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Sally R Reed

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just a few days after making a recommendation that construction of a new courthouse in Lancaster be put on indefinite hold, county Chief Administrative Officer Sally R. Reed on Monday toured the existing court and found conditions "overwhelming." After a 90-minute briefing and tour of the municipal and superior courts in Lancaster, Los Angeles County's top administrator said, "I can't help but be concerned about the position the courts are dealing with here.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Sally Reed's tenure as Los Angeles County's chief administrative officer ending this week, the Board of Supervisors may seek a successor more closely attuned to political realities than the bottom line when it comes to repairing the county's troubled finances. During the past 2 1/2 years, Reed has mapped out a tough road to financial stability.
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NEWS
August 11, 1993 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday picked Sally R. Reed, chief executive of Santa Clara County, to take the reins of the county's vast bureaucracy as chief administrative officer, filling a position that has been vacant since the February ouster of former CAO Richard B. Dixon. Reed, 50, who has been the CAO of Santa Clara County for 12 years, was narrowly selected for the $174,000-a-year post after a six-month nationwide search.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1996 | Bill Boyarsky
With Sally Reed leaving as Los Angeles County chief administrative officer, the supervisors and bureaucracy will be tempted to return to their lackadaisical ways. Reed, a straight-talking, conservative bottom-liner, was hired as the county's top fiscal officer 2 1/2 years ago. She quickly learned that the county was spinning toward bankruptcy. Her prescriptions were extreme, including closing County-USC Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1993 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sally Reed, the Santa Clara County executive tapped to run Los Angeles County's vast bureaucracy, said she plans to tackle her new job the same way she always has: "My way," she said, first with a straight face, and then with the easy smile that is a key to her personable, one-on-one style of management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Sally Reed's tenure as Los Angeles County's chief administrative officer ending this week, the Board of Supervisors may seek a successor more closely attuned to political realities than the bottom line when it comes to repairing the county's troubled finances. During the past 2 1/2 years, Reed has mapped out a tough road to financial stability.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stark budget proposal to be released Monday, Los Angeles County's top administrator warns that the nation's largest county government has used a series of one-time financial moves and extensive borrowing to mask the fact that it has been spending far more than it receives. If the practice continues, Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed bluntly states, the county is marching down the same road to fiscal insolvency taken by New York City two decades ago and most recently by Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles County's day of reckoning with its unprecedented budget deficit nears, threats against Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky and Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed have prompted the county to take special security precautions. Yaroslavsky is the swing vote on the five-member Board of Supervisors, which is considering proposals to enact sweeping budget cuts that could cost 10,000 county employees their jobs as early as next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995
As officials struggle to find ways to shrink Los Angeles County's health-care system, the county's top administrator on Friday called for almost $48 million in new budget cuts in law enforcement and other government programs, including closing five probation camps for youthful offenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | CARLA RIVERA and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
She was hired on her record as a no-nonsense fiscal conservative, someone who could finally impose restraints on a Los Angeles County government that at times seems out of control. County operations needed a dose of bitter medicine, and the Board of Supervisors decided Sally Reed was the one to administer it. What a difference six months make.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the end, the challenge was simply too big for Sally Reed. She came to the seat of power in Los Angeles County government on a mission: to bring spending in the nation's largest county government into line with its resources--even if that meant cutting jobs and programs. That was not a welcome approach for many. "I could take the arrows," Reed said in an interview Friday. "What I couldn't take were the compromises."
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sally Reed, Los Angeles County's chief administrative officer, whose strong will and tight-fisted fiscal approach reshaped the nation's largest county government but created tension with her elected bosses, is resigning to head the Department of Motor Vehicles, state and county sources confirmed Thursday. Reed, who could not be reached for comment, informed the Board of Supervisors late Thursday of her decision to become DMV director beginning June 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressed by Supervisor Gloria Molina to clarify the depth of Los Angeles County's financial troubles, Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed on Monday drastically scaled back her assessment that the county faces a $1-billion budget problem in the coming fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995
As officials struggle to find ways to shrink Los Angeles County's health-care system, the county's top administrator on Friday called for almost $48 million in new budget cuts in law enforcement and other government programs, including closing five probation camps for youthful offenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As officials struggle to find ways to shrink Los Angeles County's health care system, the county's top administrator Friday called for almost $48 million in new budget cuts in law enforcement and other government programs, including the closure of five probation camps for youthful offenders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles County's day of reckoning with its unprecedented budget deficit nears, threats against Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky and Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed have prompted the county to take special security precautions. Yaroslavsky is the swing vote on the five-member Board of Supervisors, which is considering proposals to enact sweeping budget cuts that could cost 10,000 county employees their jobs as early as next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
Sally Reed arrived at the Los Angeles County Hall of Administration with the naive assumption she could bring honest bookkeeping to county government. But Reed, the county administrative officer, has seen her proposals shredded by the supervisors who hired her. In the seven months since she arrived, she's learning there's not much market at the hall for her simple prescription for reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
In a welcoming mood, the Los Angeles County supervisors cleared the agenda of anything controversial Tuesday for Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed's first meeting. She sat silently at the CAO's small desk, below the supes' elevated rostrum, watching her new bosses as if she were trying to figure the dynamics between these five imperious politicians. Nothing in the supervisors' behavior gave a hint of how they'll act during the crises to come. There were no flare-ups between them.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The proposed Los Angeles County budget plan released Monday would shut down six of eight San Fernando Valley health clinics, affecting thousands of low-income residents from Burbank to Canoga Park who rely on the facilities for basic health care from pediatric services to immunizations.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles County's top administrator Monday unveiled a budget proposal full of sweeping cuts, the county turned to a syndicate of Swiss, German and American banks to guarantee repayment of $1.3 billion in short-term borrowing, and a Wall Street credit rating agency placed the county's long-term debt under review. The county's purchase of a bank letter of credit to guarantee this week's $1.
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