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Sally Spencer

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NEWS
February 24, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
Some elegant cats came out to meet some alley cats the other day to help them get permanent homes. In an effort to promote cat adoptions at Cat Care Shelter in West Los Angeles, the elegant cats, people who play cat characters in the hit musical "Cats," appeared at the shelter in costume and met the real felines, about 200 of them that are overflowing the compound at 2240 Barry Avenue.
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NEWS
February 24, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
Some elegant cats came out to meet some alley cats the other day to help them get permanent homes. In an effort to promote cat adoptions at Cat Care Shelter in West Los Angeles, the elegant cats, people who play cat characters in the hit musical "Cats," appeared at the shelter in costume and met the real felines, about 200 of them that are overflowing the compound at 2240 Barry Avenue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
"You Never Can Tell"? Pshaw--of course you can. "You Never Can Tell" is early Shaw (1897), and it has been mounted at South Coast Repertory. With that kind of pedigree, it almost goes without saying that it will be impeccably staged, in the tradition of the award-winning "Misalliance" (1987). The play itself is not exactly unpredictable, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Cats" has landed on its feet at the Shubert. I wish its producers had followed their original plan and used a Hollywood sound stage for it--imagine sitting in a total surround of junk, with those cats at your elbow! I also wish Betty Buckley were singing Grizabella. So much for might-have-beens. "Cats" at the Shubert remains one of the most imaginative and eye-pleasing musicals of the century, as original a show as its predecessor, "42nd Street," was unoriginal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
A sweet silly story with a girl and a boy, the book was created for wordplay and joy. The artist behind it was a Geisel called Seuss, a genius cartoonist and baby-boom Mother Goose. The movie takes place in a bright-colored town, a twee little burg unblighted by frowns. The girl and the boy are quiet as slugs, when along comes a Cat dressed up in a rug. The Cat is played by the comic Mike Myers, a zany Canuck whom I tend to admire.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Not everything went according to plan at the opening of the California Music Theatre's new season in a new theater with an old show. But that everything went at all was miraculous enough. The show is "Show Boat." Van Johnson, who was supposed to headline as Cap'n Andy (and celebrate his 75th birthday at Saturday's opening as well), played the Wednesday and Thursday previews, but was hospitalized Friday with a bronchial infection that will sideline him for the rest of the run.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Nobody can accuse Harry Groener of hiding one of his flops. The slim, red-haired star of "Sunday in the Park With George" at South Coast Repertory turned up for this interview at the Costa Mesa theater in a crimson jacket with the words, "Sleight of Hand," emblazoned across the back. That stage thriller by John Pielmeier, in which Groener played a vile magician bent on murder, managed to last eight performances after opening on Broadway a couple of seasons ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Prediction: "Sunday in the Park With George" will eventually be performed as a one-act, leaving out the modern adventures of "George" completely. Harry Groener is "George" in South Coast Repertory's lovely revival of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's 1984 musical. First, Groener plays George Seurat, a painter so obsessed with his work that he probably would have sacrificed his grandmother to it, let alone a mistress or two. (Sally Spencer plays his mistress.) Then, after intermission, Groener plays another George, a young 1980s artist who may be descended from Seurat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's fun to wallow in "Closer Than Ever," at International City Theatre in Long Beach. If you're anywhere near the 30-to 50-years-old, middle-to-upper-class characters who inhabit the songs of Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire, you'll probably find at least a half dozen irresistible moments in this smartly sung and staged revue. Wallowing, of course, doesn't demand much effort, and the same can be said of "Closer Than Ever." The songs are instantly accessible and seldom surprising.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | LESLIE BERESTEIN
A tutoring class has helped 15 junior and senior high school students do more than just improve their grades. For students such as Mikey James, 12, a boy about to graduate from a nine-month tutoring program at the Heart of Los Angeles Youth center, the class has helped them keep their lives together in a neighborhood where many youths end up on the street.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Sue Reilly writes regularly for The Times
The Cambridge Cupboard is a cozy Woodland Hills tearoom, swimming in a sea of trendy San Fernando Valley coffeehouses and gourmet grind shops. Its cheery decor offers a place for expatriated Brits to chat over a cuppa while mixing with native-born Anglophiles (who probably tape "Masterpiece Theater" and know all the words to the Monty Python dead parrot routine).
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