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Salif Keita

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April 30, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There's nothing quite like the voice of Salif Keita. It penetrates and envelops, it grates against the nerves while embracing the spirit. It tumbles through melodies like a free-flowing waterfall, it drives the rhythm with the passionate cries and grunts of a force of nature. No wonder that Keita, born in Mali, has been a world-music star since his 1987 recording, "Soro," defined a new blend of African and Western elements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010
BOOKS Jonathan Alter The Newsweek senior editor and columnist applies decades of insight and unique access to the White House to his latest book, "The Promise: President Obama, Year One," the historic first 365 days of an administration set against the backdrop of a staggering economic crisis, two "seemingly unwinnable" wars and the stark reality of tens of millions of jobless and uninsured Americans waiting for capital "C" change....
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TRAVEL
June 12, 2005
Robert HILBURN'S "Are You Ready to Rock?!" [May 22] brought back a flood of wonderful memories of the 12 years I lived and worked as a singer and recording artist in London. Noel Gallagher was right: England's rain, cold and island isolation have long fostered a culture of introspection and guitarists laboring away at their often-lonely craft. I would add that Britain's welfare system plays an enormous role in supporting artists while they learn, work and grow. Artists can live, with their rent or even mortgage paid plus a small biweekly stipend that barely covers the bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There's nothing quite like the voice of Salif Keita. It penetrates and envelops, it grates against the nerves while embracing the spirit. It tumbles through melodies like a free-flowing waterfall, it drives the rhythm with the passionate cries and grunts of a force of nature. No wonder that Keita, born in Mali, has been a world-music star since his 1987 recording, "Soro," defined a new blend of African and Western elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN
It took Salif Keita all of three notes at the Wilshire Theatre on Saturday to show why phrases like "the golden voice of Mali" are constantly attached to the veteran singer. High and pure, full-bodied and piercing yet not shrill, his voice was the centerpiece of an impressive, 90-minute L.A. debut before 1,500 enthusiastic fans But Keita's seamless African-jazz-funk-Europop-R&B hybrid hardly qualified as a typical African music performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Close to the end of his 90-minute set at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday, Salif Keita, the veteran singer from Mali, picked up his microphone -- along with its stand -- and launched into a soaring declamatory vocal. His high, penetrating voice, one of the marvels of African music, broke through the morass of low-frequency sound that dominated the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010
BOOKS Jonathan Alter The Newsweek senior editor and columnist applies decades of insight and unique access to the White House to his latest book, "The Promise: President Obama, Year One," the historic first 365 days of an administration set against the backdrop of a staggering economic crisis, two "seemingly unwinnable" wars and the stark reality of tens of millions of jobless and uninsured Americans waiting for capital "C" change....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he finished his second number at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on Saturday, Salif Keita knew that something wasn't working quite right. Looking out thoughtfully at his capacity audience, aware that they were not grasping his lyrics, the Malian singer paused for a moment, then made a small gesture with his hands as he quietly whispered into the microphone: "Please. Get up." It was all the crowd needed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few in the audience at Salif Keita's performance Thursday at UCLA's Royce Hall understood a word that he said, but verbal comprehension has never been a vital factor in the remarkable, international success of the Mali-born singer. "What is most important is that I communicate with my listeners emotionally," he has said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is a regular contributor to Calendar
The voice of Salif Keita is what hits you first. It's a penetrating tenor with the power to cut through the most profuse thicket of rhythm. It is a sound so powerful that it takes a few moments before his remarkable visual impact also comes into focus: Stark white skin, soft, reddish blond hair, luminous dark eyes glistening behind white eyelashes. Keita, one of the great treasures of African music, is an albino from Mali. No wonder his listeners are mesmerized from the moment he walks on stage.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2005
Robert HILBURN'S "Are You Ready to Rock?!" [May 22] brought back a flood of wonderful memories of the 12 years I lived and worked as a singer and recording artist in London. Noel Gallagher was right: England's rain, cold and island isolation have long fostered a culture of introspection and guitarists laboring away at their often-lonely craft. I would add that Britain's welfare system plays an enormous role in supporting artists while they learn, work and grow. Artists can live, with their rent or even mortgage paid plus a small biweekly stipend that barely covers the bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Close to the end of his 90-minute set at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday, Salif Keita, the veteran singer from Mali, picked up his microphone -- along with its stand -- and launched into a soaring declamatory vocal. His high, penetrating voice, one of the marvels of African music, broke through the morass of low-frequency sound that dominated the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few in the audience at Salif Keita's performance Thursday at UCLA's Royce Hall understood a word that he said, but verbal comprehension has never been a vital factor in the remarkable, international success of the Mali-born singer. "What is most important is that I communicate with my listeners emotionally," he has said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time he finished his second number at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on Saturday, Salif Keita knew that something wasn't working quite right. Looking out thoughtfully at his capacity audience, aware that they were not grasping his lyrics, the Malian singer paused for a moment, then made a small gesture with his hands as he quietly whispered into the microphone: "Please. Get up." It was all the crowd needed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is a regular contributor to Calendar
The voice of Salif Keita is what hits you first. It's a penetrating tenor with the power to cut through the most profuse thicket of rhythm. It is a sound so powerful that it takes a few moments before his remarkable visual impact also comes into focus: Stark white skin, soft, reddish blond hair, luminous dark eyes glistening behind white eyelashes. Keita, one of the great treasures of African music, is an albino from Mali. No wonder his listeners are mesmerized from the moment he walks on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN
It took Salif Keita all of three notes at the Wilshire Theatre on Saturday to show why phrases like "the golden voice of Mali" are constantly attached to the veteran singer. High and pure, full-bodied and piercing yet not shrill, his voice was the centerpiece of an impressive, 90-minute L.A. debut before 1,500 enthusiastic fans But Keita's seamless African-jazz-funk-Europop-R&B hybrid hardly qualified as a typical African music performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1999
Alanis Morissette, singing in French and Hungarian, heads the multicultural, multilingual cast of "The Prayer Cycle," a new nine-movement chorale by composer Jonathan Elias that will be released by Sony Classical on March 16. Other featured vocalists include Linda Ronstadt (in Spanish), Salif Keita (Malian), James Taylor (French), the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan (Urdu) and Perry Farrell (doing a "personal chant"). . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1999
Edward Weston opened his first photography studio in Tropico--now Glendale--in 1911, just as Modernism was reaching California. A new exhibition opening today, "Edward Weston: Photography and Modernism," traces how Weston's work became increasing influenced and eventually influential in the Modernist arena.
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