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BUSINESS
February 3, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors have given former stock speculator Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis immunity from further prosecution and are expected to force him to testify about any role that top officials of American Express Co. may have played in the 1986 manipulation of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock. Lewis pleaded guilty in August to three felony counts related to the incident. He was sentenced to three years on probation, fined $250,000 and ordered to perform community service at a drug rehabilitation center.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors have given former stock speculator Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis immunity from further prosecution and are expected to force him to testify about any role that top officials of American Express Co. may have played in the 1986 manipulation of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock. Lewis pleaded guilty in August to three felony counts related to the incident. He was sentenced to three years on probation, fined $250,000 and ordered to perform community service at a drug rehabilitation center.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis embodied the brash Wall Street professionals who rose to prominence in the 1980s riding takeover mania and the bull market. But like Ivan F. Boesky, Dennis B. Levine and a few others who rode this heady wave, Lewis' exuberance ultimately led to his downfall. Lewis, 50, who pleaded guilty on Wednesday to three counts of securities law violations, was both a successful deal maker and trader. He was a preeminent player in the speculative game known as risk arbitrage.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The second mistrial in the GAF Corp. stock manipulation case isn't likely to affect two other big, upcoming Wall Street trials in which the former head of the Los Angeles brokerage firm Jefferies & Co. is also due to be the main prosecution witness, prosecutors and defense lawyers said Thursday. Boyd L. Jefferies was the key witness in the GAF case, which the government now says it hopes to try a third time in early April.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The wave of indictments of well-known Wall Street figures continued Thursday with the filing of federal conspiracy and market manipulation charges against Salim B. Lewis, a leading speculator in takeover stocks, and his arbitrage firm, S. B. Lewis & Co. Lewis, 49, a former associate of Ivan F. Boesky, and his firm were accused of acting to artificially raise the market price of Fireman's Fund Corp.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis, for years one of Wall Street's brightest stars, pleaded guilty Wednesday to three federal felony counts stemming from a 1986 scheme to drive up the price of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock. Lewis, a dazzling deal maker and stock speculator, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Manhattan to a single "margin," or credit, violation; a record-keeping infraction and one count of stock manipulation in the May, 1986, episode.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis, the former Wall Street takeover speculator and deal maker, was sentenced Monday to three years on probation and fined $250,000 for his admitted role in manipulating the price of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock in May, 1986. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe also sentenced Lewis, 50, to perform several thousand hours of community service at Daytop Village, a New York organization that offers long-term residential treatment to drug addicts. Lewis' company, S. B. Lewis & Co.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis, for years one of Wall Street's brightest stars, pleaded guilty Wednesday to three federal felony counts stemming from a 1986 scheme to drive up the price of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock. Lewis, a dazzling deal maker and stock speculator, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Manhattan to a single "margin," or credit, violation; a record-keeping infraction and one count of stock manipulation in the May, 1986, episode.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis embodied the brash Wall Street professionals who rose to prominence in the 1980s riding takeover mania and the bull market. But like Ivan F. Boesky, Dennis B. Levine and a few others who rode this heady wave, Lewis' exuberance ultimately led to his downfall. Lewis, 50, who pleaded guilty on Wednesday to three counts of securities law violations, was both a successful deal maker and trader. He was a preeminent player in the speculative game known as risk arbitrage.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The second mistrial in the GAF Corp. stock manipulation case isn't likely to affect two other big, upcoming Wall Street trials in which the former head of the Los Angeles brokerage firm Jefferies & Co. is also due to be the main prosecution witness, prosecutors and defense lawyers said Thursday. Boyd L. Jefferies was the key witness in the GAF case, which the government now says it hopes to try a third time in early April.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis, the former Wall Street takeover speculator and deal maker, was sentenced Monday to three years on probation and fined $250,000 for his admitted role in manipulating the price of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock in May, 1986. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe also sentenced Lewis, 50, to perform several thousand hours of community service at Daytop Village, a New York organization that offers long-term residential treatment to drug addicts. Lewis' company, S. B. Lewis & Co.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1989 | Associated Press
Prominent Wall Street stock speculator Salim B. (Sandy) Lewis was sentenced today to three years' probation and fined $250,000 after pleading guilty to manipulating the price of Fireman's Fund Corp. stock. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe told Lewis she spared him a prison term and sentenced him to work in a drug rehabilitation clinic because "your skills should not be wasted." Lowe fined S. B. Lewis & Co.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The wave of indictments of well-known Wall Street figures continued Thursday with the filing of federal conspiracy and market manipulation charges against Salim B. Lewis, a leading speculator in takeover stocks, and his arbitrage firm, S. B. Lewis & Co. Lewis, 49, a former associate of Ivan F. Boesky, and his firm were accused of acting to artificially raise the market price of Fireman's Fund Corp.
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