Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSalicylates
IN THE NEWS

Salicylates

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
September 13, 2009 | Jeff Coen and Jeremy Gorner
Christopher Kelly, a key figure in the federal corruption investigation of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, has died. A onetime confidant and top fundraiser for Blagojevich, Kelly was accused of using his office to leverage campaign donations and benefits for himself and his family. In a surprise move Tuesday, a day before his scheduled trial, the roofing business owner pleaded guilty to two counts of mail fraud as part of a kickback scheme to illegally obtain $8.5 million in work at O'Hare International Airport.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 13, 2009 | Jeff Coen and Jeremy Gorner
Christopher Kelly, a key figure in the federal corruption investigation of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, has died. A onetime confidant and top fundraiser for Blagojevich, Kelly was accused of using his office to leverage campaign donations and benefits for himself and his family. In a surprise move Tuesday, a day before his scheduled trial, the roofing business owner pleaded guilty to two counts of mail fraud as part of a kickback scheme to illegally obtain $8.5 million in work at O'Hare International Airport.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 16, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new study suggests artificial flavorings in foods may be good for you. They often contain salicylates, chemical cousins of aspirin, which is known to reduce the risk of heart attacks by preventing blood clots. The study found that people consume the equivalent of one baby aspirin a day from the artificial flavorings in foods. Researchers said this may help explain why fewer Americans are dying from heart attacks.
HEALTH
October 5, 2009 | Chris Woolston
The funniest ad currently running on TV features a woman who claims to have discovered an all-natural remedy for arthritis -- namely, goat tears. The woman collects the precious material by singing "Danny Boy" to her goat herd and leading one goat to a grave site. "That's your mama," the woman says plaintively. Like all good spoofs, the ad -- which actually promotes an arthritis cream called Thera-Gesic -- draws from reality. Over the centuries, people have been willing to rub all sorts of things into their sore joints.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Long-term users of the banned painkiller phenacetin are 16 times more likely than others to die of urologic or kidney disease, according to a Swiss study that some researchers believe should prompt study of the popular analgesic, acetaminophen. The study, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, followed more than 1,000 Swiss women over 20 years.
HEALTH
January 26, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
In September, things looked very bleak for the people who make and sell over-the-counter painkillers, cough syrup and throat lozenges. And things looked good for the rest of us. All that changed late last month when the flu epidemic--among the worst in the past two decades--struck Southern California and other areas of the nation with a vengeance.
HEALTH
January 7, 2002 | BARRIE R. CASSILETH
Over hundreds of years, a host of folk medicines has emerged for treating colds and flus. None cure, but many reduce the impact of symptoms. Echinacea may be the most promising and popular of the herbal remedies. Dried extracts of this daisy-like flowering plant come in tablet or capsule form and are almost universally available in health food stores and pharmacies. Echinacea has been well studied.
HEALTH
December 28, 1998 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON
Shopping, parties and family gatherings cause stress over the holidays, and then come the bills. It's enough to give you a killer headache. But be careful what you take to ease the agony. Over-the-counter pain relievers now come with a new warning aimed at people who drink regularly.
MAGAZINE
July 16, 2006 | Joy Nicholson, Joy Nicholson is the author of the novels "The Tribes of Palos Verdes" and "The Road to Esmeralda."
In the summers of my youth in Palos Verdes, after the unfair, freezing months--down to a hideous 50 degrees--the first days of hot, dry weather made life seem rational again. The veils of shoreline fog lifted, the cruel rains were chased away, even the parents weren't fighting as much. Terry towels, thick and clean, could be pulled, still damp, from humming dryers.
HEALTH
March 20, 2000 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON
Question: I read in a newsletter that Ritalin caused cancer in mice. My daughter has been on this medicine for three years to treat attention deficit disorder. I am frightened about the risk of cancer, but without medication she can't focus in school. Is there anything safer? Answer: A number of medications can cause cancer in animals. In most cases, the FDA has done nothing more than require a warning in the prescribing information.
TRAVEL
May 19, 1991 | HARRY NELSON
To stay safe in the vacation sun this summer, wear a hat and light-colored clothing and avoid midday sun. And don't forget a good sunscreen, which can provide important protection from ultraviolet radiation exposure. As an article in the May issue of FDA Consumer Magazine says, "There's no such thing as a safe tan." Tans may look healthy, but they are outward indications that damage is taking place beneath the skin.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|