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SCIENCE
March 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. researchers have identified all 1,116 unique proteins found in human saliva glands, a discovery that they say could usher in a wave of convenient spit-based diagnostic tests to replace the drawing of blood. As many as 20% of the proteins that are found in saliva are also found in blood, they said. The researchers hope saliva-based tests can be used to diagnose cancer, heart disease, diabetes and a number of other conditions, they report in the Journal of Proteome Research. Like a genome, which lists all of the genes in an organism, a proteome is a complete map of proteins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Wildlife officials will not be able to interview a homeless man who was apparently attacked by a mountain lion in Perris for at least five more days, state wildlife officials said Wednesday. The 48-year-old man is stable but still in very serious condition after suffering lacerations, puncture wounds and bite marks at the base of his skull, said Lt. Patrick Foy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. "We're still trying to put all the pieces of the puzzle together, and the biggest piece of the puzzle is trying to talk to him," Foy said.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | By Marlene Cimons, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration Friday approved the first AIDS test that uses saliva instead of blood to determine whether a person has been infected by the virus. But the agency warned that the saliva test is not as accurate as the current tests that use blood, and recommended blood tests to confirm the presence of the virus. The approval was one of two major actions by the agency Friday, the other being an announcement that saline breast implants will be allowed to remain on the market for at least another three years while safety studies are being conducted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
UC Riverside officials are in the process of notifying anyone on campus who may have had contact with a student advisor who was diagnosed with meningitis this past weekend. A campus spokeswoman confirmed Monday that the advisor has been hospitalized, but the severity of the case is unknown. The announcement came days after UC Santa Barbara announced a fourth case of meningitis among its students. While most were expected to fully recover, one of them, a freshman lacrosse player, had to have his feet amputated.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
It was billed as a lineup of "buzz bands" by a corporate sponsor, but Tuesday's assortment of rock at the House of Blues generated more of a low hum. Though the club was virtually empty for Nickelback discovery Theory of a Deadman, there was a core group of followers on hand to take in Audiovent's raw, grandiose sounds. Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Human saliva contains a factor that prevents the AIDS virus from infecting cells, a finding that may explain why the disease is not transmitted orally, scientists at the National Institute of Dental Research reported Thursday. Until now, there has been "a lot of very convincing, though indirect, evidence that AIDS is not spread by oral fluids," said Dr. Philip Fox, who led the research team. Nevertheless, many people, especially dental professionals, have been concerned about the risk.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration Friday approved the first AIDS test that uses saliva instead of blood to determine whether a person has been infected by the virus. But the agency warned that the saliva test is not as accurate as the current tests that use blood, and recommended blood tests to confirm the presence of the virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON RENE LYNCH and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Yavapai County prosecutors Wednesday demanded blood, saliva and hair samples from murder suspect John J. Famalaro--evidence that could prove critical if a pending autopsy determines that Denise Huber was sexually assaulted. Also included in a flurry of legal motions filed here was a defense request for an emergency hearing to bar Yavapai County sheriff's deputies from destroying handwritten notes made during their investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1995
Q: Is a dog's mouth really more sanitary than a human's? Many people believe that if you are hurt in the woods, you should have a dog lick your wound because the dog's saliva contains an antiseptic. A: A dog's mouth is no cleaner than yours, according to veterinarian Don Low of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. In fact, dogs lick so many different things that their mouths are probably much less sanitary, he said. Most saliva has a small amount of antiseptic in it, but soap and water would be much more effective to clean the wound and prevent infection.
