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NEWS
December 17, 1995
Re "Opting All Over Again for Breast Implants" (Nov. 28): As a consumer attorney involved in breast implant litigation, I have seen dozens of women whose lives have been damaged forever because of disfigurements and diseases resulting from leaking or ruptured silicone gel breast implants. Your article shows how the debate has shifted. A decade ago, women believed the claims of Dow Corning and other manufacturers that their implants would last a lifetime. Now plastic surgeons admit that implants are not forever and that autoimmune disease is a risk factor.
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NATIONAL
August 3, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
There's a destructive liquid flowing into the Gulf of Mexico — and it's not oil. It's the muddy fresh water of the Mississippi River, which has been released from southern Louisiana's vast levee system and into estuaries in greater quantities than usual. The goal has been to use the rush of fresh water to keep sticky oil from reaching the sandy shores of the state. The tactic has proved moderately successful in some areas, but the extra fresh water creates lower-than-normal salinity levels in Barataria Bay and Breton Sound, which flank the southeast portion of Louisiana that juts out into the gulf.
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NEWS
January 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Former President Richard M. Nixon was hospitalized Monday after coming down with flu during a vacation in the Bahamas. "We don't anticipate any problems. He should be fine," said Dr. Louis Elias, who admitted Nixon to the Miami Heart Institute on Monday afternoon. Nixon, 73, was suffering from mild dehydration, a temperature 1 degree above normal, fatigue and lethargy, Elias said. Nixon was receiving glucose, a saline solution and antibiotics, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2009
In the midst of delicate eyelid surgery in April 2006, a patient who was supposed to be sedated yelled that the drugs weren't working. Plastic surgeon Iraj Zandi turned to nurse Jennifer Bales: "Are you sure you gave me Demerol? Show me the bottle!" Later, staffers checking the Fremont surgery center's drug locker found hairline cracks around the tops of vials of the painkiller. Bales, they later learned, had removed the drugs in all but two of the vials, then refilled them with saline, Zandi said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2009
In the midst of delicate eyelid surgery in April 2006, a patient who was supposed to be sedated yelled that the drugs weren't working. Plastic surgeon Iraj Zandi turned to nurse Jennifer Bales: "Are you sure you gave me Demerol? Show me the bottle!" Later, staffers checking the Fremont surgery center's drug locker found hairline cracks around the tops of vials of the painkiller. Bales, they later learned, had removed the drugs in all but two of the vials, then refilled them with saline, Zandi said.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
The government ruled Wednesday that saline-filled breast implants made by two California companies can stay on the market despite warnings that they break open at "alarmingly high" rates. Giving its first formal approval of the long-sold implants, the Food and Drug Administration allowed the products to remain available as long as women are fully informed that many will have to undergo repeated surgeries. "Women should understand that breast implants do not last a lifetime," warned Dr.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosemary Hale is "very angry." Only last Thursday, she and her plastic surgeon discussed a date to replace the silicone gel implants in her problem-plagued breasts. Now, she says, she's been placed in limbo by the FDA moratorium. "I've lost my freedom of choice," says Hale, 41, an Orange County sales representative. Her breasts shrank after childbirth and breast feeding, so she had implants inserted in 1986--"just for me. I felt good about it." She still feels good about it even though she's facing the sixth operation on her breasts.
