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Sally Mann

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December 5, 2010 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Lexington, Va. The meandering path to the cabin where Sally Mann once photographed her young children is through a forest of towering oak, maple and hickory. It's on the Maury River, a mile and a half from the house and studio she designed for herself, and as she walks loudly through a thick layer of leaves and branches, she mentions something about bears. She saw a couple of black bears here just the other day while on horseback. "They're perfectly harmless," she insists, still crunching through the leaves, her dogs barking around her in the fading afternoon light, "but they shake you up a little bit. " The cabin is empty now and her three kids grown, each the subject of ongoing curiosity whenever spotted at one of their mother's openings, art stars by birth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Lexington, Va. The meandering path to the cabin where Sally Mann once photographed her young children is through a forest of towering oak, maple and hickory. It's on the Maury River, a mile and a half from the house and studio she designed for herself, and as she walks loudly through a thick layer of leaves and branches, she mentions something about bears. She saw a couple of black bears here just the other day while on horseback. "They're perfectly harmless," she insists, still crunching through the leaves, her dogs barking around her in the fading afternoon light, "but they shake you up a little bit. " The cabin is empty now and her three kids grown, each the subject of ongoing curiosity whenever spotted at one of their mother's openings, art stars by birth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | David Ng
PARENTS take pictures of their kids all the time, but Sally Mann's images of her three children were unlike any family album the public had ever seen. First shown in the 1980s, the photographs depicted her pre-adolescent offspring (Jessie, Emmett and Virginia) in various states of undress, their bare bodies arranged in defiant, almost confrontational poses. The controversy over the series' supposed sexual content helped make Mann an art-world sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | David Ng
PARENTS take pictures of their kids all the time, but Sally Mann's images of her three children were unlike any family album the public had ever seen. First shown in the 1980s, the photographs depicted her pre-adolescent offspring (Jessie, Emmett and Virginia) in various states of undress, their bare bodies arranged in defiant, almost confrontational poses. The controversy over the series' supposed sexual content helped make Mann an art-world sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2004 | Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post
A dense fog enshrouds Rockbridge County this morning, and Hogback Mountain is barely visible. But it's typical for the Shenandoah Valley to experience dramatic changes in weather every few minutes, and today is no exception. By the time a visitor arrives at Sally Mann's 423-acre farm, the fog has mostly lifted and the distinctive hump of Hogback is vividly limned in the bright sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"What Remains: The Life and Work of Sally Mann," premiering tonight on Cinemax, pays an extended visit to the controversial photographer, best known for her 1992 collection "Immediate Family," with its arresting images of her often naked children. Directed by Steve Cantor ("loudQUIETloud: A Film About the Pixies"), it delivers what its subtitle promises, showing how the life gives context to the work and how the work, the urge to make the work, and the process of making the work order the life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sally Mann's photographs of her three, pre-teen - age kids vividly describe what it's like to be a child. In a dozen black-and- white pictures at G. Ray Hawkins Gallery, contradictions run wild. Playful games of dress-up contrast with touching images of absolute unself-consciousness. A solitary child's rich fantasy life reverberates against utter alienation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001
Michael Hoffman, the director of the Aperture Foundation, which publishes fine art photography books and Aperture magazine, has died. He was 59. Hoffman died Nov. 23 in New York City of complications from meningitis. As a college student, Hoffman began working with Aperture in 1964 after attending a workshop with Minor White, the influential photographer who helped found Aperture in 1952. Hoffman took over the business end of the operation and later launched the book publishing operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Land Surveyor: Sally Mann's landscape photographs lack the psychological tension of her well-known portraits of her children. Of course, it's difficult to imagine any picture of an unpopulated expanse of forest or farmland that is as charged as the artist's stunningly intimate depictions of her kids as sexual creatures, both frighteningly like adults yet clearly different from us.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may not be as famous as most of the other Academy Award candidates, but Steven Cantor's telephone has been ringing madly with calls from agents, producers, directors and journalists ever since the nominations were announced Wednesday morning. "Taylor Hackford woke me up this morning," Cantor, 26, said Thursday, referring to the director of "An Officer and a Gentleman."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"What Remains: The Life and Work of Sally Mann," premiering tonight on Cinemax, pays an extended visit to the controversial photographer, best known for her 1992 collection "Immediate Family," with its arresting images of her often naked children. Directed by Steve Cantor ("loudQUIETloud: A Film About the Pixies"), it delivers what its subtitle promises, showing how the life gives context to the work and how the work, the urge to make the work, and the process of making the work order the life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2004 | Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post
A dense fog enshrouds Rockbridge County this morning, and Hogback Mountain is barely visible. But it's typical for the Shenandoah Valley to experience dramatic changes in weather every few minutes, and today is no exception. By the time a visitor arrives at Sally Mann's 423-acre farm, the fog has mostly lifted and the distinctive hump of Hogback is vividly limned in the bright sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sally Mann's photographs of her three, pre-teen - age kids vividly describe what it's like to be a child. In a dozen black-and- white pictures at G. Ray Hawkins Gallery, contradictions run wild. Playful games of dress-up contrast with touching images of absolute unself-consciousness. A solitary child's rich fantasy life reverberates against utter alienation.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
This month, it was a Harvard art student taking a course called "Innocence in Nudity" and pictures of her nude 4-year-old son. Last year, it was a couple of middle-aged professors in Michigan, who had decided to enlarge a photograph of their son, taken 18 years earlier as he stepped into a pair of underpants after a bath.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yes, Jock Sturges does photograph blossoming young girls in the nude; and, yes, his pictures have catalyzed a heated debate about what is sacred and what is profane in such depictions. But, ironically, the photographs are not nearly as provocative as the debate surrounding them.
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