NEWS
November 21, 2002
Regarding Samantha Bonar's "Trolling for treasures" (Nov. 14), you gave up too soon. One day on the beach with Auggie won't do it. You need to hit the Coffee Bean for a month and have 30 guys a day admire his saliva output. That's 900 guys in a month. You'll find your husband. Michael O'Connor Los Angeles
SCIENCE
June 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have pieced together the entire DNA sequence of an 18-week-old fetus without having to use any invasive tests that could result in a miscarriage - an advance that offers a glimpse of the future of prenatal testing. Using blood drawn from the mother and a sample of saliva from the father, the researchers were able to scan the fetus' genome and determine whether it contained any of the myriad single-letter changes in the DNA code that can cause a genetic disorder. They could even pinpoint which mutations were inherited from Mom, which came from Dad, and which were brand-new.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
It was 26 years ago, almost to the day, that the body of Sherri Rasmussen was discovered beaten and bloodied on the floor of the Van Nuys town house she shared with her new husband. Three bullets fired at close range were lodged in the young woman's chest, and there was a human bite mark on her arm. From the bite, investigators gathered a saliva sample on a cotton swab and sealed it in a plastic tube. At the time, it told them nothing about the killer. But, more than two decades later, it was the piece of evidence that led cold case detectives from the Los Angeles Police Department to one of their own. Now, 2 1/2 years after her arrest, the murder trial of Det. Stephanie Lazarus is set to begin.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Reporting from Hollywood, Fla. -- Drunk or impaired drivers cause plenty of problems on the nation's roadways. And, according to the first study of its kind, a frightening number of drivers are not fit to drive.   Researchers from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and two other institutions set out to randomly sample drivers' sobriety in the 2007 U.S. National Roadside Survey. Authorities stopped drivers at 300 locations in 48 states during four periods on Friday and Saturday nights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
When UC Berkeley officials came up with the idea of asking all new students to volunteer a DNA swab as part of an unusual fall orientation program, they expected to stimulate discussion. They weren't quite prepared for how much. The plan drew quick criticism from privacy watchdogs and ethicists, who said the DNA project, linked to seminars about personalized medicine, would be an unprecedented and troubling use of genetics testing by an American university. Several urged the campus to cancel or modify the project.
SCIENCE
March 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. researchers have identified all 1,116 unique proteins found in human saliva glands, a discovery that they say could usher in a wave of convenient spit-based diagnostic tests to replace the drawing of blood. As many as 20% of the proteins that are found in saliva are also found in blood, they said. The researchers hope saliva-based tests can be used to diagnose cancer, heart disease, diabetes and a number of other conditions, they report in the Journal of Proteome Research. Like a genome, which lists all of the genes in an organism, a proteome is a complete map of proteins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2007 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
A small amount of genetic material matching Phil Spector's DNA profile was found on Lana Clarkson's left breast, a courtroom expert testified Tuesday. But his genetic profile was not detected on the revolver used to shoot the actress, a Los Angeles County criminalist testified in the murder trial of the legendary record producer. Sheriff's criminalist Steve Renteria also said DNA matching Lana Clarkson's genetic markers was found in Spector's groin area.
SPORTS
November 16, 2002
We recently read that Portland's Bonzi Wells was suspended one game for spitting at Spur forward Danny Ferry. It wasn't that long ago that linebacker Bill Romanowski spat in the face of J.J. Stokes, and Roberto Alomar spat on plate umpire Jim Hirschbeck. What conclusion are we to draw from this? A. Steroids create excess saliva. B. Freud's theory of oral fixation was correct. C. The "no-fighting" rule has produced unintended consequences. David Macaray Rowland Heights
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1985
I am a dental professional and am now forced by an ordinance to be unwise in my medical decisions. AIDS victims need to be helped, but in specific places with proper and accelerated sterilization techniques and with medical professionals who freely choose to treat them.To force all those in dentistry, not to mention medicine, to expose themselves to blood, saliva, mucus membranes, aerosol spray and endless realms of infection is foolish. The City Council has not used common sense.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
JUST for the record, vampire bats don't suck. They lap. Under the cover of darkness, the mouse-sized Desmodus rotundus flies out from rocky caves to find a sleeping horse or cow. Its razor-sharp incisors carve out a tidy crater of flesh, no bigger than a Halloween M&M, usually without waking its prey. Then, perched over the welling wound, the vampire bat laps up about a tablespoon of blood -- its sole source of nourishment -- with a delicate, bright-pink tongue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2006 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles police detectives had been trailing a serial murder suspect for about a month during the summer of 2003 when they finally got their needed break. Adolph Theodore Laudenberg, then 77, thought police wanted to question him as a witness in an unrelated car theft case and agreed to meet with an LAPD investigator at a Torrance doughnut shop. As they talked, Laudenberg sipped coffee out of a Styrofoam cup and occasionally paused to wipe his mouth with a napkin.
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