes on purchases of goods and services.
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NEWS
April 16, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Amid pushing and shoving, the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Wednesday rammed its budget bill through the Finance Committee of the lower house of Parliament. The move touched off opposition calls for Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone to resign and the first signs of rebellion in his party.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | From United Press International
Consumer prices in Tokyo in 1989 posted the highest year-on-year rise since 1986, the government's preliminary figures showed Tuesday. Japan also reported that its nationwide unemployment rate remained at a stable 2.2% in November. The Management and Coordination Agency said Tokyo's consumer prices in 1989 rose 2.7% over the previous year, surpassing a 2.0% year-on-year rise for the first time since 1986. The agency said the rise was owed chiefly to the introduction in April of the 3.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
An estimated 35,000 people marched through Tokyo to protest a proposed sales tax in an unusual display of opposition to government, police said. No incidents were reported in the downtown rally nor in dozens of other anti-tax demonstrations organized by opposition political parties, labor unions and consumer groups around the country. The proposal to levy a 5% sales tax on most goods and services is part of a larger tax reform package unveiled by Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone in January.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Tadashi Kuranari on Wednesday called off a trip to Washington because of opposition protests over a proposed new Japanese sales tax. Earlier in the day, Kuranari had told reporters that the U.S. Congress should realize that getting emotional about America's trade deficit with Japan "won't do anybody any good" and that the two governments "should deal with the issue in a calm manner."
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
A sweeping overhaul of the tax system took effect Saturday, befuddling consumers and shopkeepers and increasing opposition leaders' calls for the resignation of Japan's already beleaguered prime minister. The centerpiece of the reform is a 3% "consumption tax" on everything from taxi rides to apartment rents. At the same time, the reform cuts corporate, inheritance, higher-level income and residential taxes by $44.6 billion in fiscal 1989.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita's much-heralded tax-reform plans are already running into trouble, only days after they were officially announced. A leading Japanese businessman called Wednesday for major changes in the tax program and said the package, which includes a new sales tax, was unlikely to win popular support. "We want changes in the plan," said Rokuro Ishikawa, chairman of the Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry. "We have not accepted it."
BUSINESS
November 26, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to spur Japan's recovery that drew only lukewarm praise from the United States, Parliament gave final approval Friday to a reform package that immediately slashes the income tax but later raises the sales tax. The income tax cuts--$56 billion in 1995 and $36 billion for 1996 and subsequent years--are due to be roughly balanced starting from 1997 by increased taxes on purchases of goods and services.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1989 | From United Press International
The Japanese, already saddled with the highest living expenses in the developed world, are going to be shelling out even more for most goods and services they purchase starting today. A controversial and unpopular 3% sales tax, the first of its kind in Japan, takes effect at midnight Friday amid a chain of revolts by local governments and widespread protests by consumers.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
A sweeping overhaul of the tax system took effect Saturday, befuddling consumers and shopkeepers and increasing opposition leaders' calls for the resignation of Japan's already beleaguered prime minister. The centerpiece of the reform is a 3% "consumption tax" on everything from taxi rides to apartment rents. At the same time, the reform cuts corporate, inheritance, higher-level income and residential taxes by $44.6 billion in fiscal 1989.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1989 | From United Press International
The Japanese, already saddled with the highest living expenses in the developed world, are going to be shelling out even more for most goods and services they purchase starting today. A controversial and unpopular 3% sales tax, the first of its kind in Japan, takes effect at midnight Friday amid a chain of revolts by local governments and widespread protests by consumers.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita's much-heralded tax-reform plans are already running into trouble, only days after they were officially announced. A leading Japanese businessman called Wednesday for major changes in the tax program and said the package, which includes a new sales tax, was unlikely to win popular support. "We want changes in the plan," said Rokuro Ishikawa, chairman of the Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry. "We have not accepted it."
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Amid pushing and shoving, the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Wednesday rammed its budget bill through the Finance Committee of the lower house of Parliament. The move touched off opposition calls for Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone to resign and the first signs of rebellion in his party.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Foreign Minister Tadashi Kuranari on Wednesday called off a trip to Washington because of opposition protests over a proposed new Japanese sales tax. Earlier in the day, Kuranari had told reporters that the U.S. Congress should realize that getting emotional about America's trade deficit with Japan "won't do anybody any good" and that the two governments "should deal with the issue in a calm manner."
NEWS
March 2, 1987
An estimated 35,000 people marched through Tokyo to protest a proposed sales tax in an unusual display of opposition to government, police said. No incidents were reported in the downtown rally nor in dozens of other anti-tax demonstrations organized by opposition political parties, labor unions and consumer groups around the country. The proposal to levy a 5% sales tax on most goods and services is part of a larger tax reform package unveiled by Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone in January.
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