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Sallie Trout

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July 8, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Whimsical" is the adjective applied to Sallie Trout's innovative furniture and home accessories. Floppy Poppy flower tables, egg-shaped Fin tables and Eloise storage stools ("Solving the problem of where to put a purse while sitting at the bar") typify her approach. "I want to design objects with a sense of humor that are sophisticated enough to last," she explains.
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NEWS
July 8, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Whimsical" is the adjective applied to Sallie Trout's innovative furniture and home accessories. Floppy Poppy flower tables, egg-shaped Fin tables and Eloise storage stools ("Solving the problem of where to put a purse while sitting at the bar") typify her approach. "I want to design objects with a sense of humor that are sophisticated enough to last," she explains.
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MAGAZINE
November 10, 1996 | BARBARA THORNBURG
"I wanted to design objects with a sense of humor that are sophisticated enough to endure," says 32-year-old Sallie Trout of her collection of whimsical decorative hardware. What she's created would make even a palace guard smile. Her doorknobs and finials, hooks and drapery tiebacks come in an array of offbeat motifs, from rocket ships and coffee cups to lips, eyes and hearts. There's even a drawer pull in the shape of a melting cross. She calls it "Sinead," after the rebellious Irish singer.
HOME & GARDEN
May 23, 1998 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE
It isn't easy to keep from singing a few praises from the Opera collection by the Boyd Lighting Co. of San Francisco. This collection is dramatic and bold yet fluid and graceful as an aria. The Rigoletto wall sconce, designed by Orlando Diaz-Azcuy, has strong lines with a gently sculpted arm that sweeps gracefully upward. At the end of the arm, there is one of three handmade lamp shades (red Thai silk, white Pongee silk or an ecru opaque paper) or a softly etched glass cylinder.
HOME & GARDEN
June 4, 1994 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE
If you have a craving for creepy crawlers or things that go bump in the night, drawer pulls, wall hooks and door knockers by the Gardener should satisfy your urges. The lizard drawer pull ($46), wall hook ($20) and door knocker ($50), all of wrought iron from Iron Forge in Arizona, are especially well-suited to cabinets, walls and doors in homes with a rustic motif. Originally created for a client who has an adobe house, the lizard pull is 7 inches long and 1 1/2 inches at its widest point.
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