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Sally K Ride

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August 29, 1999 | JANET WISCOMBE, Janet Wiscombe is a frequent contributor to The Times who last wrote about professional beach volleyball for the magazine
Sally Ride doesn't look like a woman outrageous enough to sit on top of a stack of enormous flaming rockets. There's absolutely nothing about her refined appearance or manner to suggest she has the grit to travel into the great, dark, airless abyss strapped to the seat of a hurtling piece of machinery. She's small, reserved, a reluctant heroine uneasy with eminence, a self-possessed but distant star who navigates her rarefied universe with quiet control.
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MAGAZINE
August 29, 1999 | JANET WISCOMBE, Janet Wiscombe is a frequent contributor to The Times who last wrote about professional beach volleyball for the magazine
Sally Ride doesn't look like a woman outrageous enough to sit on top of a stack of enormous flaming rockets. There's absolutely nothing about her refined appearance or manner to suggest she has the grit to travel into the great, dark, airless abyss strapped to the seat of a hurtling piece of machinery. She's small, reserved, a reluctant heroine uneasy with eminence, a self-possessed but distant star who navigates her rarefied universe with quiet control.
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NEWS
September 27, 1987
Saturday was the last day on the job for America's first woman in space, astronaut Sally K. Ride, 36, who announced last May that she was leaving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to join an arms control think tank at Stanford University. Ride's first spaceflight was aboard the space shuttle Challenger in 1983.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | United Press International
A NASA panel headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride will recommend development of a manned lunar base as the nation's next goal in space instead of a more glamorous flight to Mars, officials said Monday. But Ride, the first American woman in space and a veteran of two shuttle flights, told Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine that a manned outpost on the moon could serve as a stepping stone to Mars and that exploration of the red planet should remain as an ultimate American space objective.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
A task force headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride suggested Monday that the United States move toward building a permanent outpost on the moon as a way station toward the ultimate objective of "exploring, prospecting and settling Mars." The long-awaited report, ordered as a part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's effort to recover from the devastation of the January, 1986, Challenger disaster, was delivered to NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher last week and released Monday.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
After a year-long study of the future of the U.S. space program, astronaut Sally K. Ride on Wednesday outlined four potential initiatives for the 1990s and beyond, including a permanent outpost on the moon and landing an astronaut on Mars as early as the year 2005.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Former astronaut Sally Ride may be the next big name to quit the nation's top arms control center, putting pressure on Stanford University to change its policy on professorial appointments. Ride has refused all requests for interviews since joining the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control last year. But she did give a colleague, nuclear scientist Theodore Postol, permission to talk on her behalf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1986 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Astronaut Sally K. Ride expressed her enthusiasm Friday for the resumption of the space shuttle program and said she is confident the problems that led to the Challenger disaster have been overcome. NASA is doing "a good job with the design of the solid-rocket booster," Ride said before giving a lecture in Irvine as part of a UC Irvine-sponsored program.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Former astronaut Sally Ride may be the next big name to quit the nation's top arms control center, putting pressure on Stanford University to change its policy on professorial appointments. Ride has refused all requests for interviews since joining the Stanford Center for International Security and Arms Control last year. But she did give a colleague, nuclear scientist Theodore Postol, permission to talk on her behalf.
NEWS
September 27, 1987
Saturday was the last day on the job for America's first woman in space, astronaut Sally K. Ride, 36, who announced last May that she was leaving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to join an arms control think tank at Stanford University. Ride's first spaceflight was aboard the space shuttle Challenger in 1983.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
A task force headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride suggested Monday that the United States move toward building a permanent outpost on the moon as a way station toward the ultimate objective of "exploring, prospecting and settling Mars." The long-awaited report, ordered as a part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's effort to recover from the devastation of the January, 1986, Challenger disaster, was delivered to NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher last week and released Monday.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
After a year-long study of the future of the U.S. space program, astronaut Sally K. Ride on Wednesday outlined four potential initiatives for the 1990s and beyond, including a permanent outpost on the moon and landing an astronaut on Mars as early as the year 2005.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | United Press International
A NASA panel headed by astronaut Sally K. Ride will recommend development of a manned lunar base as the nation's next goal in space instead of a more glamorous flight to Mars, officials said Monday. But Ride, the first American woman in space and a veteran of two shuttle flights, told Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine that a manned outpost on the moon could serve as a stepping stone to Mars and that exploration of the red planet should remain as an ultimate American space objective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1986 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Astronaut Sally K. Ride expressed her enthusiasm Friday for the resumption of the space shuttle program and said she is confident the problems that led to the Challenger disaster have been overcome. NASA is doing "a good job with the design of the solid-rocket booster," Ride said before giving a lecture in Irvine as part of a UC Irvine-sponsored program.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1988
Shareholders of Apple Computer Inc., Cupertino, have elected former astronaut Sally K. Ride as a director. Ride, 36, who resigned from the astronaut corps in September, 1987, and is now a science fellow at the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, was elected to a one-year term on the six-member board.
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