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Salinas Valley Agriculture

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NEWS
September 17, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this agricultural valley, lettuce is king, one town holds a broccoli festival, another bills itself as the artichoke capital of the world, and people tend to be slow to speak and economical with their words when they do. Until you ask about water. Then they get downright loquacious. And testy. Real testy. Some say that if there is a seventh level of hell in California's water wars, it lies here in the Salinas Valley.
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NEWS
September 17, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this agricultural valley, lettuce is king, one town holds a broccoli festival, another bills itself as the artichoke capital of the world, and people tend to be slow to speak and economical with their words when they do. Until you ask about water. Then they get downright loquacious. And testy. Real testy. Some say that if there is a seventh level of hell in California's water wars, it lies here in the Salinas Valley.
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NEWS
November 7, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People in these parts still think of Floyd Griffin as a bit of an outsider, a Johnny-come-lately to the Kingdom of the Crispheads. He's only lived in the Salad Bowl of America since 1968--the kind of place where you sure can grow vegetables but you sure can't buy land. His "recent" arrival in itself is a minor black mark in this tight little fraternity of four-generation farm families. And then there's the way he feels about iceberg, the king of crops in the land of lettuce: He eats it.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High winds and pounding rains during the weekend caused heavy damage to California's already-soaked crops, particularly in the central part of the state and in San Diego and Ventura counties, farm experts said Sunday. The worst hit apparently have been farmers around Salinas who have already lost millions of dollars worth of crops and likely much more in damage to their land under the heaviest flooding in decades. "There's water extending clear across the Salinas Valley. . . .
BUSINESS
March 13, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High winds and pounding rains during the weekend caused heavy damage to California's already-soaked crops, particularly in the central part of the state and in San Diego and Ventura counties, farm experts said Sunday. The worst hit apparently have been farmers around Salinas who have already lost millions of dollars worth of crops and likely much more in damage to their land under the heaviest flooding in decades. "There's water extending clear across the Salinas Valley. . . .
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No town celebrates a writer before he's dead. --John Steinbeck **** John Steinbeck knew this scrabbly little hometown of his didn't much like him. Matter of fact, folks here hated him. Hated his ugly stories. Hated his pitiful characters. He wrote of whores and tramps and drunks, and of those wrung-out crop pickers, those miserable migrants. Honored them, he did. Exalted them. And spat on the growers and shippers who built Salinas into something.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writers
As regulators scrutinize the new-found genetic match between tainted spinach and manure from a nearby cattle ranch, Salinas Valley-area farmers are increasingly fearful that the long-standing coexistence of two leading agricultural practices may be in jeopardy. The breakthrough suggests that deadly E. coli O157:H7 somehow might have traveled from cattle to a spinach field, provoking an outbreak that has killed three people and sickened nearly 200 in 26 states.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People in these parts still think of Floyd Griffin as a bit of an outsider, a Johnny-come-lately to the Kingdom of the Crispheads. He's only lived in the Salad Bowl of America since 1968--the kind of place where you sure can grow vegetables but you sure can't buy land. His "recent" arrival in itself is a minor black mark in this tight little fraternity of four-generation farm families. And then there's the way he feels about iceberg, the king of crops in the land of lettuce: He eats it.
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