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Salman Rushdie

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
County academics and visiting members of the National Council of Churches on Monday agreed that an interfaith conference on how literature can defame any religion would be of benefit to Muslims, Jews and Christians. During a lunch meeting at UC Irvine, members of the NCC's Office of Christian/Muslim Relations and the local Academy for Judaic, Christian and Islamic Studies learned that they had both been contemplating similar conferences in reaction to the outcry surrounding Salman Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses" and Ayatollah Ruholla Khomeini's subsequent death threat against the author.
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WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - The Hindu epic "Ramayana" features a 10-headed villain, a magical golden deer and the flying monkey god Hanuman. But when an American religion scholar described the canonical poem as fictional, some religious conservatives were shocked. Angered by what they called an insulting, inaccurate and sexualized depiction of India's predominant faith by University of Chicago divinity professor Wendy Doniger, Hindu activists waged a four-year court battle against her book "The Hindus: An Alternative History.
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NEWS
September 25, 2012 | by Hector Tobar
Salman Rushdie has published a new book, the memoir "Joseph Anton," which describes his ordeal after the publication of "The Satanic Verses" and the fatwa issued against him. I interviewed Rushdie at the London Hotel in West Hollywood for a profile in Sunday's Arts & Books section. Here are additional excerpts from our conversation. Hector Tobar: How is it that you came to write “Joseph Anton” in the third person? Salman Rushdie: I tried to write it in the first person and I hated it. It felt self-regarding and narcissistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In the late 1970s, long before he penned "The Satanic Verses," before he sparked a global uproar between Islamic fundamentalists and free-speech advocates and became a marked man, before he turned into a celebrity man of letters who dates models and starlets, Salman Rushdie was just the failed author of a sci-fi fantasy. An obscure Indian expat living in England, he had only that first novel, "Grimus," under his belt when he turned his attention to his homeland. While studying at Cambridge he had met E.M. Forster, the venerable British author of classics like "A Passage to India" and "A Room With a View," and the elder novelist had encouraged him to write about the subcontinent.
OPINION
April 12, 1992
I wholeheartedly agree with Yoder's assessment of the philistinism displayed by the Bush Administration. What the Rushdie affair has taught us (and tragically, Salman Rushdie himself) is that whether it's the Iranian, Indian or American government, it's all one global political fraternity. They may be competing, but in the end they all follow similar rules and rites. RASHMI SADANA, Santa Monica
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
After hearing reports that an Iranian organization had increased the standing bounty on his head, author Salman Rushdie was nonplussed. "I'm not inclined to magnify this ugly bit of headline grabbing by paying it much attention," he told The Times through his publisher. Rushdie has been through this before. His forthcoming memoir, "Joseph Anton," chronicles his time living under the 1989 fatwa issued by Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Rushdie and his then-wife, Marianne Wiggins, lived under threat of death after religious extremists took issue with his novel "The Satanic Verses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
This is Salman Rushdie's season of peacemaking. No, the great Indian British novelist hasn't forgiven the Iranian authorities who leveled a "Rushdie must die" fatwa against him back in 1989 for the perceived blasphemies in his novel "The Satanic Verses. " Nor has he made peace, as far as we know, with his second wife, Marianne Wiggins, who is the subject of a most unflattering portrait in Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton. " But in that same book Rushdie did, in effect, apologize at length to his third wife, Elizabeth West, for the poor judgment he showed in leaving her for his fourth wife, Padma Lakshmi, the statuesque beauty he first met under the Statue of Liberty.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
For lovers of good literary controversy, Salman Rushdie is the gift that keeps on giving. A few months after the publication of Rushdie's memoir “Joseph Anton,” the New York Review of Books (where they specialize in this sort of thing) published a takedown of Rushdie , written by the British novelist and journalist Zoe Heller. Heller accuses Rushdie of being disingenuous when he says in his memoir that he had no idea his iconoclastic 1989 novel “The Satanic Verses” would set off such a violent and vicious controversy--more than 50 people were killed and the Iranian regime declared a fatwa against him. Rushdie  told The Times in an interview this summer that he was “naïve” about what the reaction to “The Satanic Verses” would be. Baloney, says Heller.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Salman Rushdie's Booker Prize-winning 1980 novel "Midnight's Children" is many things - ambitious, chaotic, fantastical, mythic - but generic it isn't. Which makes the long-awaited film version a real head-scratcher, a pretty but staidly linear epic drained of the novel's larkish, metaphorical sweep, and a collection of multi-generational love stories lacking their originally eccentric, fizzy charm. It was perhaps a fool's errand to try to tame Rushdie's stylistically bold, time-juggling bildungsroman, which weaves India's 20th century growing pains with those of the magical, telepathic children born at the moment of its independence (midnight, Aug. 15, 1947)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
There's a certain joy that comes with reading a great literary takedown, the kind of mean but intelligent and precise review that eviscerates the pretensions and the sloppiness of a truly awful book. Over in Britain, they think of a good pan as a kind of public service, and they award a prize for the best pan of the year. “The Hatchet Job of the Year,” it's called, and it's handed out by “The Omnivore,” a review-aggregating website. Now in its second year, the prize is awarded to “the writer of the angriest, funniest, most trenchant book review of the past twelve months.” Last year's winner was Adam Mars-Jones for his review of Michael Cunningham's novel “By Nightfall.” Eight talented and fearless critics are nominated for this year's Golden Hatchet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
For lovers of good literary controversy, Salman Rushdie is the gift that keeps on giving. A few months after the publication of Rushdie's memoir “Joseph Anton,” the New York Review of Books (where they specialize in this sort of thing) published a takedown of Rushdie , written by the British novelist and journalist Zoe Heller. Heller accuses Rushdie of being disingenuous when he says in his memoir that he had no idea his iconoclastic 1989 novel “The Satanic Verses” would set off such a violent and vicious controversy--more than 50 people were killed and the Iranian regime declared a fatwa against him. Rushdie  told The Times in an interview this summer that he was “naïve” about what the reaction to “The Satanic Verses” would be. Baloney, says Heller.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
This is Salman Rushdie's season of peacemaking. No, the great Indian British novelist hasn't forgiven the Iranian authorities who leveled a "Rushdie must die" fatwa against him back in 1989 for the perceived blasphemies in his novel "The Satanic Verses. " Nor has he made peace, as far as we know, with his second wife, Marianne Wiggins, who is the subject of a most unflattering portrait in Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton. " But in that same book Rushdie did, in effect, apologize at length to his third wife, Elizabeth West, for the poor judgment he showed in leaving her for his fourth wife, Padma Lakshmi, the statuesque beauty he first met under the Statue of Liberty.
OPINION
October 3, 2012 | Patt Morrison
In the 1990s, he was the world-famous novelist few people officially laid eyes on. Of Salman Rushdie's dozen-plus novels, it was "The Satanic Verses" (1988) that raised a hue and cry and sent him undercover: Its supposedly sacrilegious portrayal of the prophet Muhammad brought Rushdie a fatwa, a death sentence, from Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (it was lifted in 1998). The writer came to L.A. to accept the Library Foundation of Los Angeles' literary award and to talk about his new memoir of his underground years, "Joseph Anton.
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