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Sally Nyolo

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September 10, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New divas seem to be arriving in the burgeoning arena of world music almost as frequently as new young stars in Hollywood films. Cameroonian singer Sally Nyolo, who appears at LunaPark in West Hollywood on Saturday, is one of the latest, and one of the best. But Nyolo is no inexperienced newcomer. In the last year and a half, she has emerged from the collective music environment of Zap Mama to become a strikingly individual artist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New divas seem to be arriving in the burgeoning arena of world music almost as frequently as new young stars in Hollywood films. Cameroonian singer Sally Nyolo, who appears at LunaPark in West Hollywood on Saturday, is one of the latest, and one of the best. But Nyolo is no inexperienced newcomer. In the last year and a half, she has emerged from the collective music environment of Zap Mama to become a strikingly individual artist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
This Cameroonian singer-guitarist's latest album, which has just been released in this country, has been riding the top of the European world music chart--and with good cause. Like Lokua Kanza, Wasis Diop and his compatriot, Sally Nyolo, Dikongue is at the crest of a new movement in African music that emphasizes songs filled with easygoing melodies and poetic lyrics, which he does superbly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When singer Henri Dikongue says that his music was influenced by James Taylor, and that he listened closely to George Benson and Aretha Franklin when he was young, and that his favorite music is Brazilian, it's a little hard to buy. A musician from the West African country of Cameroon inspired by American and Brazilian artists--and, especially, by singer-songwriters such as Taylor and Gilberto Gil? Seems unlikely.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
World music means many things to many people. For some, it's simply an all-inclusive way to describe the 80% or so of global sounds that aren't a direct product of the U.S. and European pop music mills. For others, it means world beat--a fusion of traditional music, the rhythms of pop and the audio technology of synthesizers and the recording studio.
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