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Sally Potter

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June 26, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf
Sally POTTER is a filmmaker with legs, great ones actually, literally and metaphorically. Seen slinking on screen with Argentine heartthrob and tango sensation Pablo Veron in "The Tango Lesson," Potter boldly cast herself in the 1997 film, which she wrote and directed and for which she co-composed much of the steamy music. Smashing boundaries is nothing new for the British auteur, who made her name in 1992 with the Oscar-nominated "Orlando."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | John Horn and Mark Olsen
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- The new film “Ginger and Rosa” by English filmmaker Sally Potter screened Friday night at the Telluride Film Festival high in the mountains of Colorado. A tale drawn in no small part from Potter's own life, the movie follows two young girls through a coming-of-age story set against the early '60s backdrop of nuclear disarmament protests and the Cuban missile crisis. With stirring performances by relative veteran Elle Fanning and newcomer Alice Englert, the film is on the fall festival circuit in search of U.S. distribution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a deal of exquisite simplicity: When British film director Sally Potter fell in love with the tango, she cornered one of its leading exponents, Argentine Pablo Veron, and told him: "Teach me to tango--and I'll make you a film star." Did Veron imagine he would be romancing a succession of young, statuesque Hollywood starlets on screen? It is unclear. But in any case he acquiesced--and thus, a film, Potter's "The Tango Lesson," was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf
Sally POTTER is a filmmaker with legs, great ones actually, literally and metaphorically. Seen slinking on screen with Argentine heartthrob and tango sensation Pablo Veron in "The Tango Lesson," Potter boldly cast herself in the 1997 film, which she wrote and directed and for which she co-composed much of the steamy music. Smashing boundaries is nothing new for the British auteur, who made her name in 1992 with the Oscar-nominated "Orlando."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The temperature was minus 14 degrees, and British director Sally Potter was shooting a scene against the clock on a frozen lake. "I'd worked since 6 a.m. for that scene. I spent 20 straight hours out on the ice." Ah, the joys of low-budget, independent filmmaking. But Potter's hardships are now paying off. Her film, "Orlando," based on Virginia Woolf's fantasy novel about a man who changes into a woman and stays in the prime of life over four centuries, has become an international art-house hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
What Gertrude Stein said about Oakland applies equally to "Orlando" (the movie, not the metropolis): There's no there there. Though visually impressive and assured, it is the hollowest of successes, all chic set design, smug posturing and self-satisfied attitude. Adapted from Virginia Woolf's time-travel fantasy by British writer-director Sally Potter, "Orlando" seems so intent on having something meaningful to say that for a while one waits patiently for the word.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | John Horn and Mark Olsen
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- The new film “Ginger and Rosa” by English filmmaker Sally Potter screened Friday night at the Telluride Film Festival high in the mountains of Colorado. A tale drawn in no small part from Potter's own life, the movie follows two young girls through a coming-of-age story set against the early '60s backdrop of nuclear disarmament protests and the Cuban missile crisis. With stirring performances by relative veteran Elle Fanning and newcomer Alice Englert, the film is on the fall festival circuit in search of U.S. distribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Given the amount of ego essential to sustaining the careers of filmmakers, it's surprising that more movies aren't made as self-portraits. At least, it's surprising until you suffer through something like Sally Potter's "The Tango Lesson." Potter, a British director ("Orlando"), performance artist and former dancer, has trained the script and camera on herself with such a steady, self-admiring gaze, it almost forces you to look away.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Following are capsule reviews of screenings in the American Film Institute's BritFest during the UK/LA '88 Festival. 'BEST OF BRITISH SHORTS' Monicas, 8:45 p . m. A variable collection--notable for its concentration on the whimsical.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Fresh from its screenings at film festivals in Telluride and Toronto and ahead of its upcoming appearance at the New York Film Festival, "Ginger & Rosa" has been picked up for distribution by the new company A24. The latest from British filmmaker Sally Potter, "Ginger & Rosa" will be released for awards consideration by the end of the year with a theatrical release in early 2013. A semi-autobiographical story that powerfully sets the coming-of-age of two young girls against the English anti-nuclear protest movement of the early 1960s, the film stars Elle Fanning and newcomer Alice Englert (daughter of director Jane Campion)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a deal of exquisite simplicity: When British film director Sally Potter fell in love with the tango, she cornered one of its leading exponents, Argentine Pablo Veron, and told him: "Teach me to tango--and I'll make you a film star." Did Veron imagine he would be romancing a succession of young, statuesque Hollywood starlets on screen? It is unclear. But in any case he acquiesced--and thus, a film, Potter's "The Tango Lesson," was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
What Gertrude Stein said about Oakland applies equally to "Orlando" (the movie, not the metropolis): There's no there there. Though visually impressive and assured, it is the hollowest of successes, all chic set design, smug posturing and self-satisfied attitude. Adapted from Virginia Woolf's time-travel fantasy by British writer-director Sally Potter, "Orlando" seems so intent on having something meaningful to say that for a while one waits patiently for the word.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The temperature was minus 14 degrees, and British director Sally Potter was shooting a scene against the clock on a frozen lake. "I'd worked since 6 a.m. for that scene. I spent 20 straight hours out on the ice." Ah, the joys of low-budget, independent filmmaking. But Potter's hardships are now paying off. Her film, "Orlando," based on Virginia Woolf's fantasy novel about a man who changes into a woman and stays in the prime of life over four centuries, has become an international art-house hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2008 | August Brown
John McCain may have tried to mock Barack Obama for voting to fund a projector for a planetarium, but the New York-based space-rockers Secret Machines are firmly in the tank for light shows. Their new self-titled album is a reverb-heavy head trip all its own, but for the tour, which hits the Key Club on Thursday, they're setting their lasers to "dazzle." The stage setup was created by light artist and set designer Es Devlin, who had previously plotted Kanye West's stage for his "Touch the Sky" tour, Sally Potter's film version of "Carmen" and Philip Glass' opera "Orphee."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a moment for girls on the cusp of growing up that is fraught with both naiveté and worldliness, when teddy bears and T.S. Eliot are somehow comfortable companions for diary entries made in a darkening night. Filmmaker Sally Potter has set those passionate times inside the turmoil of '60s-era London, radio updates of the Cuban Missile Crisis crackling in the background of her beautifully wrought "Ginger & Rosa. " It follows the two lifelong friends of the title, finely acted by Elle Fanning and Alice Englert, respectively, as they experiment with smoking, boys, hair, clothes, politics, protest, religion, sex, love, all with the crushing passion and rising cynicism of those only beginning to see the world for what it is. Potter, who wrote and directed the film, is patient in weaving together their discoveries and disappointments and that most perilous of times when Ginger first realizes her parents are as flawed, fragile and afraid as she is. Events will divide and define both girls in ways that didn't seem possible and Potter has given us the best seat in the house for all of it. PHOTOS AND MORE TIMELINE: Violence in movies ENVELOPE: The latest awards buzz PHOTOS: Greatest box office flops
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