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BUSINESS
February 27, 1998 | JODI WILGOREN and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With President Clinton's backing and strong bipartisan support in Congress, a bill to freeze new taxes on goods sold over the Internet is likely to pass next month, despite opposition from most of the nation's governors. "There should be no special breaks for the Internet, but we can't allow unfair taxation to weigh it down and stunt the growth of the most promising new economic opportunity in decades," Clinton said Thursday while attending the Technology 1998 conference here.
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NEWS
April 28, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the price of beer goes up, teenage gonorrhea goes down, federal health officials say. Data released Thursday by the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that a tax increase of 20 cents per six-pack nationwide could reduce gonorrhea rates in young people by almost 9%. Why?
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NEWS
March 18, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writers
Congressional Democrats began the budget-writing season in deep disarray Tuesday as their leaders fought over the source and size of possible tax increases to help close the huge federal budget gap. House Budget Committee Chairman William H. Gray III (D-Pa.) said he is looking for new tax revenues and could support an increase in the gasoline tax, a new federal sales tax or a delay in lowering the rates for upper-income people. An angry Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1998 | JODI WILGOREN and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With President Clinton's backing and strong bipartisan support in Congress, a bill to freeze new taxes on goods sold over the Internet is likely to pass next month, despite opposition from most of the nation's governors. "There should be no special breaks for the Internet, but we can't allow unfair taxation to weigh it down and stunt the growth of the most promising new economic opportunity in decades," Clinton said Thursday while attending the Technology 1998 conference here.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
Businesses specializing in the sale of costly cars and boats are being pushed into financial decline by the nation's tax on luxury products, witnesses told a Republican congressional panel Monday. "We are in jeopardy," William C. Parsons, president of Palmer Johnson yacht builders of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., told members of the House Republican Study Committee. "Our clients can afford to pay the 10% luxury tax; they simply are choosing not to," Parsons said.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the "no new taxes" taboo lifted by the White House, President Bush and Republican congressional leaders began Tuesday the politically treacherous task of considering possible tax hikes, including a national sales tax, according to a participant in the talks. Despite the President's decision that budget talks with Congress would be "unfettered" by preconditions, however, White House officials and others said that one form of revenue increase remained off limits: higher income taxes.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
Switching from a federal income tax to a national sales tax would create an economic boom followed by a bust and, later on, a permanent increase in prices, a Federal Reserve Board member said Wednesday. Lawrence Lindsey's remarks delivered a blow to the national retail sales tax idea championed by presidential candidate Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) and against proposals for imposing other consumption taxes such as the value-added tax, which is levied at each stage of production.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Charging other presidential candidates with "a conspiracy of evasion" in dealing with the federal budget deficit, Democratic White House aspirant Bruce Babbitt Thursday outlined a plan for a national sales tax to take in about $50 billion a year, the most ambitious revenue-raising proposal yet advanced in the 1988 campaign.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the price of beer goes up, teenage gonorrhea goes down, federal health officials say. Data released Thursday by the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that a tax increase of 20 cents per six-pack nationwide could reduce gonorrhea rates in young people by almost 9%. Why?
BUSINESS
September 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
Switching from a federal income tax to a national sales tax would create an economic boom followed by a bust and, later on, a permanent increase in prices, a Federal Reserve Board member said Wednesday. Lawrence Lindsey's remarks delivered a blow to the national retail sales tax idea championed by presidential candidate Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) and against proposals for imposing other consumption taxes such as the value-added tax, which is levied at each stage of production.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
Businesses specializing in the sale of costly cars and boats are being pushed into financial decline by the nation's tax on luxury products, witnesses told a Republican congressional panel Monday. "We are in jeopardy," William C. Parsons, president of Palmer Johnson yacht builders of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., told members of the House Republican Study Committee. "Our clients can afford to pay the 10% luxury tax; they simply are choosing not to," Parsons said.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the "no new taxes" taboo lifted by the White House, President Bush and Republican congressional leaders began Tuesday the politically treacherous task of considering possible tax hikes, including a national sales tax, according to a participant in the talks. Despite the President's decision that budget talks with Congress would be "unfettered" by preconditions, however, White House officials and others said that one form of revenue increase remained off limits: higher income taxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | JOHN DART and RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITERS
Prompted by a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding state sales taxes on religious items and books, Jehovah's Witnesses have instructed their 817,000 U.S. members not to suggest any price for the books and magazines they offer door-to-door. Jehovah's Witnesses, known for their doomsday predictions and doorway persistence, will still seek donations but will no longer ask 25 cents each for copies of Awake! and Watchtower magazines or specific dollar amounts for their books.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1989 | S. J. DIAMOND
It seemed a modest bill, authorizing state sales tax on hitherto untaxed mail-order purchases. Nevertheless, it has generated inordinate noise in government, industry and the press. Supporters get excited about new revenue for hungry states--the buyers' states, not the sellers'. Critics say calculating and collecting four dozen different taxes will be impossible for mail-order companies and may mean the end of the business.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1988 | Associated Press
The nation's poorest families, with incomes averaging less than $8,600 a year, pay five times as much of their earnings for state sales and excise taxes as those who make more than $600,000, a research and advocacy group reported Thursday. "The less you make, the worse you do," Robert S. McIntyre, director of Citizens for Tax Justice, said in releasing a comprehensive study of taxes in the 50 states.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990 | JOHN DART and RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITERS
Prompted by a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding state sales taxes on religious items and books, Jehovah's Witnesses have instructed their 817,000 U.S. members not to suggest any price for the books and magazines they offer door-to-door. Jehovah's Witnesses, known for their doomsday predictions and doorway persistence, will still seek donations but will no longer ask 25 cents each for copies of Awake! and Watchtower magazines or specific dollar amounts for their books.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1988 | Associated Press
The nation's poorest families, with incomes averaging less than $8,600 a year, pay five times as much of their earnings for state sales and excise taxes as those who make more than $600,000, a research and advocacy group reported Thursday. "The less you make, the worse you do," Robert S. McIntyre, director of Citizens for Tax Justice, said in releasing a comprehensive study of taxes in the 50 states.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Charging other presidential candidates with "a conspiracy of evasion" in dealing with the federal budget deficit, Democratic White House aspirant Bruce Babbitt Thursday outlined a plan for a national sales tax to take in about $50 billion a year, the most ambitious revenue-raising proposal yet advanced in the 1988 campaign.
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