Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSalman Rushie
IN THE NEWS

Salman Rushie

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Hard-line Muslim cleric Syed Ahmed Bukhari on Tuesday withdrew his threats against British author Salman Rushdie, who plans to visit his native India later this year. Bukhari threatened last month that Muslims would harass Rushdie throughout his visit. In a speech about Rushdie to thousands of followers during Friday prayers last month, Bukhari said: "The punishment for blasphemy is death." India was the first to ban Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses"--the novel called blasphemous by Muslim leaders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Hard-line Muslim cleric Syed Ahmed Bukhari on Tuesday withdrew his threats against British author Salman Rushdie, who plans to visit his native India later this year. Bukhari threatened last month that Muslims would harass Rushdie throughout his visit. In a speech about Rushdie to thousands of followers during Friday prayers last month, Bukhari said: "The punishment for blasphemy is death." India was the first to ban Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses"--the novel called blasphemous by Muslim leaders.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
About 2,500 Chinese Muslims chanting "Punish China's Rushdie" marched through Beijing today demanding that two editors be imprisoned for publishing a book on the sexual habits of Muslims. "These men must be jailed," said Li Jing, a Uighur Turk from the Central Academy of Nationalities and a leader of the protest. "If they disappeared from the face of the Earth, we would be happy." The protest came a day after Iran President Ali Khamenei said at a news conference in Beijing that Iran still demands the execution of British author Salman Rushie, who is accused of blaspheming Islam in his book, "Satanic Verses."
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
About 2,500 Chinese Muslims chanting "Punish China's Rushdie!" marched through Beijing on Friday demanding that two editors be imprisoned for publishing a book that purportedly describes the sexual habits of Muslims. "These men must be jailed," said Li Jing, a Uighur Turk from the Central Academy of Nationalities and a leader of the protest. "If they disappeared from the face of the earth, we would be happy." The protest came a day after Iranian President Ali Khamenei told a news conference in Beijing that Iran still demands the execution of British author Salman Rushie, who is accused of blaspheming the Islamic religion in his book, "The Satanic Verses."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|