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Long-term use of nasal sprays with decongestants can cause "rebound stuffiness," in which symptoms recur and might be even worse than before taking the medicine. Over the last several years, manufacturers have introduced non-medicated nasal sprays to reduce the misery and the chance of rebounding. The newest is Nasal Moist, a saline solution that can be used as often and long as necessary, according to its manufacturer, Blairex Laboratories. It is expected in pharmacies soon.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday opened its inquiry into the safety of saline breast implants, provoking the same intensely emotional debate that surrounded the agency's decision two years ago to sharply curtail the availability of silicone breast implants. A hearing, sponsored by the FDA, was called to hear views about when manufacturers should be required to submit safety data to the agency. But it quickly turned into a public opinion forum on the implants themselves.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Biologists have tentatively blamed the deaths of an estimated 7 million fish at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area in northern Nevada on high salt levels in the nature refuge's waters, a Nevada Wildlife Department spokesman said Thursday. "I don't think that there's any doubt that they're (the fish) dying because of salinity levels," said spokesman David Rice, who added that unless the situation is reversed, the wildlife refuge faces "doom."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
State regulators this week threatened to take steps that could curb water shipments to Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley if long-sought water quality standards aren't met in the troubled Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. After decades of delays in enforcing salinity limits in the delta, the State Water Resources Control Board on Wednesday gave California's two major water projects an ultimatum: meet the standards or your delta pumping will be curbed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | PATRICIA LIEBERMAN, Patricia Lieberman is a staff scientist at the National Center for Policy Research for Women and Families, a nonprofit think tank in Washington, D.C
The Food and Drug Administration is known worldwide for having the most rigorous safety standards. Unfortunately, it lowered its standard last month when it approved saline-filled silicone breast implants. That decision will have an impact on the lives of as many as 150,000 women and teenage girls who get those implants each year. And if implant makers have their way, the FDA will approve even riskier silicone gel-filled implants next.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2000 | From Reuters
Shares of Mentor Corp. pushed higher Thursday after U.S. regulators approved continued marketing of the company's saline-filled breast implants. The Santa Barbara-based company's stock was up $6.44, or 36%, at $24.38 on Nasdaq. The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday decided that two leading brands of saline breast implants, including those made by Mentor, were safe enough to stay on the market despite "relatively high" risks of complications such as pain or leaking.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
The government ruled Wednesday that saline-filled breast implants made by two California companies can stay on the market despite warnings that they break open at "alarmingly high" rates. Giving its first formal approval of the long-sold implants, the Food and Drug Administration allowed the products to remain available as long as women are fully informed that many will have to undergo repeated surgeries. "Women should understand that breast implants do not last a lifetime," warned Dr.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A tractor-like machine that sprays salty water into the air to speed up evaporation was taken for a test drive Wednesday at the Salton Sea, where the search is on for ways to reduce the salinity in California's largest lake. The test of the Turbo Mist machine marked the first time in 40 years that any method of salinity control has been tested there. The sea is 25% saltier than the Pacific Ocean. "It's time for action," said Tom Kirk, director of the Salton Sea Authority.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Saline-filled breast implants break open at "alarmingly high" rates and require women to undergo repeated surgeries, but at least one brand is safe enough to continue selling as long as women are properly warned of the risks, a government advisory board decided Wednesday. About 130,000 American women received saline-filled breast implants last year even though the Food and Drug Administration has never declared these implants safe.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A tractor-like machine that sprays salty water into the air to speed up evaporation was taken for a test drive Wednesday at the Salton Sea, where the search is on for ways to reduce the salinity in California's largest lake. The test of the Turbo Mist machine marked the first time in 40 years that any method of salinity control has been tested there. The sea is 25% saltier than the Pacific Ocean. "It's time for action," said Tom Kirk, director of the Salton Sea Authority.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to resolve a tortuous and costly legal battle, Dow Corning Corp. reached a tentative agreement with negotiators for women with silicone breast implants Wednesday to pay $3.2 billion to settle claims by more than 170,000 women that the implants harmed their health. The settlement would compensate women based on the seriousness of injury they claim, providing up to $300,000 for those who have a severely debilitating illness.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration will open an inquiry today into the safety of saline-filled breast implants--the only breast implant still generally available--and ultimately will decide whether they are safe enough to remain on the market. Part of the deliberations almost certainly will revolve around the delicate issues of risks compared to benefits--an equation that changes dramatically when debating cosmetic enlargement versus reconstruction after mastectomy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1999 | DIANA ZUCKERMAN, Diana Zuckerman is executive director of the National Center for Policy Research for Women and Families
While news of a $3.2-billion breast implant settlement made front-page news this year, an equally important milestone passed unnoticed: For the first time, the makers of saline breast implants provided safety data to the Food and Drug Administration. The popularity of breast implants is at an all-time high--150,000 women received implants last year, most of which were saline.
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