Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSallie Bingham
IN THE NEWS

Sallie Bingham

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
When she was growing up on a secluded estate in Louisville, Sallie Bingham felt the presence of "this lurking something" in the Big House, the family name for the grim mansion on the Ohio River that housed her aristocratic tribe. When she went back last year for the funeral of her father, newspaper publisher Barry Bingham Sr., she felt it again, she said. "It's still there . . . the hovering presence of something unexplained that has malevolence."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 1995
Mary Caperton Bingham, 90, matriarch of a family that built up a Louisville, Ky., publishing empire that was later torn apart. The civic leader and philanthropist had risen to greet those who had praised her at a Rotary dinner, and began her response by saying she was so flattered that "the best thing would be for a big pink cloud to come down and take me away." Then she collapsed.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | MARY ANNE DOLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sallie Bingham may be a little like the Holly Hunter character in "Broadcast News." Life was so complicated for Holly, Girl Producer, that she had to start each day with a shaking-heaving-sobbing-screaming cry. Then she'd stop, take a deep breath and move on. In "Passion and Prejudice," Bingham's 1989 family memoir, this able and experienced writer gave us a primitive, bloodcurdling howl.
BOOKS
August 1, 1993 | KAREN STABINER
UPSTATE by Sallie Bingham . (The Permanent Press: $21.95, 128 pp.) On a literal level, Ann and David are rich enough to have left Manhattan for a place in the country, but their marriage is pretty much bankrupt. What galvanizes Ann's growing discomfort is Edwin, a flirtatious therapist who seems good for little beyond stirring up troubling relationships and then abandoning them.
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | Reva Berger Tooley, Tooley holds a masters degree in psychology and is a magazine journalist. and
"Women have often been silenced in history, our voices discredited or blotted out. We have been silenced to preserve elements in the hierarchy, political or social, public or private, institutional or personal. I chose to speak." Sallie Bingham's feminist voice in the prelude to her memoir, "Passion and Prejudice," has the crackle of distant Confederate gunfire.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
Mary Caperton Bingham, 90, matriarch of a family that built up a Louisville, Ky., publishing empire that was later torn apart. The civic leader and philanthropist had risen to greet those who had praised her at a Rotary dinner, and began her response by saying she was so flattered that "the best thing would be for a big pink cloud to come down and take me away." Then she collapsed.
BOOKS
August 1, 1993 | KAREN STABINER
UPSTATE by Sallie Bingham . (The Permanent Press: $21.95, 128 pp.) On a literal level, Ann and David are rich enough to have left Manhattan for a place in the country, but their marriage is pretty much bankrupt. What galvanizes Ann's growing discomfort is Edwin, a flirtatious therapist who seems good for little beyond stirring up troubling relationships and then abandoning them.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1989
Several countries have already attempted to transplant France's "Apostrophes" to their networks--unsuccessfully. Now the United States is taking a shot at it. On Sunday, the Public Broadcasting Service will introduce "Bookmark," a 26-week series featuring round-table discussions of new books with authors and editors. Hosted by Lewis Lapham, editor of Harper's magazine, "Bookmark" will be seen locally at 9 a.m. on KCET-TV Channel 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former publisher Barry Bingham Jr., who guided the Louisville Courier-Journal and Louisville Times to three Pulitzer Prizes before the newspapers were sold as the Kentucky family that owned them battled over finances, died Monday. He was 72. Bingham had been suffering from complications of pneumonia, said Donna Watson, an assistant in his office. Bingham died at his home in Louisville, Ky., his family said in a statement.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | MARY ANNE DOLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sallie Bingham may be a little like the Holly Hunter character in "Broadcast News." Life was so complicated for Holly, Girl Producer, that she had to start each day with a shaking-heaving-sobbing-screaming cry. Then she'd stop, take a deep breath and move on. In "Passion and Prejudice," Bingham's 1989 family memoir, this able and experienced writer gave us a primitive, bloodcurdling howl.
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | Reva Berger Tooley, Tooley holds a masters degree in psychology and is a magazine journalist. and
"Women have often been silenced in history, our voices discredited or blotted out. We have been silenced to preserve elements in the hierarchy, political or social, public or private, institutional or personal. I chose to speak." Sallie Bingham's feminist voice in the prelude to her memoir, "Passion and Prejudice," has the crackle of distant Confederate gunfire.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
When she was growing up on a secluded estate in Louisville, Sallie Bingham felt the presence of "this lurking something" in the Big House, the family name for the grim mansion on the Ohio River that housed her aristocratic tribe. When she went back last year for the funeral of her father, newspaper publisher Barry Bingham Sr., she felt it again, she said. "It's still there . . . the hovering presence of something unexplained that has malevolence."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|