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Salim Hamdan

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a telling moment about midway through Laura Poitras' riveting new documentary "The Oath," an intimate portrait of Osama bin Laden's former bodyguard, Abu Jandal, and Salim Hamdan, Bin Laden's driver, who spent years jailed at Guantanamo Bay. By this point in the film, Jandal seems familiar, an articulate and insightful man, cleverly ironic, candid about his Al Qaeda allegiance, a gentle father to his son, a religious man, not the thug...
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NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Defense lawyers in the upcoming New York terrorism trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law asked for a 45-day delay Tuesday, saying their case hinges on testimony that self-confessed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed is expected to give from his Guantanamo Bay prison cell. New York attorney Stanley Cohen said in court filings that Mohammed would receive written questions on Friday and would need at least four days to review the materials and respond, making it impossible for the federal conspiracy trial against his client, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, to begin Monday as scheduled.
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WORLD
January 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Osama bin Laden's former driver has been released from a Yemeni prison after serving a sentence for aiding Al Qaeda, his lawyer and a Yemeni Interior Ministry official said. A U.S. military tribunal convicted Salim Hamdan in August of aiding Al Qaeda and sentenced him to 5 1/2 years in prison. He had already been held for five years and a month at the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Hamdan was sent to his native Yemen to serve the rest of his sentence.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - From his cell in the heavily guarded prison at Guantanamo Bay, the presumed chief architect of the Sept. 11 terrorist plot is offering to be a key defense witness in what probably will be the only trial in New York of someone charged in connection with the World Trade Center attacks. This would not be the first time Khalid Shaikh Mohammed has emerged as a star defense witness for members of Al Qaeda. Twice, his words have minimized the role defendants played in the organization's top hierarchy.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano and Joseph Serna
A federal appeals court in Washington overturned the conviction of Salim Hamdan, a former driver for Osama bin Laden, and ruled military tribunals were not authorized to try prisoners suspected of providing material support to terrorist groups before 2006. In a 3-0 ruling, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said that material support for terrorism was not a crime under international law when Hamdan worked for Al Qaeda.  “If the government wanted to charge Hamdan with aiding and abetting terrorism or some other war crime that was sufficiently rooted in the international law of war at the time of Hamdan's conduct, it should have done so,” wrote Judge Brett Kavanaugh.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Defense lawyers in the upcoming New York terrorism trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law asked for a 45-day delay Tuesday, saying their case hinges on testimony that self-confessed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed is expected to give from his Guantanamo Bay prison cell. New York attorney Stanley Cohen said in court filings that Mohammed would receive written questions on Friday and would need at least four days to review the materials and respond, making it impossible for the federal conspiracy trial against his client, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, to begin Monday as scheduled.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - From his cell in the heavily guarded prison at Guantanamo Bay, the presumed chief architect of the Sept. 11 terrorist plot is offering to be a key defense witness in what probably will be the only trial in New York of someone charged in connection with the World Trade Center attacks. This would not be the first time Khalid Shaikh Mohammed has emerged as a star defense witness for members of Al Qaeda. Twice, his words have minimized the role defendants played in the organization's top hierarchy.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's onetime driver and the first of only two terrorism suspects convicted at Guantanamo Bay, is being transferred from the offshore prison to his Yemeni homeland, a government lawyer familiar with the case said Monday. Hamdan, who is about 40, was found guilty of material support for terrorism by a six-member military jury in August.
OPINION
August 7, 2008
The split verdict in the trial of Osama bin Laden's former driver redeems somewhat the military commission system created to deal with alleged enemy combatants held at Guantanamo Bay. But the trial of Salim Ahmed Hamdan fell short of the highest traditions of American justice, and even if he files a successful appeal, he would not be set free. Hamdan, a Yemeni captured by Afghan warlords in 2001 and turned over to U.S.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Prosecution and defense lawyers painted broadly conflicting pictures of Salim Ahmed Hamdan on Tuesday, with the government vowing to prove that the former driver for Osama bin Laden remained a trusted aide and confidant through Al Qaeda's most heinous crimes.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano and Joseph Serna
A federal appeals court in Washington overturned the conviction of Salim Hamdan, a former driver for Osama bin Laden, and ruled military tribunals were not authorized to try prisoners suspected of providing material support to terrorist groups before 2006. In a 3-0 ruling, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said that material support for terrorism was not a crime under international law when Hamdan worked for Al Qaeda.  “If the government wanted to charge Hamdan with aiding and abetting terrorism or some other war crime that was sufficiently rooted in the international law of war at the time of Hamdan's conduct, it should have done so,” wrote Judge Brett Kavanaugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a telling moment about midway through Laura Poitras' riveting new documentary "The Oath," an intimate portrait of Osama bin Laden's former bodyguard, Abu Jandal, and Salim Hamdan, Bin Laden's driver, who spent years jailed at Guantanamo Bay. By this point in the film, Jandal seems familiar, an articulate and insightful man, cleverly ironic, candid about his Al Qaeda allegiance, a gentle father to his son, a religious man, not the thug...
WORLD
January 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Osama bin Laden's former driver has been released from a Yemeni prison after serving a sentence for aiding Al Qaeda, his lawyer and a Yemeni Interior Ministry official said. A U.S. military tribunal convicted Salim Hamdan in August of aiding Al Qaeda and sentenced him to 5 1/2 years in prison. He had already been held for five years and a month at the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Hamdan was sent to his native Yemen to serve the rest of his sentence.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Williams is a Times staff writer.
Salim Ahmed Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's onetime driver and the first of only two terrorism suspects convicted at Guantanamo Bay, is being transferred from the offshore prison to his Yemeni homeland, a government lawyer familiar with the case said Monday. Hamdan, who is about 40, was found guilty of material support for terrorism by a six-member military jury in August.
OPINION
August 7, 2008
The split verdict in the trial of Osama bin Laden's former driver redeems somewhat the military commission system created to deal with alleged enemy combatants held at Guantanamo Bay. But the trial of Salim Ahmed Hamdan fell short of the highest traditions of American justice, and even if he files a successful appeal, he would not be set free. Hamdan, a Yemeni captured by Afghan warlords in 2001 and turned over to U.S.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Prosecution and defense lawyers painted broadly conflicting pictures of Salim Ahmed Hamdan on Tuesday, with the government vowing to prove that the former driver for Osama bin Laden remained a trusted aide and confidant through Al Qaeda's most heinous crimes.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Acting Solicitor Gen. Neal Katyal, in an extraordinary admission of misconduct, took to task one of his predecessors for hiding evidence and deceiving the Supreme Court in two of the major cases in its history: the World War II rulings that upheld the detention of more than 110,000 Japanese Americans. Katyal said Tuesday that Charles Fahy, an appointee of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, deliberately hid from the court a report from the Office of Naval Intelligence that concluded the Japanese Americans on the West Coast did not pose a military threat.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2005
A federal judge delayed the military commission trial of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, detainee David Hicks of Australia, pending a Supreme Court ruling on the legality of the post-Sept. 11 panels created by President Bush. U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly halted the case of Hicks, who the military says fought alongside Afghanistan's ousted Taliban regime against U.S.
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