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Salim Ahmed Hamdan

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NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's onetime driver and the first of only two terrorism suspects convicted at Guantanamo Bay, is being transferred from the offshore prison to his Yemeni homeland, a government lawyer familiar with the case said Monday. Hamdan, who is about 40, was found guilty of material support for terrorism by a six-member military jury in August.
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WORLD
November 26, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a former driver and bodyguard for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, arrived in his Yemeni homeland after being released from Guantanamo Bay, the Pentagon disclosed late Tuesday. The transfer Tuesday marked an end to the seven-year odyssey that began with the Yemeni's capture at a roadblock in Afghanistan as U.S. forces bombarded suspected Al Qaeda and Taliban strongholds after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
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NATIONAL
July 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Defense lawyers for an alleged Al Qaeda plotter won permission to question witnesses, including the self-proclaimed Sept. 11 mastermind, after a military judge threatened to postpone the trial. The chief prosecutor of the war crimes tribunals said a lawyer for Osama bin Laden's former driver, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, would get access to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and other "high-value" detainees at the U.S. military prison in Cuba. "We've come to the point where the government needs to move," Judge Keith Allred, a Navy captain, told prosecutors, who had warned that security concerns could hamper efforts to arrange for a lawyer to question Mohammed before the trial begins Monday.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's onetime driver and the first of only two terrorism suspects convicted at Guantanamo Bay, is being transferred from the offshore prison to his Yemeni homeland, a government lawyer familiar with the case said Monday. Hamdan, who is about 40, was found guilty of material support for terrorism by a six-member military jury in August.
NEWS
August 10, 2008 | Mike Melia, The Associated Press
Osama bin Laden's driver, who received only a 5 1/2 -year sentence, is not so different from the majority of the 265 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay: a low-level player without a proven record of terrorism. Only a small group of recent arrivals from CIA custody -- including five alleged Sept. 11 plotters -- seem to fit the profile of hard-core militants who threaten America's existence, men so dangerous that a special tribunal was needed to try them. The U.S. military officers who served as jurors in the first trial clearly weren't convinced that Bin Laden's chauffeur was as dangerous as the prosecution contended, acquitting Salim Ahmed Hamdan of charges that he conspired with Al Qaeda and convicting him mainly of driving a car. His startlingly light sentence Thursday makes him eligible for release by January.
WORLD
November 26, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a former driver and bodyguard for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, arrived in his Yemeni homeland after being released from Guantanamo Bay, the Pentagon disclosed late Tuesday. The transfer Tuesday marked an end to the seven-year odyssey that began with the Yemeni's capture at a roadblock in Afghanistan as U.S. forces bombarded suspected Al Qaeda and Taliban strongholds after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Two U.S. Army Special Forces officers who encountered terrorism suspect Salim Ahmed Hamdan after his November 2001 arrest in Afghanistan testified in secret at his trial Thursday because the events they discussed are classified. Special Forces psychologist Col. Morgan Banks and Lt. Col. Guy John Taylor, a military lawyer assigned to a Special Forces unit in Afghanistan at the time, testified for the defense for more than an hour each.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The war crimes case against Salim Ahmed Hamdan went to the military jury Monday, with defense lawyers urging acquittal to restore the world's faith in U.S. respect for the rule of law and a prosecutor accusing the defendant of having protected Al Qaeda leaders so they could "kill another day." In closing arguments, a defense attorney, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Mizer, made a surprising disclosure, suggesting that Hamdan had offered to help U.S.
OPINION
August 7, 2008
The split verdict in the trial of Osama bin Laden's former driver redeems somewhat the military commission system created to deal with alleged enemy combatants held at Guantanamo Bay. But the trial of Salim Ahmed Hamdan fell short of the highest traditions of American justice, and even if he files a successful appeal, he would not be set free. Hamdan, a Yemeni captured by Afghan warlords in 2001 and turned over to U.S.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Prosecution and defense lawyers painted broadly conflicting pictures of Salim Ahmed Hamdan on Tuesday, with the government vowing to prove that the former driver for Osama bin Laden remained a trusted aide and confidant through Al Qaeda's most heinous crimes.
NEWS
August 10, 2008 | Mike Melia, The Associated Press
Osama bin Laden's driver, who received only a 5 1/2 -year sentence, is not so different from the majority of the 265 prisoners at Guantanamo Bay: a low-level player without a proven record of terrorism. Only a small group of recent arrivals from CIA custody -- including five alleged Sept. 11 plotters -- seem to fit the profile of hard-core militants who threaten America's existence, men so dangerous that a special tribunal was needed to try them. The U.S. military officers who served as jurors in the first trial clearly weren't convinced that Bin Laden's chauffeur was as dangerous as the prosecution contended, acquitting Salim Ahmed Hamdan of charges that he conspired with Al Qaeda and convicting him mainly of driving a car. His startlingly light sentence Thursday makes him eligible for release by January.
OPINION
August 7, 2008
The split verdict in the trial of Osama bin Laden's former driver redeems somewhat the military commission system created to deal with alleged enemy combatants held at Guantanamo Bay. But the trial of Salim Ahmed Hamdan fell short of the highest traditions of American justice, and even if he files a successful appeal, he would not be set free. Hamdan, a Yemeni captured by Afghan warlords in 2001 and turned over to U.S.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The war crimes case against Salim Ahmed Hamdan went to the military jury Monday, with defense lawyers urging acquittal to restore the world's faith in U.S. respect for the rule of law and a prosecutor accusing the defendant of having protected Al Qaeda leaders so they could "kill another day." In closing arguments, a defense attorney, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Mizer, made a surprising disclosure, suggesting that Hamdan had offered to help U.S.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Two U.S. Army Special Forces officers who encountered terrorism suspect Salim Ahmed Hamdan after his November 2001 arrest in Afghanistan testified in secret at his trial Thursday because the events they discussed are classified. Special Forces psychologist Col. Morgan Banks and Lt. Col. Guy John Taylor, a military lawyer assigned to a Special Forces unit in Afghanistan at the time, testified for the defense for more than an hour each.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Prosecution and defense lawyers painted broadly conflicting pictures of Salim Ahmed Hamdan on Tuesday, with the government vowing to prove that the former driver for Osama bin Laden remained a trusted aide and confidant through Al Qaeda's most heinous crimes.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Defense lawyers for an alleged Al Qaeda plotter won permission to question witnesses, including the self-proclaimed Sept. 11 mastermind, after a military judge threatened to postpone the trial. The chief prosecutor of the war crimes tribunals said a lawyer for Osama bin Laden's former driver, Salim Ahmed Hamdan, would get access to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and other "high-value" detainees at the U.S. military prison in Cuba. "We've come to the point where the government needs to move," Judge Keith Allred, a Navy captain, told prosecutors, who had warned that security concerns could hamper efforts to arrange for a lawyer to question Mohammed before the trial begins Monday.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2005
A federal judge delayed the military commission trial of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, detainee David Hicks of Australia, pending a Supreme Court ruling on the legality of the post-Sept. 11 panels created by President Bush. U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly halted the case of Hicks, who the military says fought alongside Afghanistan's ousted Taliban regime against U.S.
OPINION
August 11, 2008
Re "Mixed verdict at terror tribunal," Aug. 7 Congratulations to The Times on its fine article describing the mixed verdict in the first Guantanamo military tribunal. The officers charged with acting as jurors were given a difficult job of participating in a seriously flawed system -- but their verdict, finding Osama bin Laden's driver guilty of "providing material support to terrorism," remains hard to accept. Essentially, they have found grade-school dropout Salim Ahmed Hamdan guilty of working as a chauffeur.
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