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Sally Fox

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NEWS
February 18, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Build a better mousetrap, and the world may beat a path to your door. But breed a brilliant cotton, and you're in for trouble. Just ask Sally Fox. Fox, 34, has revived the ancient Incan science of growing naturally colored cotton--a fluffy fiber that bursts from its bolls in shades of brown and green and, she hopes someday soon, pinks and blues. Customers already are lining up to buy as much as she can grow. The problem is, the state of California won't let her grow very much of it.
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NEWS
February 18, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Build a better mousetrap, and the world may beat a path to your door. But breed a brilliant cotton, and you're in for trouble. Just ask Sally Fox. Fox, 34, has revived the ancient Incan science of growing naturally colored cotton--a fluffy fiber that bursts from its bolls in shades of brown and green and, she hopes someday soon, pinks and blues. Customers already are lining up to buy as much as she can grow. The problem is, the state of California won't let her grow very much of it.
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MAGAZINE
October 4, 1992 | Kathleen Moloney
Sally Fox envisions a day when her fields will be a cavalcade of color. But she's going about it the hard way: She's planting cotton. "My hobby was hand-spinning cloth, weaving and knitting," says Fox, 36. "I always thought about making fabric that didn't have to be dyed." Brown cotton occurs naturally and growers have experimented with various hues, but the colored fibers were always too short for machine weaving. Ten years ago, Fox, a biological insecticides researcher for Mycogen Corp.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
Levi Strauss & Co., which made its name with blue jeans, hopes to see green with brown denims made from naturally colored cotton that needs no dye and deepens in hue instead of fading. The leading brand-name clothing manufacturer is releasing a limited number of "coyote brown" men's jeans in time for Christmas and plans national distribution next summer. "We're really thrilled about this. I had a jacket on the other day, and everyone wanted to come up and touch it.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | Compiled by the Fashion staff
Is it too dangerous to wear a fur coat? Listen's mailbag contained a letter from an anonymous reader who thinks it might be. Her friend, she writes, was denied admission to a local theater, not identified by name, because she was wearing a fur coat. (A similar incident, involving a woman who was told she and her fox coat weren't welcome in a West Hollywood nightclub, was reported recently in the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | ELLIOTT MINOR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Johnny Dunn's cotton patch is awash in millions of light green, light brown and rusty red bolls. Dunn is among eight farmers in Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia who are taking part in the first experimental planting of naturally colored cotton on the East Coast. "I think this is the coming thing for the consumer," said Dunn, one of three Georgia farmers who agreed to grow 90 acres of naturally colored cotton. "You've got a lot of people who are environment-crazed.
HOME & GARDEN
October 15, 1994 | SANDRA EVANS, TIMES-POST NEWS SERVICE
Printed, swirling, vibrantly colored bedsheets may be a decorator's dream, but to Mary Lamielle they are nothing short of a nightmare. If she sleeps on them, she gets a burning feeling in her nose and lungs; her skin feels hot, and she may get a rash and a headache. To Lamielle, beige is beautiful, the kind of beige you get with cotton that is unbleached, undyed, untreated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1993 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ingrid Herda may not have any immediate plans to marry her partner, but she would like him to have the same health coverage as she does. So she was pleased when three Los Angeles City Council members introduced an ordinance Tuesday that would extend medical benefits to the unmarried domestic partners of city employees--both heterosexual and gay. "I've been waiting for this," said Herda, a management analyst in the city's Bureau of Sanitation.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yearning for a pair of indigo jeans or a black T-shirt that won't fade? That dream might become reality in a few years. Calgene Inc., perhaps best known for its introduction two years ago of a genetically engineered tomato that failed to live up to the company's high expectations, said Tuesday that it has received the first U.S. patent covering a gene that controls pigment in cotton.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It has been a good year for Anton Chekov, so much so that if he were still alive he could probably acquire a development deal and even his own parking space on any lot in town. "Uncle Vanya," one of the Russian playwright's classic works, has been the subject of two recent but very different productions.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1997 | JERRY NACHTIGAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like the early settlers who endured searing heat and deadly rattlesnakes crossing the Arizona desert, Sally Fox has learned it's not easy being a pioneer. As an entomologist and aspiring cotton breeder working in California's San Joaquin Valley in the late 1980s, Fox created a stir in the textile industry by developing a variety of naturally colored cotton that could be machine-spun.
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