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January 24, 2010 | By Heather John
John Fogarty is the youngest and -- at 6 feet tall -- the shortest of three brothers. He is also my husband. The first night we met, some 4 1/2 years ago, he was wearing a gorgeous wool houndstooth sport coat. Except the coat was two sizes too big, a hand-me-down from his 6-foot, 4-inch brother. Wearing his siblings' castoffs, I soon discovered, was far preferable to him than darkening the door of a men's store. Like many men I know, John had a serious aversion to shopping. That was, until he met one of L.A.'s better salesmen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Minnesota, the land of 10,000 lakes, now has 10,000 reasons to to get health insurance, too. At least that's the latest pitch from state officials launching a campaign to enroll about 1 million residents in healthcare coverage when its state-run insurance marketplace goes live Oct. 1. The state has enlisted Minnesotan folklore icons -- lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his trusty sidekick, Babe the Blue Ox -- as the face of its marketing campaign to...
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REAL ESTATE
October 28, 1990
I would like to explain my remark concerning the hardware store salesmen in my Sept. 30 article, "Newlywed Builders Learn Magic Words: Redo It," which prompted several letters. Unfortunately, the particular wording leaves the impression that my husband and I solicited salesmen for advice by tricking them into believing we were going to buy the product from their store. During our remodeling we did , in fact, buy extensive materials from our local store, Verdugo Hardware on Eagle Rock Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2012 | By Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
At 10 a.m. on a recent weekday downtown, suited workers were riding elevators up skyscrapers on Bunker Hill. Down on the sidewalks, loft-dwellers, coffee cups in hand, walked their dogs. At the corner of 5th and San Pedro streets, a few steps from the drug and alcohol rehab center, the local soup kitchen and the patch of sidewalk where he bunks most nights, Josh Richard was selling beer to other homeless men. One by one, his customers approached, handing over $1.50 for cans of Colt 45, Steel Reserve or Heineken that he kept hidden in a blue cooler beneath a shopping cart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
Three elderly San Fernando Valley women who say they were duped by two salesmen for FHP Inc., the nation's 12th-largest health maintenance organization, filed suit Thursday charging the firm with fraud. The complaint, filed on their behalf by Bet Tzedek Legal Services, a public-interest law firm, alleges that the salesmen told the women that they represented Medi-Cal and Medicare and that they could continue to be cared for by their longtime doctors if they joined the plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1994 | JAMES BENNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Kovach has made phone calls, sent faxes and flown across the country from his New Jersey home to help find his 26-year-old son, one of two Redondo Beach men who disappeared mysteriously last week from a Torrance cellular phone store. "We want to tell him that we love him and we're praying dearly for him and we want to get to the bottom of this," said Kovach, 49, who flew to Los Angeles on Saturday to help search for his son. The case has authorities baffled.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
He lives in an almost impenetrable world of fast talk and crafty deal-making. He works when others are at rest. He speaks in a private lingo, using words such as "spiffs" for cash bonuses and "Larrys," as in "Larry Laid-Outs," for dumb customers. A leering Willy Loman in a leisure suit, he even has his own inexplicable fashion sense. The car salesman, an American classic.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
One of life's largest fantasies has become fact for five North Las Vegas used-car salesmen: They have won a $7.3-million California Lotto jackpot. Now they have time and money to work on a second daydream: buying cars to go with their millionaire status. "Everybody's out picking out their dream car," was the euphoric reaction from Ted Dourbet when last week's win was announced.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
A game, a dance, an arm-wrestling match. This is how the people who sell cars for a living describe what they do. That is, when they do it these days. Customers have put the brakes on car buying this year. With some exceptions, times are harder in the nation's showrooms and car lots than they have been in nearly a decade. Business has been pretty lousy, admitted one Chevrolet salesman, who requested anonymity. "I could write a book." Another recounted a heavy negotiating session recently.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1995 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former salesmen for convicted swindler Steven D. Wymer's municipal investment operation were sued by securities regulators Tuesday over their role in allegedly helping Wymer's Newport Beach companies bilk $105 million from cities from Orange County to Iowa. Former marketing director James A. Pearce, 49, of Newport Beach, and salesman Steen Ronlov, 50, of Northglenn, Colo., outside Denver, were accused of receiving a total of nearly $2.3 million in ill-gotten gains.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2011 | By Nate Jackson and Gerrick D. Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
In the video to Pitbull's latest chart-topper, "Give Me Everything," he pours a glass of Voli vodka, careful to display the label; in the lyrics and video for his single, "Rain Over Me," he hails the vodka as the new "it" drink. In both clips, the bottle takes center stage as the rapper is swarmed by flashing neon lights, svelte models and crooning pop wingmen. Name-check references to the high life of liquor or drugs is nothing new to rap — a study released just weeks ago from the University of Pittsburgh and Dartmouth University found that for every hour that American teens listen to music, they hear more than three references to brand-name alcohol in rap/R&B/hip-hop lyrics.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged two alleged Orange County boiler-room operators and four salesmen with conducting a fraudulent green-energy investment scheme. In a complaint filed Wednesday, the SEC said that investors were told the money would go to fund an environmentally friendly energy business, but out of $11 million collected, only about $315,000 went to American Environmental Energy Inc. in Costa Mesa. The rest of the money allegedly fueled lavish lifestyles for the company's principals, Larry R. Crowder, 53, of Newport Coast and Joseph R. Porche, 51, of Aliso Viejo.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2010 | Janet Hook
Congress is shattering its longstanding reputation for being a gridlocked, lethargic, "do-nothing" institution, instead compiling a record of landmark policy changes in healthcare, financial industry regulation, economic policy and more. But at the same time, Congress is suffering sky-high levels of public disapproval, signaling a big problem for Democrats as they head into the closing months of the midterm election campaign. They are doing a lot of big things, but a lot of people do not like what they are doing.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2010 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Financial professionals are waging a heated battle over a little-noticed part of the financial reform bill moving through Congress that's all about one word: trust. For individual investors who pay professionals to help them invest or plan for retirement, it may be the most important piece of the legislation. Two similar versions of financial reform — the one approved by the Senate on Thursday and the one passed by the House in December — must now be reconciled to create a final law. Both bills contain a variety of controversial issues concerning financial regulatory changes, consumer protections, regulation of derivatives and corporate governance issues.
IMAGE
January 24, 2010 | By Heather John
John Fogarty is the youngest and -- at 6 feet tall -- the shortest of three brothers. He is also my husband. The first night we met, some 4 1/2 years ago, he was wearing a gorgeous wool houndstooth sport coat. Except the coat was two sizes too big, a hand-me-down from his 6-foot, 4-inch brother. Wearing his siblings' castoffs, I soon discovered, was far preferable to him than darkening the door of a men's store. Like many men I know, John had a serious aversion to shopping. That was, until he met one of L.A.'s better salesmen.
OPINION
December 26, 2009
A stand against greed Re "Productivity is up, workers worn down," Dec. 20 Greed, not need, eliminates most raises, even in this tough economy. Take the sporting goods company cited in the article that laid off two of its 22 employees, squeezing 20% more work from those left. The company's chief financial officer says that when the economy picks up, employees may get raises. No raises now. What would a $1 raise for 20 employees cost? There are 2,080 regular work hours in a year, so the raises would cost the company $41,600.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
The assailants, at least two men, showed up at Jesse's Auto Sales in East Los Angeles around lunchtime. They quickly hustled two salesmen, both grandfathers well known in the neighborhood, into a garage with a cracked concrete floor. The gunmen then shot the two men at close range before escaping with two cars from the lot. "Two older men, just working, taken to the back and executed," said Sgt. Richard Garcia, a homicide investigator for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Robert Abele
It ain't pretty to look at, makes a lot of noise when it runs, and has more than a few features that don't function, but the car dealership comedy "The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard" has a beater's clunky, fast-moving charm. Set in the world of crass, battle-fatigued automobile salesmen and produced by the machismo-skewering team of Will Ferrell and Adam McKay ("Anchorman," "Talladega Nights"), it doesn't set out to be the raunchiest or silliest or dumbest movie you've ever seen.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2009 | Edward Cody, Cody writes for the Washington Post.
The 2,800 residents of this pristine village isolated on a narrow finger of the gleaming Sognefjord are embarrassed, angry and eager to get their money back. So are the townspeople of Bremanger, Hattfjelldal and Hemnes, not to mention those of Kvinesdal, Narvik and Rana. The seven small communities, lodged deep in a timeless Norwegian landscape of fiords and snow-clad mountains, somehow got caught up in the go-go markets of big, distant cities such as London and New York. At the time, it seemed like an easy way for the towns to get rich.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Robert Abele
It ain't pretty to look at, makes a lot of noise when it runs, and has more than a few features that don't function, but the car dealership comedy "The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard" has a beater's clunky, fast-moving charm. Set in the world of crass, battle-fatigued automobile salesmen and produced by the machismo-skewering team of Will Ferrell and Adam McKay ("Anchorman," "Talladega Nights"), it doesn't set out to be the raunchiest or silliest or dumbest movie you've ever seen.
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